Sunday, January 26, 2020

Adirondack Council Reviews Gov’s Budget Plans

NYS capital buildingThe Adirondack Council applauded Gov. Andrew Cuomo for proposing State Budget funding that will combat climate change, protect clean water and preserve Wilderness, build more resilient trails and make the park more welcoming place for all state residents.

On top of the newly announced $3-billion Restore Mother Nature Bond Act proposal, the Governor’s plan adds another $500 million investment in clean water project funding, in addition to the $500 million previously announced for this year’s budget. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 22, 2020

State Releases Ambitious Electric Vehicle Charging Station Plan

Rick Gorleski of PlugIn Stations Online installs an electric vehicle charging station at the Hotel SaranacThis week, the New York Department of Public Service released a “make ready” incentive plan for utilities to spend more than a half-billion dollars in workplace and public electric vehicle charging stations.

This new proposal comes after more than a year of advocacy from a coalition of automakers, bus manufacturers, EV charging service providers, labor groups, business associations, environmental justice organizations, environmental NGOs, and other organizations. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 19, 2020

The Great Recession Changed Our Development Landscape

News came from New England’s north woods last fall that a large residential and commercial development on 17,000-acres near Maine’s Moosehead Lake conceived before the Great Recession has not begun and would not move forward.

The APA-permitted Adirondack Club and Resort near Tupper Lake has also not commenced, largely for economic reasons. The developer, Preserve Associates, is being foreclosed upon, their creditors are pressing for relief, and the new mortgage holders (Crossroads LLC) are trying to figure out what to do once they acquire the 6,200 acres.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 19, 2020

New Adirondack Land Trust Board Members

adirondack land trust new board membersThe Adirondack Land Trust has announced the addition of three new board members who bring expertise in private land conservation, farmland access for young farmers, and communications.

The mission of the Adirondack Land Trust is to forever conserve the forests, farmlands, waters and wild places that advance the quality of life of our communities and the ecological integrity of the Adirondacks. The land trust has protected 26,628 acres since its founding in 1984. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 18, 2020

Hudson Data Jam Competition for Students

hudson data jam competitionThe Hudson River Valley has been intensely studied by scientists for decades, but many of the river’s science stories are not well known by the people who call the Hudson home.

Once again, Cary Institute educators are challenging middle school and high school students to creatively tell the stories of Hudson Valley environmental data in its annual Hudson Data Jam competition. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, January 16, 2020

Conservancy Protects Twin Pines Property in Bolton

One of the streams that cross the newly protected propertyThe Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC) closed on the purchase of 212 acres in the Town of Bolton on December 20, 2019. The property was part the Twin Pines Resort owned by the McGurl family. The resort is expected to be unaffected by the sale. The LGLC will hold the property until the Town of Bolton is able to purchase it from LGLC encumbered with a conservation easement. This transfer is expected to take place in early 2020.

The property includes about 20 acres of wetlands and 3,000 feet of stream corridor, and is adjacent to the popular Cat and Thomas Mountains Preserve owned by the New York State Department of Conservation (NYSDEC). » Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 11, 2020

St. Lawrence River Watershed Online Survey

St Lawrence River Watershed Project

The St. Lawrence Watershed lies at the border of New York State and Canada. The St. Lawrence River serves as the gateway between the North Atlantic and the Great Lakes. At its most downstream point in the United States, the Saint Lawrence drains an area of nearly 300,000 square miles.

The area within New York State covered by the watershed revitalization plan includes a 5,600-square-mile region that spans the Northern and Western Adirondacks and the lake plains of the St. Lawrence Valley, including the villages and cities of Clayton, Alexandria Bay, Theresa, Potsdam, Canton, Tupper Lake, Paul Smith’s, Ogdensburg, Malone, and Massena. » Continue Reading.


Friday, January 10, 2020

Cuomo’s $3B Restore Mother Nature Bond Act Is A Big Deal

Governor Andrew Cuomo’s 2020 State of the State speech included two big pieces of good news for the Adirondack Park.

