Almanack Contributor NYS DEC

NYS DEC

Information attributed to NYSDEC is taken from press releases and news announcements from New York State's Department of Environmental Conservation.


Monday, May 9, 2022

DEC Shares Safety Tips on Spring Recreation in the Adirondacks

Mud Season Muddy Trail Adirondacks (Adirondack Mountain CLub Photo)The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) reminds visitors to recreate responsibly in the Adirondacks this spring to help protect State lands for future generations. Spring is an excellent time to get outdoors and enjoy warming temperatures, but it can also pose many risks to outdoor enthusiasts, wildlife, and natural resources. DEC encourages visitors to public lands to recreate responsibly to protect themselves and the resource.

Practice the Seven Principles of Leave No TraceTM: Leave No Trace™ principles provide a framework for safe and sustainable recreation. Based on outdoor ethics rather than rules, the principles provide guidelines that can be tailored to a variety of outdoor activities and an individual’s specific experience. Before heading out to visit State lands, DEC encourages outdoor adventurers to review and familiarize themselves with these principles to help be prepared, stay safe, and minimize damage to shared lands and waterways.

Follow the Muddy Trail Advisory: Hikers are advised to avoid hiking on high elevation trails above 2,500 feet until further notice. Despite recent warm weather, high elevation trails are still covered in slowly melting ice and snow. These steep trails feature thin soils that become a mix of ice and mud as winter conditions melt and frost leaves the ground. Sliding boots destroy trail tread, damage surrounding vegetation, and erode thin soils, increasing the likelihood of washouts; rotten snow and monorails are a safety hazard even with proper equipment; and high elevation and alpine vegetation are extremely fragile during this time.

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Friday, May 6, 2022

Outdoor Conditions (5/6): Blowdown on hiking trails to be cleared as staff increases

outdoor conditions logoThe following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

NEW THIS WEEK:

High Peaks Wilderness: Snow Conditions, 05/05: Snow depths remain significant at high elevations, with areas reaching 2-3 feet in depth. Snowshoes are required to be worn wherever snow accumulations are greater than 8 inches. Crampons and microspikes are still essential – many trails are still icy above 3,000 feet. Be prepared to encounter mud at lower elevations. Check summit weather forecasts for more accurate predictions at higher elevations. A mid-April snowstorm caused significant blowdown, making navigation more challenging. Carry a paper map and compass or GPS and know how to use them. Please avoid all trails above 2,500 feet while DEC’s muddy trails advisory is in effect.

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Thursday, May 5, 2022

A chance to give input on inclusivity, accessibility in outdoors

accessibilityTwo Virtual Public Forums on Inclusivity, Accessibility, and Sustainability in the Outdoors Scheduled for May

DEC, in collaboration with the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and the Adirondack Park Agency (APA), will be hosting a two-part webinar series on integrating inclusivity, accessibility, and sustainability in providing access to state lands.

In each session, Janet Zeller, a national expert on accessibility of outdoor recreation for people with disabilities, will give a presentation, followed by a discussion facilitated by the DEC/APA Accessibility Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives of people with disabilities who are focused on improving the accessibility of outdoor recreation across New York State.

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Wednesday, May 4, 2022

Rangers conduct wilderness rescue in North Elba, respond to brush fire in Lake Luzerne

forest ranger report

 

Recent NYS Forest Ranger actions:

North Elba
Essex County
Wilderness Rescue:
 On April 30 at 10 p.m., Essex County 911 requested Forest Ranger assistance for a hiker suffering from an unstable knee injury on Algonquin Peak. Ranger Evans made contact with the 25-year-old from Vermont and instructed her partner to make a brace so the pair could continue moving downhill.

When Rangers Evans and Lewis reached the hiker at 1:30 a.m., they re-splinted the knee and helped the hikers out of the woods. At 6 a.m., the subject went to Glens Falls Hospital for further treatment.

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Monday, May 2, 2022

I Love My Park Day set for May 7

The 11th Annual I Love My Park Day will be held on Saturday, May 7. I Love My Park Day is hosted by Parks & Trails New York in partnership with DEC and New York State Parks will host events at 145 state parks, historic sites, and public lands across the state.

