Thursday, July 23, 2020

Adirondack groups cheer passing of road salt reduction bill

road salt The NYS Senate granted final approval Thursday to a bi-partisan bill that would help reduce road salt pollution and protect drinking water in the Adirondack Park.

The legislation creates an Adirondack Road Salt Reduction Task Force and Pilot Program. If approved by the Governor, the new law would establish a salt-reduction pilot program from October 2021 through 2024 to test alternative measures already shown to work better and cost less than current winter road maintenance practices.  Highway safety would remain the top priority.

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Thursday, July 23, 2020

Town of Bolton and LGLC to Purchase Bradley’s Lookout

The Town of Bolton and the Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC) have announced their intention to purchase a 62 acre parcel of land in the town known as Bradley’s Lookout. The Town will purchase the property from the LGLC upon completion of their acquisition expected to occur late this summer. The property will be encumbered by a conservation easement held by the LGLC.

The Hawkins family has owned the 62+/- acre property known as “Bradley’s Lookout” in Bolton since the 1970’s. The property contains 7 acres of wetlands, including half of the pond that is located on the Town of Bolton’s Community Center property. The remainder of the land is wooded, including many stands of healthy hemlocks. The land includes a 1000-foot summit that offers views of Lake George including Dome Island as well as Black Mountain, Shelving Rock, and the Sagamore. The name comes from the historical use of the property, as the Bradley family who ran a horse-riding business in town, brought their horses up the summit to allow visitors to enjoy the views.

Photo provided: View from Bradley’s lookout of Lake George

 


Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Plastic Free July: Participants share their tips for reducing waste

From the NYS DEC: A sampling of ways participants in Plastic Free July are looking for ways to reduce their waste and keep more plastic packaging and products out of the waste stream.

Do you have any tips to share? Add them in the comments section below!

Kayla’s Goal: Reduce plastic meal packaging, beverage jugs, and toiletries
To gear up for Plastic Free July, Kayla kicked things off by making sure she had the items on hand she’d need to accomplish her goals.

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Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Responding To Call For Help, LGA Partners With Putnam To Solve Issue

By Patrick Dowd

Polluted stormwater isn’t just a problem in developed areas around Lake George. Just last week Lake George Association staff worked with the Town of Putnam’s Highway Superintendent, Gary Treadway, to implement a solution that stems the flow of polluted stormwater and protects the Lake’s water quality.

A small grassy swale (designed to capture stormwater) adjacent to the Town of Putnam Fire Department’s Lake access area in Glenburnie (northern Washington County) was filled to capacity with sediment, causing polluted stormwater to run into the lake and onto the neighbor’s dock and property.

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Tuesday, July 21, 2020

DEC Releases Final Plans to Improve Saranac River’s Imperial Mills Dam

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Acting Regional Director Joe Zalewski today announced the release of final plans to improve the Imperial Mills Dam, including installing a fish ladder to provide for passage of landlocked Atlantic salmon and modifying the dam to bring it into compliance with dam safety regulations. The Imperial Mills Dam, also known as the Main Mill Dam, is located on the Saranac River approximately 3.2 miles upstream from Lake Champlain, in the city of Plattsburgh, Clinton County.

 

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Saturday, July 18, 2020

It’s Debatable: Restore Mother Nature Bond Act

From the July/August 2020 issue of Adirondack Explorer, editors asked the question: “Is now the right time for New York to move forward with the Restore Mother Nature Bond Act?”
Below is the “YES” response, from John Sheehan of the Adirondack Council and “NO,” from Roger Dziengelski, retired woodlands manager, chief forester and senior vice president for Finch Paper in Glens Falls.
Weigh in with your thoughts in the comments section!

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Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Monitoring for European Cherry Fruit Fly – You Can Help

I love cherries! Especially sweet cherries. They’re delicious fresh, high in fiber, and loaded with vitamins, minerals, and beneficial antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds, which may lower your risk of developing certain cancers, heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and/or obesity.

Growing consumer education about the antioxidant health benefits of cherries appears to be creating increased demand for the fruit. Domestic cherry consumption in the United States is now around 2 pounds per person per year.

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Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Water, water everywhere, but still the need to conserve

Colleen rows the boat on Long Lake by Alexandra RoalsvigWhile recent rains have helped some parts of the Adirondacks, other parts are stuck in a dry spell that began with the mild winter.