The first major highlight was his proposal for a $3 Billion Restore Mother Nature Bond Act that will support a variety of pressing environmental and climate change challenges across New York. This proposal is the first listed in the 2020 State of the State book that accompanied the speech.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 7, 2020

State Legislature EnCon Committee Chairs Talk Priorities

todd steven willie

The following essay was authored by Assemblyman Steven Englebright and State Senator Todd Kaminsky.

The 2019 legislative session was a great one for New York’s environment. As the chairs of the Environmental Conservation Committees in both houses, we were pleased to talk with Adirondack residents and visitors about the session in late September when we came to the park to discuss next year’s agenda.

The Adirondacks aren’t just New York’s largest park, they are a national treasure and a shining example of long-term conservation that serves as a model for the world. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 1, 2020

2020 Marks DEC’s 50th Anniversary

Nelson Rockefeller signing legislationThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) was established in 1970 on the first-ever Earth Day.

In the 50 years since, Adirondackers have seen a revolution in the way we interact with our environment. The Clean Air Act was passed in 1970; in 1971 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was established, followed by the passage of the Clean Water Act in 1972. The Adirondack Park Agency Act was passed in 1971, and the State’s Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQR) in 1980, the same year as the Superfund Law. In 1993 the Environmental Protection Fund was established.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, December 30, 2019

Siamese Ponds Wilderness Survey Underway

siamese ponds surveyA student at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry is conducting a capstone project about daily use of Siamese Ponds Wilderness. The research is focused on scenic quality of wilderness and wilderness use by residents and visitors.

The survey is anonymous and can be found here.


Tuesday, December 24, 2019

Natural Christmas Tree Decorations

“What a horrifyingly garish sight,” I said to my friend as we surveyed my Christmas tree last year. We had just finished decorating it and my eyes were sending messages to my brain, like, “Hey, this is really tacky.”

Truth is, the décor I had accumulated after years of city dwelling in my sassy twenties looked awfully out of place in my humble Vermont cabin. What I once thought dazzling – glitter-coated icicles, a miniature disco ball, a purple-feathered bird with jeweled eyes, flocks of shiny gold and green balls – now looked as out of place as a pink flamingo at my bird feeder. Even the duck decoy my great uncle carved seemed to give the gaudy fiasco an alarmed stare. Such a tree no longer belonged in my world. » Continue Reading.


Friday, December 20, 2019

Giving More When We Need Less

One of the things I like the most about the holidays, besides the fact that I get to decorate my house with Victorian gaudiness, is that people don’t question other people’s need for food and gifts.

We give to Toys for Tots, Holiday Helpers, Tri-Lakes Humane Society, and “run” Turkey Trots for food pantries. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, December 19, 2019

Viewpoint: Rethink Boreas Ponds Motor Vehicle Access

Large washout on Gulf Brook RoadThe Adirondack Park Agency’s decision to classify the magnificent Boreas Ponds Tract to authorize motorized use of Gulf Brook Road is a done deal.

The State Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC’s) management plan to improve that road, establish parking, and allow permitted cars to drive to within a couple hundred yards of the Boreas Ponds is in the implementation phase.

In other words, the governmental custodians of the Boreas Tract will be allowing vehicular access deep into the Boreas Tract. Now the only question is whether the Adirondacks itself will allow vehicular access deep into the Boreas Tract. I would not be too sure about that. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, December 15, 2019

Ausable River Association To Replace Otis Brook Culvert

culvert on Otis Brook in JayThe Ausable River Association (AsRA) has been awarded a $100,000 Best Management Practices for Pollution Reduction grant from the Lake Champlain Basin Program (LCBP).

The funding supports replacement of an undersized and failing culvert on Otis Brook in Jay, NY. This will be AsRA’s sixth installation of a Climate-Ready-Culvert and is part of their wider effort to restore stream health by reducing sedimentation of waterways, to improve wildlife habitat, and to create flood resilience for communities in the Ausable watershed. » Continue Reading.