Tuesday, July 28, 2020

Tips for reducing your plastic waste

As the Plastic Free July challenge winds down, DEC has an update on how their participants are faring with their own personal goals. Here are some of the creative things they have been doing:

Kayla’s Goal: Reduce plastic meal packaging, beverage jugs, and toiletries

“One of my goals during Plastic Free July was finding and using sunscreen that doesn’t come in a plastic tube or bottle. After a lot of research I found the choices were limited, so I decided to contact sunscreen companies to start a conversation about their packaging. I personalized and tailored each correspondence, making sure to research the company beforehand to include persuasive facts about their sustainability practices and sunscreen usage facts in general. I contacted…

  • Four major sunscreen brands and another major skin care brand that offers sunscreen and focuses on sustainability. Within a few hours, I received general replies from three of these companies. A few days later I received a similar reply from the fourth company.
  • A smaller sunscreen company with sustainability in mind. They informed me of positive strides they’ve made with their sunscreen containers, such as incorporating post-consumer recycled content, and challenges they faced in moving away from plastic packaging. I now plan to delve into this further as it may be part of the reason why plastic packaging is so prevalent for sunscreen. They were also open to future suggestions about this topic.
  • A small business that offers plastic free options. They don’t sell sunscreen yet but informed me of their interest in reducing their plastic use potentially through offering a refill option.

Prior to this experience, I had never directly contacted a company about environmental issues and found it to be inspiring, especially when I heard back, and would encourage others to do the same. I always thought, ‘they’ll never listen to me’, but my experience showed me companies are willing to listen and share thoughts and experiences to start a conversation in an effort to make positive changes for the future of our environment.”

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Monday, July 27, 2020

Adirondack invasive program focuses on knotweed

Each summer, the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) receives calls from landowners across the Park who want to know how to manage invasive species on their property. The most common question is, “how do I manage that ‘bamboo’?” Most often the plant in question is not bamboo, it is one of three species of knotweed that grow in the Adirondacks. 

To help community members learn how to identify these destructive invasive plants, prevent their spread, and manage infestations on their property, APIPP is hosting a free virtual learning event on Thursday, July 30 at 10 am. Visit www.ADKinvasives.com/Events to RSVP.

» Continue Reading.


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Sunday, July 26, 2020

DEC Announces Agreement to Protect Grasse River Habitat

Grasse RiverArconic to Provide More Than $2.25 Million to Protect and Restore Habitat, Including Critically Important Freshwater Mussels
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos has announced a landmark agreement (PDF) between DEC and Arconic, Inc. Under the agreement, Arconic will provide more than $2.25 million to protect and restore critical habitat at the Grasse River Federal Superfund site in Massena. Arconic is required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to clean up contamination in the Grasse River, but was not being held to New York State’s stringent standards for habitat protection, driving DEC to reach this agreement and help save critically important freshwater mussels and other natural resources.

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Saturday, July 25, 2020

Home Composting 101

Vermicomposting uses worms to decompose waste courtesy Wikimedia user ChristopheFinotThe summer weather isn’t the only thing heating up, so is your compost pile. Unlike our garbage or recycling, composting allows us to directly manage our own wasted food and turn those food scraps into compost. Composting takes some care; add your greens, browns, water and air. Learn more about home composting whether you’re a beginner or a bit more experienced.

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Saturday, July 25, 2020

Adirondack Land Trust to Host Virtual Conservation Series

The Adirondack Land Trust has announced three live, virtual programs to be held in August. The programs will feature land-protection staff, scientists studying the Adirondack Forests, and a conservation intern who will discuss the ups and downs of conservation fieldwork during COVID-19. The events will be free and open to the public. If you wish to register, or view more information you may do so by visiting the Adirondack land Trust Website.

The schedule is as follows:

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Thursday, July 23, 2020

Adirondack groups cheer passing of road salt reduction bill

road salt The NYS Senate granted final approval Thursday to a bi-partisan bill that would help reduce road salt pollution and protect drinking water in the Adirondack Park.

The legislation creates an Adirondack Road Salt Reduction Task Force and Pilot Program. If approved by the Governor, the new law would establish a salt-reduction pilot program from October 2021 through 2024 to test alternative measures already shown to work better and cost less than current winter road maintenance practices.  Highway safety would remain the top priority.

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Thursday, July 23, 2020

Town of Bolton and LGLC to Purchase Bradley’s Lookout

The Town of Bolton and the Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC) have announced their intention to purchase a 62 acre parcel of land in the town known as Bradley’s Lookout. The Town will purchase the property from the LGLC upon completion of their acquisition expected to occur late this summer. The property will be encumbered by a conservation easement held by the LGLC.

