Monday, October 5, 2020

Young people play important role in Climate Smart Community achievements

The Village of Saranac Lake and the Village of Homer in the Finger Lakes region were awarded a bronze level certification in the New York State Climate Smart Communities (CSC) program. The awards came during NYS Climate Week.

The efforts of young people mobilizing for climate action and resilience, inspired by the Wild Center’s Youth Climate Program and its annual Adirondack Youth Climate Summit, is seen as a key contribution to this designation. The climate program has brought together over 180 students from over 30 NYS schools to increase their climate literacy and leadership abilities since 2008.

Cedar Young, a youth leader in the Village of Saranac Lake says the following about the certification: “By receiving bronze certification, Saranac Lake has shown leadership in raising public awareness of climate change and lowering our community’s carbon footprint.”

» Continue Reading.


Monday, October 5, 2020

‘Ask An Expert’ panels to address environmental, cultural, policy issues

This October, Paul Smith’s College and The Adirondack Research Consortium (ARC) are hosting a series of four “Ask An Expert” panel discussions focused on key environmental, cultural and policy issues facing the Adirondack region and its communities.

The four webinars, hosted via Zoom and free/open to the public, will feature both physical and social science experts discussing a wide variety of subjects, from road salt and aquatic invasive species to history through the lenses of indigenous peoples, slaves and women. Questions for any of the panels can be sent in advance to [email protected].

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Sunday, October 4, 2020

Boat stewards report successful season and other invasives updates

The boating season may have unofficially ended Labor Day weekend, but New York State’s Watercraft Inspection Steward program continues at select locations. To date, this year’s boat stewards have inspected more than 330,000 boats, talked with hundreds of thousands of water recreationists, and intercepted more than 18,000 aquatic plant and animal hitchhikers (including one very important finding of the infamous invasive plant hydrilla!).

When you’re enjoying the water this fall, please continue to support our stewards’ good work and protect NY’s waters by remembering to clean, drain, and dry your watercraft.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, October 3, 2020

DEC reminds campers to follow firewood rules

emerald ash borer photo courtesy DECThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) marked the beginning of fall camping season by reminding New Yorkers and visitors to prevent the spread of damaging invasive species by following state firewood requirements when obtaining wood for campfires.

In recognition of October as National Firewood Awareness Month, DEC is releasing new PSA across the state to help raise awareness about firewood movement and its role in spreading invasive species.

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Thursday, October 1, 2020

Land Trust Map Tells Story Behind 7 Protected Places

A recent graduate of the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry has created a new multimedia map describing seven northern New York sites that improve the public’s ability to connect with nature.

Jessica Henshaw Grant, the Adirondack Land Trust’s 2020 intern, published an ArcGIS StoryMap entitled “Lasting Conservation: Exploring Publicly Accessible Properties from the Adirondack Land Trust Portfolio.” Grant explored and analyzed 22 sites conserved by the Adirondack Land Trust over 36 years. She summarized her research in the web-based StoryMap application, using interactive maps, audio, video, text and photography to convey results.

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Monday, September 28, 2020

Salmon runs and deadlines

Atlantic Salmon courtesy NOAA FisheriesRight now, we’re getting down to crunch time at the Adirondack Explorer, wrapping up many of our writing and photo assignments for the November issue.

We’ve got a lot of interesting news and recreational features lined up for this issue, including ones about Boquet and the Saranac rivers and how they’ve been impacted by dams. Atlantic salmon, in particular, have historically seen their spawning grounds cut off by the dams. Not only in the Adirondack region, but on the west, too.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, September 28, 2020

DEC and Partners Announce Effort to Prevent Spread of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation DEC Announced that they, along with Cornell University’s NYS Hemlock Initiative, The Adirondack Invasive Plant Program, Lake George Land Conservancy, and The Fund for Lake George, are developing a plan to mitigate the spread of the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid HWA on Forest Preserve Lands in the towns of Dresden and Fort Ann, in Washington County. The DEC confirmed the HWA infestation August of 2020, in infected hemlock trees at the Glen Island Campground on the shore of Lake George. This marks the second infestation of HWA in the Adirondacks.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 26, 2020

Increasing ways for recycling food scraps

large scale drum composter at North Country School Camp Treetops in Lake Placid

Home Composting takes some care, as well as greens, browns, water and air. Fall is a great season to start home composting, as an abundance of leaves, and the waste from fresh fruits and vegetables can become an excellent resource for a compost pile. Compost supplies our soils with organic matter and nutrients which help capture and retain water, providing an environment for beneficial microorganisms to enliven plant roots. To learn more about home composting options click here. You can also tune into composting specialist Gary Feinland talk about common problems people encounter while creating a backyard composting pile and how to remedy them.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 26, 2020

ANCA hosts virtual clean transportation summit

electric car charges at a downtown Saranac Lake EV charging station provided by ANCAAdirondack North Country Association (ANCA) is gearing up for a virtual summit that will advance clean transportation — a key ingredient to the state’s low-carbon future.