Volunteers will celebrate New York’s public lands by cleaning up debris, planting trees and gardens, restoring trails and wildlife habitats, removing invasive species, and working on various site improvement projects.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, May 1, 2022

ECOs crack down on fishing violations

Recent actions from Adirondack-region Environmental Conservation Officers

fishing violationFishing Violations – Warren County

On the morning of April 15, Lieutenant Higgins and ECO Brassard patrolled a small trout pond in Queensbury and discovered several anglers catching freshly stocked trout without incident. However, some anglers also possessed out-of-season chain pickerel. In addition, two fishermen had failed to buy a fishing license, resulting in tickets to the offenders.

Later that afternoon, ECO Lapoint patrolled stocked streams in Lake George and located two anglers, one of whom exceeded the limit of trout he could legally catch and the other who did not have a valid fishing license. ECO Lapoint issued tickets to both anglers and educated the pair about daily limits and how purchasing a fishing license supports fish stocking in New York State.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 30, 2022

Outdoor Conditions (4/30): Use caution with monorails/very cold water temps

outdoor conditions logo

The following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

High Peaks Wilderness: Snow Conditions, 04/27: Snowshoes are still required for most high elevation trails where snow remains deeper than 8 inches. Crampons and microspikes are still essential – many trails are still icy, especially above 3,000 feet. Trails are extremely muddy at lower elevations. Remaining ice on high elevation lakes is completely unstable and will not hold weight. Expect high water in drainages. Check summit weather forecasts for more accurate predictions at higher elevations. Recent heavy, wet snowfall has caused significant blowdown, making navigation more challenging. Carry a paper map and compass or GPS and know how to navigate. Please avoid all trails above 2,500 feet while DEC’s muddy trails advisory is in effect.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, April 29, 2022

Fishing season kicks off statewide May 1 for most coolwater sportfish

This year (and every year after) May 1st will mark the official statewide season opener for most of the coolwater sportfish species in New York. This includes walleye, northern pike, chain pickerel, and tiger muskellunge. (Muskellunge season opens on June 1).

These sportfish species provide fun, yet challenging, fishing opportunities across the state.

If you’re targeting members of the Pike Family- northern pike, chain pickerel and tiger muskellunge, you should consider using a steel-leader tied to the end of your line. This will prevent the sharp teeth of these species from slicing your line and ultimately save you some frustration.

Knowing what the habitats are for sportfish will give you a better understanding of where you should fish for them. For example, chain pickerel are generally found year-round in shallow, weedy areas, whereas northern pike move from shallow water flats after spawning in the early spring to deeper, cooler water sections of lakes and rivers as temperatures rise through late spring and summer.

To learn more about fishing for these species in New York visit our website or see the links below.
How to Fish for Walleye
Walleye Fishing in New York
Pike, Pickerel and Tiger Musky Fishing in New York

Photo at top: A fisherman shows off his catch. DEC photo. 


Wednesday, April 27, 2022

Rangers conduct search and rescue training in Saratoga County

forest ranger report

Recent NYS DEC forest ranger actions:

Town of Corinth
Saratoga County
Search and Rescue Training:
 On April 22, Forest Ranger Baker took part in search and rescue training organized by Lower Adirondack Search and Rescue (LASAR).

Rangers often work with LASAR members during large search missions. Members of Hudson Mohawk Search and Rescue were also in attendance.

Be sure to properly prepare and plan before entering the backcountry.

Visit DEC’s Hike Smart NYAdirondack Backcountry Information, and Catskill Backcountry Information webpages for more information.

Forest rangers take part in search and rescue training in the Town of Corinth in Saratoga County. NYS DEC photo.

If a person needs a Forest Ranger, whether it’s for a search and rescue, to report a wildfire, or to report illegal activity on state lands and easements, they should call 833-NYS-RANGERS. If a person needs urgent assistance, they can call 911. To contact a Forest Ranger for information about a specific location, the DEC website has phone numbers for every Ranger listed by region.