On Tuesday, the Town of Long Lake told residents to stop washing their cars and watering their lawns to conserve water.

Long Lake’s water superintendent, Keith Austin, said a dry spell left the town unable to keep up with current demand. The system serves about 800 full-time residents and a seasonal population of 2,000 people in a typical year.

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Sunday, July 12, 2020

Reducing Your Waste this Summer: Tips from the DEC

Summer is the time for outdoor barbeques, picnics and parties, and while you are having fun the DEC wants to remind us to reduce, reuse, and recycle our waste correctly this summer.

They’ve released a variety of tips and suggestions in their weekly newsletter to this end. To reduce waste, opt for reusable plates, cups, cutlery and napkins as opposed to the typical solo cups and paper pates for your next outdoor feast. You can learn to make your own drinks as well as opposed to using pre-mixed beverages that come in bulky plastic containers.

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Friday, July 10, 2020

Sparking widespread interest in composting

Editor’s note: This article is reprinted with permission and first appeared here

Soon, large-scale producers of food waste in NYS will be required to either compost or donate their food waste to food pantries. Like many other states, my guess is that it’s just a matter of time before all landfilling of food wastes will be banned in New York State. Vermont banned residential food waste from landfills this year.

Is it possible to compost everything that comes out of commercial and residential kitchens? Absolutely. Some of you in the Adirondacks have been doing this successfully for decades. However, incorporating meat and dairy into compost systems can be tricky. Until recently.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 9, 2020

Check your flood risk

New national maps suggest flood risk is far higher than most people realize, in New York and across the country.

In some Adirondack counties, thousands more properties are considered at risk of flooding than federal flood estimates have shown, according to data by First Street Foundation, a Brooklyn-based nonprofit.

The group released a simple online tool, called Flood Factor, that lets people look up their flood risk by address. The website is part of a growing body of work by data scientists trying to reckon with the risk of disasters, like floods and fires, that occur at the boundary of development and nature.

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Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Join the Invasive Species Mapping Challenge

NY iMapinvasvies is now running their fith annual Invasive Species Mapping Challenge, available to anyone.

The challenge consists of tracking invasive plants and animals across New York State in order to help prevent the spread of these species.

This year’s challenge will focus on the Jumping Worm, the Tree of Heaven, the Water Chestnut, and the European Frogbit. Through July 15, try and find any or all of the four species, report them to the iMap app (available for free) and compete with other seekers on their leaderboards, earning the title of champion in the process. To view more information on the competition and the current leaderboards, check out iMaps website.


Monday, July 6, 2020

Protecting Berry Crops from Fruit Fly Infestation

The spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is a vinegar or fruit fly native to Southeast Asia. It’s been in Hawaii since the 1980s and was first detected in North America in 2008, in California. In 2010, it was discovered in Florida, the Carolinas, Michigan, and Utah; eventually turning up in NY’s Hudson River Valley in 2011.

Its range now includes the entire continental United States, with the exception of Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and South Dakota, as well as several Provinces across Canada (British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island). Its many hosts include raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, grapes, cherries, peaches, plums, and other late-season, soft-flesh fruits.

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Sunday, July 5, 2020

Report puts focus on Upper Hudson

When people talk about the Hudson River and its problems, my mind immediately goes to the GE cleanup of toxic waste around Fort Edward and Hudson Falls.

There are problems closer to home, though. The river, after all, begins atop Mount Marcy. It flows off as Feldspar Brook and turns into the Opalescent River before becoming the Hudson.

All along the 7.5 million acres that drain into the river before it reaches Troy, the part known as the Upper Hudson, are threats to the river and its natural flow. The lingering effects of acid rain that make fish dangerous to eat. Road salt. Eroding stream banks. The habitat disruption caused by even small dams.

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Sunday, July 5, 2020

Solar project to benefit the bees, too

Saranac Lake Community Solar has partnered up with AdkAction to complete a local community solar project which will create 10 acres of pollinator habitat.

These 10 acres will provide a local source of clean energy for the village of Saranac Lake, as well as its surrounding communities. The solar farm will provide homeowners, renters, and businesses solar energy without the cost of equipment, installation and maintenance, and thanks to the support of AdkAction’s pollinator project, this will be the first pollinator-friendly solar farm in the Adirondacks.

 

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