Monday, November 18, 2019

Clean Water Regs Affect Some Marinas

Marinas on Lake George and Lake Placid (and on every other “AA-Special” waterbody in New York State) must start complying with national clean water regulations that require run-off from boat decontaminations, fluid changes and any other so-called industrial activities to be treated on site.

According to Bob Stegemann, regional director of the Department of Environmental Conservation, the federal government’s Clean Water regulations “do not allow for direct discharge of storm water to groundwater. It needs to be either eliminated or controlled or treated as point source pollution.” » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 18, 2019

Nature Conservancy Has New Philanthropy Associate

The Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Chapter has announced it has hired Abby Blum as its new associate director of philanthropy.

Blum comes to The Nature Conservancy from Middlebury College’s Office of Advancement, where she served as senior development officer for nearly seven years. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Adirondack Land Trust Staff Grows by Two

The Adirondack Land Trust has hired two conservation professionals to fill the new positions of philanthropy assistant and land protection manager. Kathy Woughter is expected to play a role in building support for the Adirondack Land Trust’s mission and work to connect people to conservation work, with a focus on young and diverse constituents.

Before moving to the Adirondacks this year, Woughter worked in higher education in Western New York, most recently as Vice President of Student Affairs at Alfred University. Woughter has won awards as an ally for diversity and cultural unity. Her husband Bob is the principal of Keene Central School. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 11, 2019

Study Finds Gender Bias in Bird Conservation Plans

male Golden winged Warbler by Jack HruskaAfter pairing up and raising chicks, males and females of some bird species spend their winter break apart. At the end of their journey to Central or South America, you might find mostly males in one habitat, and females in another.

Yet conservation strategies have typically overlooked the habitats needed by females, putting already-declining species in even more peril, according to a new study in the journal Biological Conservation. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 11, 2019

APA To Consider Sentinel Range Wilderness UMP, Blue Mtn Wild Forest Changes

APA Building in Ray Brook NYThe Adirondack Park Agency (APA) will hold its monthly meeting at its headquarters in Ray Brook this Thursday, November 14, 2019.

The Board will consider whether the first full Sentinel Range Wilderness Area Unit Management Plan, and changes to the Blue Mountain Wild Forest Unit Management Plan conform to the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan.

What follows is a meeting agenda provided by the APA: » Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 10, 2019

State Forest Preserve Use Plans Ignore Climate Change

Noah Shaw, former general counsel for the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), contributed to the drafting of New York State’s groundbreaking 2019 climate legislation. This September, he wrote an op-ed in the Adirondack Explorer,What New York’s Bold Climate Law Means for the Adirondacks.”

The Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act of 2019 “outlines a so-called ‘carbon offset’ program as a counter-weight to the 15 percent of emissions that may remain after all our other emissions-reducing actions are taken,” he wrote. “These will likely come from hard-to-clean-up activities like aviation, agriculture, shipping and heavy industry. New York’s most valuable carbon offset resource, also known as a ‘sink,’ is its forestland. This is good news for the Adirondack Forest Preserve.” » Continue Reading.


Saturday, November 9, 2019

Exploring Adirondack Climate Change Impacts

Temperature data from four international science institutions. All show rapid warming in the past few decades and that the last decade has been the warmest on record. Data sources: NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, NOAA National Climatic Data Center, Met Office Hadley Centre/Climatic Research Unit and the Japanese Meteorological Agency. (Graph produced by Earth Science Communications Team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory | California Institute of Technology)On the whole, processes that contribute to the accelerated climate change we are currently experiencing are a threat to the Adirondack Park, our national security, and the world’s human security.

Here are a few stories about the impacts Climate Change is having on the Adirondack Park.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 7, 2019

High Peaks Public Use Planning Announced, Advisory Group Named

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos has announced a new strategic planning initiative, with a goal of sustainably managing public use in the Adirondack High Peaks.

The High Peaks Strategic Planning Advisory Group, comprised of what a DEC press announcement called “key stakeholders with expertise in local government, recreation, natural resource protection, business, tourism, and other priority areas” are expected to collaboratively provide advice on how to balance issues associated with the increased public use of the High Peaks, » Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 7, 2019

Local Group Awarded Multi-Year Invasives Contract

APIPP logoThe Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) will continue its efforts to protect the region from invasive species — one of the greatest environmental threats facing the Adirondacks — under a new, multi-year contract with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) funded through the Environmental Protection Fund. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 7, 2019

Lake George Jefferson Project Issues Report

jefferson project annual reportThe Jefferson Project at Lake George has published its latest Annual Report, declaring that its environmental data gathering and analytics have made Lake George “The Smartest Lake in the World.”

The report says the Jefferson Project has now deployed more than 500 Smart Sensors in and around the lake to monitor physical, chemical and biological conditions that signal emerging threats and help track the progress of lake protection initiatives. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Dealing with the Environmental Effects of Flooding

Heavy rain has led to historic flooding in parts of the Adirondacks.  Waters are receding, but the clean up and repairs will continue for some time as Adirondackers return to flooded homes and camps.  Some will return to flooded outbuildings, destroyed docks and shoreline changes.

Building owners with flooded basements should check for sheens or odors from gasoline, oil or substances that may have leaked from fuel oil storage tanks, furnaces or motorized equipment before pumping out water. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 4, 2019

Adirondack Flooding: An Update And Primer

Heavy rain has led to historic flooding in parts of the Adirondacks. Lakes and ponds are brimming and rivers and streams swollen with cold and fast water. The most affected areas include Hamilton, Herkimer, Warren and Essex counties, including the western slopes of the Champlain and Lake George Valleys.

At least one person lost their life driving into a flooded roadway and flooding continues to occur in some lowland areas, including along the Schroon River.  State Roads are closed in several places, and numerous secondary roads remain closed. Some buildings and other structures have been destroyed, and many more are flooded. You can find the latest road closure information for Routes 30 and 8 at 511ny.org » Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 3, 2019

Climate Change Impacting Adirondack Boreal Birds

Two new scientific studies recently released by Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute (PSC AWI) and Shingle Shanty Preserve and Research Station (SSPRS) have detected continuing patterns of decline in boreal birds in the Adirondacks.

The authors examined avian community changes in lowland boreal habitats and the impacts that temperature and precipitation have on long-term occupancy patterns of boreal birds. Both peer-reviewed papers were recently published in the scientific journal PLoS One. The studies build on more than a decade of monitoring boreal bird populations in lowland boreal habitat. » Continue Reading.


Friday, November 1, 2019

Historic Flooding In The Adirondacks

Heavy rain overnight on Halloween has led to historic flooding in parts of the Adirondacks Friday, Nov. 1, 2019.

There has been widespread flooding and numerous roads have been closed across Hamilton, Herkimer, Warren and Essex counties, including the western slopes of the Champlain and Lake George Valleys. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Invasive Ash Borer Closing In On Adirondack Park

emerald ash borer photo courtesy DECThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that emerald ash borer (EAB) has been confirmed in two locations in Jefferson County. A sample collected from a tree in the city of Watertown on South Massey Street was positively identified by the Cornell University Insect Diagnostic Lab.

The sample was taken in cooperation with the City of Watertown Planning Department and Department of Public Works. A second location was confirmed in the village of Clayton. » Continue Reading.