 


Tuesday, April 26, 2022

Pen-Rearing Project for Atlantic Salmon in Lake Champlain

salmon runInnovative Project to Help Increase Salmon Survival After Stocking
The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced the second year of a five-year experimental Atlantic Salmon pen rearing project on the Saranac River Estuary. In partnership with the Plattsburgh Boat Basin, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Lake Champlain chapter of Trout Unlimited, SUNY Plattsburgh, and Paul Smith’s College, the initiative will help improve post-stocking survival of this species.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, April 25, 2022

DEC Launches 2nd Year of Lake Champlain Fishing Creel Survey

essexSurveys Conducted April through October 2022
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced open-water fishing creel surveys are being conducted for a second year on the New York waters of Lake Champlain through October 2022.

This open-water fishing survey, along with the ice fishing survey, provides DEC fisheries biologists with a better understanding of angler use, catch, harvest, and expectations to help inform management actions on Lake Champlain.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 23, 2022

Signs of Spring: Fiddlehead ferns

fiddlehead fernsHave you spotted curly corkscrews emerging from the forest floor this spring? Look closely as the woods begins to “wake up” this season, and you’re likely to see some fiddleheads. Fiddleheads are the frizzy furls of a young fern that will unroll into a fresh frond. Most species of ferns go through this brief stage, which gets its name for its resemblance to the coiled end of a string instrument.

In folklore, ferns are often described as possessing magical qualities because of their “invisible” reproduction. Having been around for 300+ million years (well before the dinosaurs!), this ancient group of plants preceded flowering species and instead reproduces with spores. These spores can be spotted on the underside of the fern’s fronds after the fiddlehead unfurls.

Please note: many of NY’s native ferns are protected species and should never be taken from the wild unless you have the permission of the landowner.

DEC photo


Friday, April 22, 2022

Outdoor conditions (4/22): Renewed snow conditions, muddy trails

outdoor conditions logoThe following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information web pages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

This Earth Day, Give Back by Getting Involved

Earth Day, April 22, is a wonderful time to assess how we interact with our natural world. Do you Leave No Trace while recreating outdoors? Do you pick up trash along trails or your street? Our outdoor spaces give us so much – fresh air, a place to recreate, an opportunity to slow down and disconnect – just to name a few. We rely on the earth for everything, so it’s important that we also consider how we can give back to it.

This Earth Day, find out how getting involved with Leave No Trace can help you give back. Whether it’s participating in a volunteer day, attending an event, taking a training, or supporting a program – there are many ways to join Leave No Trace in making a positive difference for our outdoor spaces as well as current and future visitors.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 21, 2022

Love My Park Day seeks volunteers

logoJoin us for the 11th I Love My Park Day on Saturday, May 7

I Love My Park Day, held the first Saturday in May, attracts thousands of volunteers from across the state to participate in cleanup, improvement, and beautification events at New York State parks, historic sites and public lands. Join us to celebrate New York’s park system and prepare our public lands for spring by cleaning up park lands and beaches, planting trees and gardens, restoring trail and wildlife habitat, removing invasive species, and working on various site improvement projects.

Click here to volunteer and/or create an event at a park near you


Wednesday, April 20, 2022

Head injury on Rondaxe; fires in Washington and Warren counties

forest ranger reportRecent NYS DEC Forest Ranger actions

Town of Webb
Herkimer County
Wildland Rescue:
 On April 11 at 1:07 p.m., Raybrook Dispatch received a call from Herkimer County 911 advising that a hiker had sustained a head injury near the summit of Rondaxe Mountain. Forest Ranger Lt. Hoag and Rangers Evans, McCartney, Milano, Miller, Shea, and Thomes responded. EMTs from Old Forge Ambulance administered care to the 57-year-old hiker from Sherrill. Rangers conducted the technical rope work necessary to safely lower the subject down the mountain through four steep-angle locations to an ambulance. The hiker was transported to Old Forge Airport where Mercy Flight flew him to the hospital. Also assisting in the rescue were members of DEC’s Division of Law Enforcement, Old Forge Fire, Inlet Fire, Eagle Bay Fire, and Webb Police. Resources were clear by 4:30 p.m.

» Continue Reading.



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