Monday, April 10, 2017

Remote Healthcare Monitoring in the Adirondacks

Adirondack Health and Health Recovery Solutions (HRS) have partnered to provide remote monitoring and videoconferencing services throughout the North Country region of New York State. Adirondack Health plans to have HRS integrated with Hixny’s health information exchange to serve patients in their homes. The exchange provides electronic access to patients’ records.

HRS uses a 4G-enabled tablet equipped with their software and integrated with Bluetooth devices to capture vital signs and provide high risk-alerts. It also provides educational videos, two-way videoconferencing for family members and clinicians, and assistance with medication management. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 10, 2017

Residential Brush Burning Prohibited Through May 14

Residential brush burning is prohibited through May 14 across New York State.

Due to the lack of snow cover over much of the state and with rising temperatures forecast for the coming weeks, conditions for wildfires could be heightened. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 9, 2017

Younger Adirondackers Find A Place To Call Home

Tyler Socash on Wright PeakIn 2015, Old Forge native Tyler Socash decided to take the money he had been saving for a car and spend it on something more experiential: three long-distance hiking trips.

Starting in August, he ended up hiking seven thousand miles as he finished the Pacific Crest Trail, Te-araroa (Long Pathway) in New Zealand, and the Appalachian Trail. After the yearlong trip, the thirty-year-old came home to the Adirondacks, where he returned to a former employer, the Adirondack Mountain Club, as a wilderness trip leader. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Dan Plumley: EPA Cuts, Deregulation Imperil the Adirondack Park

EPA and Trump BudgetThe current crisis of anti-environmental leadership at the federal level under the Trump Administration has potentially far reaching implications here at home for New York’s Adirondack Park. Taken as a whole, these threats to New York State and the Adirondack Park could degrade or imperil natural resource integrity and environmental sustainability over the long-term.

Threats include:

o proposed draconian cuts to the budget and professional staffing of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and elimination of climate research under various agencies;

o proposed weakening or elimination of regulations facing coal burning, “tall stack” polluting industries and degraded water quality protections. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 4, 2017

DEC Seeks Volunteers to Monitor Streams and Rivers

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is recruiting volunteers for the 2017 summer sampling season to conduct water quality assessments in nearby streams and rivers as part of the Water Assessments by Volunteer Evaluators (WAVE) project.

WAVE data are used to augment the work of DEC’s Stream Biomonitoring Unit, which samples streams and rivers across the state to create an inventory of stream water quality. Volunteer monitors provide valuable information to assist in identifying healthy streams and flagging streams with potential water quality concerns. These data are included in federal and state water quality reports and help to target professional assessments and local restoration or conservation efforts where they are most needed. » Continue Reading.


Monday, April 3, 2017

Steven Engelhart: Making of a Preservationist

Steven Engelhart group

I grew up in Plattsburgh, which I think makes me a local. My father was a professor at SUNY Plattsburgh and taught the literature of Emerson and Thoreau and other late 19th  century American writers.

When a PBS documentary was made in the 1990s about the creation of the Adirondack Park, he was interviewed about Emerson and his outing to the Philosopher’s Camp in 1858. Like Emerson, he had a deep appreciation for nature, which we all inherited, but I can’t say that this translated into wilderness adventuring as a family. This I would discover later on my own. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 1, 2017

Judith Enck On EPA, Trump, and #MarchforScience

I miss Richard Nixon. I really do. Nixon established the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) forty-six years ago. Since then, the EPA has been at the forefront of issues that have improved the environment and public health. Nowhere is this more evident than in the Adirondack Park.

Remember acid rain? In the early 1970s, air pollution from fossil-fuel plants had made rain and snow so acidic it killed wildlife in hundreds of Adirondack lakes and streams. Ironically, the water looked crystal clear, but the pH balance could not sustain healthy fish and plant populations.

EPA came to the rescue. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 30, 2017

LGLC Protects Wing Pond, Land in Fort Ann

Wing Pond in AutumnThe Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC) recently purchased a 159-acre property in Bolton that includes Wing Pond, and received a donation of 15 acres in the Town of Fort Ann.

