Monday, May 25, 2020

Spring Cleaning: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

It is that time of year again where spring cleaning is on the forefront of everyone’s minds. But before you begin, the DEC wants to remind us how important it is that you properly recycle everything instead of just throwing it away.

It is certainly easier to just toss everything, but don’t forget that most everything requires limited natural resources to produce, and in the efforts of conservation, the DEC wants to share some tips to reduce the amount of waste generated this spring-cleaning season.

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Friday, May 22, 2020

Boat inspection program starts up this weekend

Adirondack Watershed Institute steward watches over the Second Pond boat launch near Saranac LakeStarting this Memorial Day Weekend, Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute’s (PSC AWI) Stewardship Program will begin its work at public boat launches throughout the Adirondacks.

In partnership with NYS’s Department of Environmental Conservation, boat stewards will be assisting to CLEAN. DRAIN. DRY boats in the essential work to help protect the state’s waters from aquatic invasive species like hydrilla, water chestnut, and spiny waterflea.

In 2019, stewards talked with more than 250,000 water recreationists about aquatic invasive species and what can be done to prevent their spread. They also kept a lookout for invasive species at the waterbodies where they worked.

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Tuesday, May 19, 2020

DEC Environmental Notice Bulletin: Projects in Clinton, Franklin counties

Public Comment Period

DEC releases a weekly Environmental Notice Bulletin (ENB), containing notices required by environmental laws including notices of complete applications under the Uniform Procedures Act, notices under the NYS Environmental Quality Act (SEQR) regulations, notices of DEC hearings, and more. Below is a summary of recent relevant notices and comment periods for the Adirondack region.

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Tuesday, May 19, 2020

“Forests Adrift” – A virtual book talk

Dr. Charlie Canham, a forest ecologist with the Cary Institute of Ecosystems Studies will be discussing his new book: “Forests Adrift: Currents Shaping the Future of Northeastern Trees” in a conversation with Cary President Dr. Joshua Ginsberg.

The event, taking place at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 21, will be a virtual conversation with time allotted for an audience Q&A.

The book covers the history of northeastern forests, their resilience to change and looming threats that will determine their future and goes into how the forests have changed over time with the arrival of European settlers.

Current conditions and science-based forecasting on how the forests will adapt to logging, fire suppression, disease, pollution, invasive species, and climate change will also be covered.

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Monday, May 18, 2020

Turtles on the move

painted turtle near edge of raodBe on alert for turtles crossing the road: Our native turtles are on the move in May and June seeking sandy areas or loose soil to lay their eggs. In New York, thousands of turtles are killed each year when they are struck by vehicles as they migrate to their nesting areas.

What you can do to help:

  • If you see a turtle on the road, please give turtles “a brake”. Slow down to avoid hitting it with your car.
  • If you can safely stop your vehicle, please consider moving it to the shoulder on the side of the road in the direction it was facing.
  • Picking the turtle up by its tail may frighten or injure it. You can pick up most turtles by the sides of the shell.
  • Use caution when moving snapping turtles; either pick her up at the rear of the shell near the tail using two hands, or slide a car mat under the turtle to drag her across the road.
  • Please do not take turtles home. All native turtles are protected by law and cannot be kept without a permit. All 11 species of land turtles that are native to New York are declining.

Note to anglers: Here are some tips for what to do if you snag a turtle while fishing.


Saturday, May 16, 2020

Lake Placid Land Conservancy applies for accreditation

lake placid land conservancyThe Lake Placid Land Conservancy is applying for accreditation with the Land Trust Alliance, a program which recognizes conservation organizations that meet a national set of standards for protecting and conserving natural places and working lands.

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Thursday, May 14, 2020

TNC welcomes two new staffers

The Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Chapter is pleased to announce the addition of two new team members: Amanda Dunham Ely has joined the team as communications and community engagement manager, and Emily-Bell Dinan has joined as education and communications coordinator for the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP). 

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Monday, May 11, 2020

Wild Center hosts climate change summit for teachers

The Wild Center is planning a virtual “Stay-In-stitute” for Climate Change Education.

Scheduled for  July 22-24, from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., the institute aims to bring together both middle and high school teachers from across the country and from a variety of disciplines, to engage in an active exploration of climate change, and the best educational practices related to it.