“Clean Transportation: the Adirondack ON-RAMP,” will focus on topics including EV infrastructure, public transportation and commercial vehicles, as well strategies and policies for making clean transportation more accessible for residents and communities in northern New York.

Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul will be the summit’s keynote speaker. She will speak about the North Country’s clean transportation efforts in relation to New York State’s goals, incentives and policies, including the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act (CLCPA).

» Continue Reading.


Friday, September 25, 2020

Making the case for water reporting

You care about the Adirondacks, its woods, waters and people. That’s why you’re reading the Explorer (and its sister site the Adirondack Almanack), on top of everything else going on in the world.

Like the park, the Explorer is a special place. Last year, it hired me to come write about water — so abundant here we might just take it for granted.

As beautiful and seemingly protected as that water is, I’ve reported how that beauty and those protections only run so deep. There’s pollution we can’t see and problems we haven’t fixed, like the contamination caused by road salt or the sewage slowly fouling up Lake George.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Get to Know New York’s Natives: Red Maple

With fall officially upon us, there’s no better native to highlight this month than one of the first trees to showcase its autumn colors – the red maple (Acer rubrum).

Red maple is one of the most common tree species in the eastern United States, and red maple trees can be found all across New York State. This species’ tolerance of a wide range of site conditions makes it suitable for both natural and urban environments. Mature trees tend to reach a height of 40-60 feet with a full canopy of 30-40 feet in width.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, September 21, 2020

Ditch the car for ‘Car Free Climate’ Campaign

New York State has launched a “Go Car-Free for the Climate” campaign in recognition of Climate Week 2020, which will take place September 21-27.

There are several ways to go car free, such as carpooling or combining errands into a single day, using public transit or walking to your destination.

Transportation makes up 36% of greenhouse gases in New York State, which is more then electricity generation, waste, refrigerants, and agriculture combined. Car Free for Climate is aligned with New York State’s long term plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2030, and 85% by 2050 from its levels in 1990.

To participate, just click here to take a pledge not to drive your car for at least one day out of the week of September 21 to September 27. Those who participate are encouraged to spread the word to their friends, family, and neighbors about going Car free for Climate. Use of the social media hashtag #NYSCarFree is also encouraged to spread the message as far as possible.


Monday, September 14, 2020

Fighting a hemlock invasion

Hemlock woolly adelgidScientists have found a large swath of trees with hemlock woolly adelgid in the Lake George watershed, including a 1.5-mile stretch along the eastern shoreline. This is in addition to some that was found in August on Glen Island.

This is considered especially troubling for the Lake George region because hemlocks are so prevalent there, and they play a key role in the ecosystem, providing habitat for trout and other wildlife.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, September 13, 2020

Reporter’s notebook: ‘Climate change is water change’

Boreas River headwaters. Photo by Phil Brown 9/5/16.These weekly emails are supposed to come “out of the notebook,” a journalism term for something in my notes that hasn’t made it into a story.

Right now, I’m still working on my next stories and it’s hard to say what in my notebook will or won’t make it. So, let me share a few concepts that are important to our coverage here, particularly mine.

First, since I spend my time writing about water, I think a lot about what climate scientist Brad Udall says: climate change is water change.

 

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 12, 2020

Compost Awareness Week Poster & Video Contest

International Compost Awareness Week (ICAW) May 2 – 8, 2021 – Save the date!

This upcoming year’s ICAW 2021 theme, Grow, Eat…Compost…Repeat, empowers us to recognize and promote the importance of composting and the use of compost in growing healthier food, supporting healthier soils and, ultimately, creating a more just and sustainable world.

Video Contest Grades 4-8: This international contest runs from September 1, 2020 through November 2, 2020. Submit a short video (less than 30 seconds) highlighting this years theme, Grow, Eat…COMPOST…Repeat. Learn more about the video contest and rules.

Poster Contest Grades 9 -12 and Adults: This international contest runs from September 1, 2020 through November 2, 2020. Submit a poster design highlighting this years theme, Grow, Eat…COMPOST…Repeat. Learn more about the poster contest and rules.



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Support the Adirondack Almanack and the Adirondack Explorer all year long with a monthly gift that fits your budget.