Monday, October 10, 2022

Invasive Species at Our Door: Adirondack Invasive Species Summit set for Oct. 19

BLUE MOUNTAIN LAKE—A summit to address two invasive species that are a threat to the Adirondacks will include a discussion on new research that shows a link between hydrilla and the death of eagles in the Southeastern United States. The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program will host a free symposium, “Invasive Species at our Door: Adirondack Invasive Species Summit,” from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 19 at Adirondack Experience, the Museum on Blue Mountain Lake. The event will cover two species that could dramatically impact Adirondack forests and freshwater ecosystems: hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), a forest pest, and hydrilla, an aquatic invasive plant.

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Sunday, October 9, 2022

Trout tails: In search of native strains

Trout Power anglers searching for brook trout DNA samples near Sagamore Lake this summer.

When the volunteers of Trout Power get together for a fishing weekend, they are more interested in a small clip of fish fin than a trophy specimen. They aren’t looking for the biggest or most beautiful trout.

They are looking for genetic information, and they have found it. The nonprofit organization is working with genetics researchers to expand our understanding of native trout strains scattered throughout the park. The strains show minimal mixing with stocked trout and have survived centuries of threats like acid rain and game fishing. The genetic diversity the anglers and researchers are finding, more robust than previously understood, may be a key weapon against the growing threat of climate change, which could warm water temperatures to level uninhabitable for cold-water fish like brook trout.

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Sunday, October 9, 2022

John Brown Lives! receives $26,500 from Parks and Trails New York to expand strategic planning initiatives

On October 6, Senator Dan Stec (R,C-Queensbury) joined several state and regional representatives and John Brown Lives! Executive Director Martha Swan at a press conference and check presentation on the John Brown Farm State Historic Site in Lake Placid. John Brown Lives!, which runs programs year-round dedicated to preserving and advancing the legacy and mission of the famed abolitionist, received a $26,500 check from Parks and Trails New York to advance its strategic planning initiatives.

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Saturday, October 8, 2022

Sustainable Poke-O-Moonshine trail nears completion 

champlain valleyChesterfield, NY — Following a month of work by ADK’s (Adirondack Mountain Club’s) professional trail crew, a sustainably-designed reroute of Poke-O-Moonshine’s Ranger Trail is one step closer to completion. A complete overhaul of one of two approaches to the summit, the project has taken eight years to date and involved several trail building organizations. ADK has worked there for seven of those years.

“We are proud to play such a major role in building a safe and sustainable trail up Poke-O-Moonshine,” said Charlotte Staats, ADK Trails Manager. “Well-built trails protect ecosystems by keeping hikers on a safe, navigable path and away from surrounding vegetation. By investing in projects like this one, we ensure that people can explore the Adirondack Park in a way that protects the surrounding environment.”

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Thursday, October 6, 2022

ADK connects kids to nature through Marie L. Haberl School Outreach Program

Lake Placid, NY —ADK (Adirondack Mountain Club) has started its 19th year of connecting kids to nature through Marie L. Haberl School Outreach Program: Three Seasons at Heart Lake. Last week, ADK staff began welcoming students to Heart Lake by introducing them to the wonders and science of fall foliage on a hike up Mt. Jo.

Since the program was founded in 2003, ADK has partnered with elementary schools around the Adirondack Park, many of which represent underserved communities, and served over 4,000 students. This year’s cohort includes 12 schools and 355 students.

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Tuesday, October 4, 2022

DEC Recreation Highlight: Sharing Trails with Hunters & Trappers

 

Hunting and trapping seasons are beginning to open throughout New York State. These activities are enjoyed by many as forms of recreation and a means of providing for their families. These activities can also benefit forest ecosystems by helping maintain healthy animal populations while reducing nuisance wildlife issues and, in some cases, decreasing the transmission of wildlife diseases. Whether you are a hunter, trapper, or just enjoy getting outdoors in the fall, learning how to share public lands with other users will help keep you and fellow visitors safe.

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Monday, October 3, 2022

The end of winter?

The view from the roof of the "silo" science station on the summit of Whiteface on Sept. 21. Photo by Zachary Matson

In a new paper on how climate change is impacting the Adirondacks, Paul Smith’s College researchers waited until their last paragraph to raise a term that has stayed with me: the demise of winter.

It’s practically an aside in the paper’s concluding discussion.

“Today’s annual crossing and re-crossing of the thermal threshold between solid and liquid water has profound effects on cultures and ecosystems alike, and the eventual loss of that transition – i.e. the demise of winter – could produce the greatest climate-driven changes in the region,” they wrote.

