Almanack Contributor NYS DEC

NYS DEC

Information attributed to NYSDEC is taken from press releases and news announcements from New York State's Department of Environmental Conservation.


Saturday, August 29, 2020

Fish Barrier Dam Facelift in St. Regis Canoe Area

Fish barrier dams are an essential tool for the protection of native and restored fish communities from non-native species that could devastate the current native fish populations.

Little Fish Pond Barrier DamThe Little Fish Pond barrier dam is the lowermost fish barrier dam protecting the waters of the Saint Regis Canoe Area from invasion by non-native species. It was built prior to one of the biggest reclamation projects in NYS history. In 1952-1954,14 ponds and 21 miles of inlets, outlets, river and tributaries were treated to restore wild trout populations.

The main part of this dam was rehabilitated in 2015 and 2016 by Region 5 fisheries staff and the Student Conservation Association (SCA). In 2020, fisheries staff built a new splash deck to prevent scour in the river channel below the dam from forming a jump pool. From start to finish, DEC and SCA staff have spent nearly 1,100 labor-hours on this dam. The improvements should protect these valuable resources while providing a unique angling experience for many years to come- a true testament to the lasting value of such an endeavor.

DEC photo


Friday, August 28, 2020

Outdoor Conditions (8/28): Reviewing High Peaks rules

This bulletin provides only the most recent notices. Check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for more detailed information on access, outdoor recreation infrastructure, and conditions.

Emergency Situations: If you get lost or injured; keep calm and stay put. If you have cell service, call 911 or the DEC Forest Ranger Emergency Dispatch, 518-891-0235.

Hike Smart by packing the proper gear. See our recommended packing list and safety tips.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 27, 2020

Help Monarchs on their Long Migration South

Monarch butterfly on flowerMonarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) begin their annual fall migration in mid-August. These butterflies are the great-great-grandchildren of the monarchs that migrated to Mexico last fall.

You can help monarchs by providing food (nectar) and keeping those areas protected:

  • Turn a portion of your lawn into a wildflower meadow—plant milkweed or other native wildflowers.
  • Delay mowing areas with milkweed until later in the fall.
  • Avoid using herbicides—they kill all life-stages of monarchs (egg, caterpillar, cocoon, and adult).
  • Report sightings of adults online. View a map of the sightings so far this year.

Don’t know when their migration peaks in your area? Check out this migration chart.

Photo by Sandy Van Vranken.


Wednesday, August 26, 2020

Mama bear chases jogger; rangers assist lost, missing hikers

Town of Long Lake
Hamilton County
Wilderness Search:
 On August 20 at 2:30 p.m., Hamilton County 911 transferred a call to DEC’s Ray Brook Dispatch from a lost hiker on Owls Head Mountain in the Sargent Ponds Wild Forest. Forest Rangers Temple, Scott, and DiCintio responded to the trailhead. With no coordinates from the dropped call, New York State Police Aviation was called in with Forest Ranger Praczkajlo to search the marshy areas where the subject was believed to be. Coordinates obtained through a 911 callback placed the hiker in a marshland just off the south side of the mountain. At 6:25 p.m., Dispatch was notified that the 69-year-old hiker from Baltimore, Maryland, had been located and reunited with her family.

Lost hiker assisted by Forest Ranger after being lost in the Sargent Ponds Wild Forest/DEC photo

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 26, 2020

Drought Watch Continues for Adirondacks

The Drought Watch continues for four regions of New York. The area includes Long Island, the Upper Hudson/Mohawk area, the Adirondacks, and the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence area.  For more detailed drought information, visit DEC’s Drought webpage.

Visit DEC’s Saving Water Makes Good Sense webpage for conservation tips that homeowners can take to voluntarily reduce their water usage.


Monday, August 24, 2020

Check in With Your Trees

black locust tree courtesy wikimedia user AnRo0002If you have trees on your street or in your yard, this is your friendly reminder to do a seasonal check-in. Take a look at your trees and ask yourself the following questions:

  • Are the trees healthy looking?
  • Are there many dead branches?
  • Do you see signs of significant damage by insects, or signs of any invasive forest pests?
  • Do you notice any potential cause for concern such as off-color leaves, new fungal growth, or cavities?

If you have concerns, you may want to contact a certified arborist or tree service. Checking in with your trees periodically and noticing any unusual changes is the first step in making sure they can continue to help our Earth for years to come.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 23, 2020

Lions, Tigers… and Jumping Worms?!

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program’s (APIPP) final Summer Learning Event is right around the corner, and this topic may be of interest to a wide array of anglers, gardeners, hikers, and foresters alike. Invasive jumping worms are a creepy crawly creature coming our way from other parts of the state with destructive consequences for forest habitats among other environments.

Spread by human activities from being used as live bait during fishing trips, to being carried on shoes and pets within dried mud, or brought into gardens in potted plants and compost – these voracious decomposers damage soil structure, root systems, and negatively impact forest habitats. They are present in many other parts of New York State, but limited in the Adirondack Region, and our hope is to keep it that way by growing awareness!

Title: Emerging Species – Watch Out for Jumping Worms

Date: Tuesday, August 25th, 10-11:30 a.m.

RSVP Link: Register online via APIPP’s website. Secure Zoom portal sent to your email upon registration.