The Hawkins family has owned the 62+/- acre property known as “Bradley’s Lookout” in Bolton since the 1970’s. The property contains 7 acres of wetlands, including half of the pond that is located on the Town of Bolton’s Community Center property. The remainder of the land is wooded, including many stands of healthy hemlocks. The land includes a 1000-foot summit that offers views of Lake George including Dome Island as well as Black Mountain, Shelving Rock, and the Sagamore. The name comes from the historical use of the property, as the Bradley family who ran a horse-riding business in town, brought their horses up the summit to allow visitors to enjoy the views.

Photo provided: View from Bradley’s lookout of Lake George

 


Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Plastic Free July: Participants share their tips for reducing waste

From the NYS DEC: A sampling of ways participants in Plastic Free July are looking for ways to reduce their waste and keep more plastic packaging and products out of the waste stream.

Do you have any tips to share? Add them in the comments section below!

Kayla’s Goal: Reduce plastic meal packaging, beverage jugs, and toiletries
To gear up for Plastic Free July, Kayla kicked things off by making sure she had the items on hand she’d need to accomplish her goals.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Responding To Call For Help, LGA Partners With Putnam To Solve Issue

By Patrick Dowd

Polluted stormwater isn’t just a problem in developed areas around Lake George. Just last week Lake George Association staff worked with the Town of Putnam’s Highway Superintendent, Gary Treadway, to implement a solution that stems the flow of polluted stormwater and protects the Lake’s water quality.

A small grassy swale (designed to capture stormwater) adjacent to the Town of Putnam Fire Department’s Lake access area in Glenburnie (northern Washington County) was filled to capacity with sediment, causing polluted stormwater to run into the lake and onto the neighbor’s dock and property.

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Tuesday, July 21, 2020

DEC Releases Final Plans to Improve Saranac River’s Imperial Mills Dam

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Acting Regional Director Joe Zalewski today announced the release of final plans to improve the Imperial Mills Dam, including installing a fish ladder to provide for passage of landlocked Atlantic salmon and modifying the dam to bring it into compliance with dam safety regulations. The Imperial Mills Dam, also known as the Main Mill Dam, is located on the Saranac River approximately 3.2 miles upstream from Lake Champlain, in the city of Plattsburgh, Clinton County.

 

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Saturday, July 18, 2020

It’s Debatable: Restore Mother Nature Bond Act

From the July/August 2020 issue of Adirondack Explorer, editors asked the question: “Is now the right time for New York to move forward with the Restore Mother Nature Bond Act?”
Below is the “YES” response, from John Sheehan of the Adirondack Council and “NO,” from Roger Dziengelski, retired woodlands manager, chief forester and senior vice president for Finch Paper in Glens Falls.
Weigh in with your thoughts in the comments section!

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Monitoring for European Cherry Fruit Fly – You Can Help

I love cherries! Especially sweet cherries. They’re delicious fresh, high in fiber, and loaded with vitamins, minerals, and beneficial antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds, which may lower your risk of developing certain cancers, heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and/or obesity.

Growing consumer education about the antioxidant health benefits of cherries appears to be creating increased demand for the fruit. Domestic cherry consumption in the United States is now around 2 pounds per person per year.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Water, water everywhere, but still the need to conserve

Colleen rows the boat on Long Lake by Alexandra RoalsvigWhile recent rains have helped some parts of the Adirondacks, other parts are stuck in a dry spell that began with the mild winter.

On Tuesday, the Town of Long Lake told residents to stop washing their cars and watering their lawns to conserve water.

Long Lake’s water superintendent, Keith Austin, said a dry spell left the town unable to keep up with current demand. The system serves about 800 full-time residents and a seasonal population of 2,000 people in a typical year.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 12, 2020

Reducing Your Waste this Summer: Tips from the DEC

Summer is the time for outdoor barbeques, picnics and parties, and while you are having fun the DEC wants to remind us to reduce, reuse, and recycle our waste correctly this summer.

They’ve released a variety of tips and suggestions in their weekly newsletter to this end. To reduce waste, opt for reusable plates, cups, cutlery and napkins as opposed to the typical solo cups and paper pates for your next outdoor feast. You can learn to make your own drinks as well as opposed to using pre-mixed beverages that come in bulky plastic containers.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, July 10, 2020

Sparking widespread interest in composting

Editor’s note: This article is reprinted with permission and first appeared here

Soon, large-scale producers of food waste in NYS will be required to either compost or donate their food waste to food pantries. Like many other states, my guess is that it’s just a matter of time before all landfilling of food wastes will be banned in New York State. Vermont banned residential food waste from landfills this year.

Is it possible to compost everything that comes out of commercial and residential kitchens? Absolutely. Some of you in the Adirondacks have been doing this successfully for decades. However, incorporating meat and dairy into compost systems can be tricky. Until recently.

» Continue Reading.



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