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Sunday, October 2, 2022

Heating With Wood This Winter 

I need to preface this article by assuring readers that, contrary to what many people are saying, New York State is not considering passing legislation that would prohibit burning wood or woody biomass products (pellets, scrap wood, sawmill and forest residues) at this time. There is a draft-plan, however, in which the state Climate Action Council’s advisory panel sets out scenarios for an 85% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, with overall wood use decreasing within that time frame.

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Sunday, October 2, 2022

DEC Announces Start of Several Hunting Seasons Across New York State

On Tuesday, September 27, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced the beginning of several hunting seasons in New York, including bowhunting for bear and deer in the Northern and Southern zones and the start of small game hunting seasons statewide.

“This is an exciting time of year for hunters who now have an opportunity to head afield and experience the tremendous hunting opportunities here in New York for both big and small game,” Commissioner Seggos said. “In addition, the late summer weather, fall foliage, and extended hunting hours combine to create outstanding conditions for new and experienced hunters who enjoy the sport.”

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Saturday, October 1, 2022

Adirondack Loon Celebration set for Oct. 9 at Paul Smith’s VIC

Saranac Lake, NY– The Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation invites one and all to celebrate Common Loons, one of the most fascinating Adirondack icons, at the Paul Smith’s College VIC (8023 NYS Rte. 30) from 1 to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, October 9. This free, fun-filled day will feature activities for the whole family, including:

 

1-4:30 pm: Meet the Adirondack Loon Center staff, enjoy delicious food by Adirondack BBQ ($), a silent auction featuring beautiful loon-related items, a scavenger hunt, and children’s crafts.

1:00 pm: Poetry Reading and Book Signing by Yvona Fast, author of Loon Summer

1:15 pmLoon Calling Contest

2:00 pm: Presentation by Jennifer Denny: A Year in the Life of a Loon

2:30-3:30 pm: Presentation by Dr. Jay Mager: A Light Lesson in Loon Music

3:30-4:30 pm: Music by Sara Milonovich and Greg Anderson

4:30 pm: Hornbeck Canoe raffle drawing

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Saturday, October 1, 2022

DEC Finds New Exotic Pest Affecting Elm Trees in St. Lawrence County

On September 26, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced that the elm zigzag sawfly (Aproceros leucopoda) was detected for the first time in New York State at three locations in St. Lawrence County, including Wilson Hill Wildlife Management Area, Brasher State Forest, and Lost Nation State Forest. This exotic pest feeds exclusively on elm trees and can cause severe defoliation, branch dieback, and crown thinning. Although the sawfly has not yet been shown to cause tree mortality, repeated defoliation by established sawfly populations would put added stress on native elm trees already heavily impacted by Dutch elm disease.

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Thursday, September 29, 2022

HABs plans

DEC scientist and section chief Lauren Townley presents an update on the state's HABs action plan at a Lake George Park Commission meeting in Bolton on Tuesday. Photo by Zachary Matson

Harmful algal blooms were first confirmed on Lake George in October 2020, suspected to have been spurred on by a warm, dry fall.

With Lake George residents and advocates keeping a careful eye on the lake, DEC scientist Lauren Townley (pictured here) updated the Lake George Park Commission on the state’s latest HABs action plan for Lake George, which was updated in August. She shared the update in Bolton at the Lake George Park Commission’s first in-person meeting since prior to the pandemic.

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Thursday, September 29, 2022

Adirondack Council thanks NYS Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus for successful session

adirondack council new logoLAKE PLACID, N.Y. – Adirondack Council today thanked the members of the NYS Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus for again holding its fall retreat inside the Adirondack Park and for the amazing list of accomplishments achieved in partnership with the Adirondack Council and other conservation organizations over the past year.

The caucus held its fall retreat in Lake Placid in 2021, which was the first time it held its annual retreat outside of Albany.  The Council held a reception this year at Smoke Signals restaurant to honor caucus achievements with friends and supporters on the eve of their return to the Adirondacks.

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Wednesday, September 28, 2022

Paul Smith’s VIC to host fall lecture series in October

The fall lecture series will be held at the Paul Smith’s College VIC again this October.

The series was designed to initiate important discussions relevant to the Adirondacks, allowing students at Paul Smith’s College and North Country Community College to interact with leaders in environmental science, policy and social issues. Lectures are open to all and the diversity in the audience has been important to the discussion and success of the series. Lectures were well attended last year and generated significant campus and community involvement and support. Lectures are archived for viewing on the Paul Smith’s College VIC YouTube channel.

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Tuesday, September 27, 2022

APA approved Clifton solar project, and a fall hike

hadley mountain fire tower

Last week the Adirondack Park Agency approved a 20-megawatt solar project on the former Benson Mines’s tailings pile in the Town of Clifton. It is the state’s first “build ready” solar project. There are still a handful of other permits the state needs to acquire before it can hold an auction and turn the project over to a solar developer. But, it looks like the Adirondacks is one step closer to hosting a large renewable energy project.

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