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Saturday, May 9, 2020

New York’s state symbols: how many can you identify?

Did you know that garnet is the official mineral of New York State? Or that the nine spotted lady beetle, or ladybug, is the official insect? These natural symbols celebrate some of what makes New York a special place to live. Learn about all 11 Symbols of New York and then play a game of I Spy the next time you head outside to #recreatelocal. How many of the 11 symbols can you find?

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Friday, May 1, 2020

Quarantine reads: More recommended Adirondack reading

Thanks to all who responded to our call for recommended Adirondack, environmental and nature-themed reading to pass the time in COVID-19 quarantine.

Here’s the original post

We also reached out to a handful of Almanack contributors to ask for their input and here’s some additional suggestions to add to the list:

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Friday, May 1, 2020

Green Amendment Webinar Series

Adirondack Mountain Club PhotoIn 2019, New York Legislators passed a proposed amendment to the New York State Constitution, acknowledging that clean air, water, and a healthy environment are a fundamental right. The passage of bill S 2072/A 2064 was the first step in making this Green Amendment into law, and upon a successful passage come 2021, the citizens of New York will have the opportunity to vote on it.
This coming May, Cathy Pedler of the Adirondack Mountain Club, partnered with Environmental Advocates of New York and Green Amendments for The Generations, are hosting a free 3-part webinar series covering the Green Amendment.

Click the following links to register:

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Wednesday, April 29, 2020

‘Love Your ADK’ campaign aims to inspire stewardship

A new campaign aims to educate and inspire users of the Adirondack Park to recreation in an environmentally responsible way. The “Love Your ADK pledge” and corresponding website has been organized and launched in a collaboration of the Adirondack Mountain Club, Adirondack Council, New York Department of Environmental Conservation, and the Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST).

The Pledge is a list of eight values which tourists, visitors, and residents are asked to consider while in the Adirondacks. Taking the pledge indicates the user’s commitment to follow the principles of the pledge, to support responsible environmentally friendly recreation, and to learn and follow “Leave No Trace” guidelines.

To participate in the pledge and learn more, go to https://www.loveyouradk.org/pledge


Monday, April 27, 2020

Micro-grant awards focus on farmers coping with COVID, climate change

farmers marketThe Adirondack Council awarded 10 micro-grants totaling over $32,000  to local farmers. According to a press release, the grants are an effort to address the greatest short-term and long-term threats to public health and the Adirondack Park: COVID-19 and climate change.

“COVID-19 and climate change each have the potential to devastate Adirondack communities,” says Adirondack Council Conservation Associate Jackie Bowen, the coordinator of the grant program alongside the Essex Farm Institute. In some cases, farms/food producers need to prepare more serve-at-home meals…others need equipment and funding to protect and sustain their employees who work in urban farmers markets.

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Thursday, April 23, 2020

Reading in Place

Good Books from Wild Places to Help Us Through Bad Times

Entodon cladorrhizans. ©Northern Forest Atlas Foundation

If you must “shelter in place”, the North Country is a good place to do so.  Those of us fortunate to live in New York’s great Adirondack Park are already accustomed to “social distancing”, and generally have ample space to get fresh air and exercise – thanks to the good work of the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation and regional land trusts in protecting millions of acres of wild lands and waters. We are also fortunate to have thousands of brave neighbors continuing to go to work to provide us essentials, like groceries, heating fuel, and health care.

Still, even we lucky Adirondackers – nearly as much as our fellow New Yorkers down-state wishing they could be up here – likely have more time alone now than we usually have.  Quiet time affords us chances to read. Here is a quick list of books of regional interest and/or environmental bent that I’d suggest to neighbors sheltered at home through this upsetting pandemic.

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Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Online activities for Earth Day

Makeboro Trailhead courtesy The Nature Conservancy Erika BaileyThe Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Chapter has shared the following activities for joining in the online festivities on this 50th anniversary of Earth Day:

Learn About Nature: some parents are finding it stressful to take on the roles of their teachers while the schools are closed, but the NCAC has created a Nature Lab to help children and parents alike to take part in nature related activities, in turn learning the science behind nature and what we can do to preserve it. View the Nature Lab’s resources for K-12 students here.

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