 

 


Saturday, August 22, 2020

Guidance for Managing Recalled Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer

In July 2020, the Federal Food and Drug Administration issued a warning about a sharp increase in hand sanitizer products that are labeled to contain ethanol (also known as ethyl alcohol) but that have tested positive for methanol contamination. Methanol, or wood alcohol, is a substance that can be toxic when absorbed through the skin or ingested and can be life-threatening when ingested. The FDA is working with manufacturers to recall products. This guidance addresses actions you can take to dispose of recalled hand sanitizer.
» Continue Reading.


Friday, August 21, 2020

Gypsy moth caterpillar damage common across the state

2020 has been a boom year for the Gypsy moth caterpillar, and the Department of Environmental Conservation has been receiving reports of unusually high Gypsy moth populations and leaf damage in several parts of New York State.

Gypsy moths are not native to New York, but they are naturalized into the eco-system, meaning that they will always be in our forests. They tend to have a population spike every 10 to 15 years, but it is usually offset by predators, disease, and other natural causes. The caterpillars are beginning to disappear now as they transition into the next cycle of their lives and become moths.

One year of defoliation is probably nor going to kill your trees, but over the course of a couple years it typically leads to tree death. The DEC will be monitoring Gypsy moth caterpillar populations to predict whether a major defoliation should be expected.

For more information on Gypsy moths in New York State, visit the DEC’s website.


Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Kayakers go missing on Union Falls Pond

forest ranger logoRecent NYS DEC Forest Ranger actions:

Town of Franklin
Franklin County
Wilderness Rescue: 
On Aug. 14 at 10:11 p.m., DEC’s Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from a woman reporting that her two friends were overdue from kayaking on Union Falls Pond. The 21-year-old woman and 22-year-old man from New City went to watch the sunset from their kayaks but their friends grew concerned when it got dark because the pair are not familiar with the area. Forest Ranger Baldwin responded to the camp and after interviewing members of the party, determined that the group had found one of the kayaks along the shore. Ranger Baldwin swept the road in the surrounding area before reaching out for assistance. Once cleared of a separate incident, Forest Ranger Praczkajlo responded to assist with the search and was on scene at 12:26 a.m. Forest Rangers fueled up and used the reporting party’s boat and began searching the area where the kayak was found. Rangers turned off the motor and yelled out for the missing kayakers. At 1:12 a.m., the Rangers heard the pair yelling for help from the shore and proceeded to pick them up. The overdue kayakers stated that when one of their kayaks flipped, they panicked and attempted to grab onto the other one, flipping it, and then swam to shore. Rangers Baldwin and Praczkajlo took the two kayakers back to their camp and the incident concluded at 2:18 a.m.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 18, 2020

DEC sets up pop-up hiker information stations

DEC logoIn an effort to provide increased education outreach, real-time updates and general information to hikers in the High Peaks region, DEC and Town of Keene stewards will staff hiker information stations at several high-traffic locations. We encourage visitors to stop by these locations for information about parking, alternative hiking locations, local land use rules and regulations, safety and preparedness, and Leave No Trace. Please visit us at the following locations:

  • Mid’s Park, Lake Placid: Friday, 1 p.m. – 7 p.m.
  • High Peaks Rest Area, Northbound Route 87: Sat. & Sun., 6 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
  • Marcy Field, Keene: Friday-Monday, 7 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Monday, August 17, 2020

DEC Cancels Open House at Perch River WMA

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) canceled an open house at Perch River Wildlife Management Area (WMA) out of an abundance of caution to protect public health due to the Department of Health’s (DOH) recent discovery of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) in horses in the immediate vicinity.

EEE is carried by mosquitoes and transferable to animals and people. DOH plans to spray for mosquito control in that area of Jefferson County.

DEC’s Perch River WMA open house was scheduled to open Saturday, August 15, and run through Sunday, August 30. (Click here for all the WMAs having open houses.) For additional information, bird lists, and maps, contact DEC’s Regional Wildlife Office at 315-785-2263 or visit the DEC webpage .

Perch River WMA in Jefferson County/DEC photo


Monday, August 17, 2020

Get Thrifty: Today is National Thrift Store Day

If you’re in search of ways to live a more sustainable lifestyle, one effective way to reduce waste and conserve natural resources is through buying gently used items and supporting second hand shopping. Thrifting and second hand shopping has environmental, social, and economic benefits such as:

  • Job creation that supports materials reuse and the circular economy
  • Maintaining value of an item by keeping it in the supply chain instead of sending it to a landfill or incinerator where it has no value
  • Reducing consumption of natural resources like water, fibers, metals, and fossil fuels by getting more use of items

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 16, 2020

DEC seeks photographers to provide wildlife photos

The DEC Bureau of Wildlife is seeking photographs  to use in all DEC materials, including reports, social media, posters, newsletters, and for their website. New York State’s wildlife has been busier than ever this summer. The DEC invites citizens to capture and share the best moments of their local wildlife. If you sit outside and watch, you may be surprised at what you see.

Submit photos online until Friday, Sept. 11 at 11:59 am. Remember to stay safe while watching wildlife, and do so in a manner that is not harmful to them.


Saturday, August 15, 2020

Duck, goose hunting season dates set for fall

Duck Hunting Season Dates

duckEach year, DEC works with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Atlantic Flyway Council to develop waterfowl hunting regulations and season dates. This year, DEC, with the assistance of Cornell University and the waterfowl hunter task forces, implemented a new process for selecting the 60-day duck season dates within the dates allowed by the USFWS. New York duck seasons offer opportunity to hunt from the first week of October through the last Sunday in January, depending on the waterfowl hunting zone. By having five waterfowl zones, it allows DEC to select dates that maximize duck abundance in each zone which varies based on habitat and latitude.

» Continue Reading.



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