The Wing Pond property includes 750 feet of a tributary that flows into Northwest Bay, and about 15 acres of wooded and open wetlands, including Wing Pond itself. The land also offers nice views of Lake George and the potential to create recreational trails connecting to the adjoining Pole Hill Pond parcel of NYS Forest Preserve. The LGLC expects to transfer the property to New York State. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 29, 2017

David Gibson: Embracing Swamps

Long before antimalarial drugs, draining the swamp was a literal human life saver. Sometime after Earth Day 1970, when over 90 percent of the country’s swamps had already been drained, people began to appreciate by their very rarity what swamps looked like, what lived there and how they functioned and benefited society. By 2017, “draining the swamp” has been trivialized into a meaningless electoral slogan. The usage of this phrase infuriates me, but someone inside my head is reminding me to “get over it.”

The actual swamps in New York are highly diverse and on a landscape or local scale contribute vitally to natural infrastructure benefiting our human communities and the more than human world we should aspire to live with. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Comments Sought On Revised Environmental Quality Reviews

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is looking to amend the State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQR) in order to streamline the SEQR process.

DEC has scheduled the following public hearings: » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Lake George Septic Summit Set For Thursday

fund for lake georgeOn Thursday, March 30, from 8 am to 4:30 pm, The FUND for Lake George and the Town of Lake George will host Treat it Right: The first Lake George Septic Summit, at the Six Flags Great Escape Lodge, Queensbury.

This program is free to attend and designed for wastewater treatment professionals, municipal officials, contractors, and homeowners in the Lake George region. The agenda features practical solutions for onsite wastewater treatment that ensure Lake health — including latest research, technologies, systems, maintenance, matching grants, case studies, and more — will be featured. Continuing education credits are available for licensed professionals. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 23, 2017

Lessons From Standing Rock in Keene March 30th

Sacred Circle at Standing Rock protest siteSeveral speakers with direct experience in the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s and Water Protectors’ efforts to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline Project over the past year will present their personal stories in an open community dialogue event next Thursday, March 30th at the Keene Valley Congregational Church. The public is encouraged to attend.

From 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm, presentations will begin in the sanctuary space with speakers presenting their experience and perspectives of the Standing Rock movement.  Presenters include Katie Wilson, Tom Smith, Nicky Frechette and Dan Plumley – veterans and activists on the Standing Rock issue from Keene.  Mohawk traditional elder and teacher Alan Brant from Ontario, Canada will be attending and will help open the event as well as offer his indigenous perspective on this new era of Standing Rock awareness. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 20, 2017

APA, DEC Seek Comments Period on Trail Bridge Construction

A 12-foot wide snowmobile trail bridge constructed in the Moose River Plains in 2012.The Adirondack Park Agency (APA) and the Department of Environmental Conservation are holding a joint public comment period to solicit comments regarding proposed Minimum Requirements Approach Guidance.

The guidance pertains to the construction of trail bridges on State Land classified as Wild Forest Areas in the Adirondack Park.

The APA and DEC will accept comments on the Minimum Requirements Approach Guidance until April 14, 2017. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 20, 2017

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Seminar in Warrensburg

On Saturday, April 8th Cornell Cooperative Extension of Warren County will host a seminar on the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid. Mark Whitmore of Cornell University one of the foremost authorities on the Wooly Adelgid will give a one-and-a-half-hour presentation starting at 10 am at the Cooperative Extension Education Center in Warrensburg.

Following his presentation, he will then conduct a field detection workshop at Pack Forest in Warrensburg from 12:30 pm to 2 pm. During that time, Whitmore will detail what to look for and how to distinguish adelgid damage from other tree issues. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 18, 2017

Some Early Research on Climate Change and Soil

climate changeFor many of us, winter in the Northeast means cold temperatures and piles of snow, drifting through forests and across fields. It’s hard to imagine that winter here could be different, but the prospect of climate change has scientists asking just what our winters might look like in the future – and how those changes might influence forest ecology.

At the U.S. Forest Service’s Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, scientists are thinking about the year 2100. How much warming will occur isn’t certain, but some projections suggest that average air temperatures in our region may increase 5.5 to 9 degrees over the course of this century. The effects are likely to be complex and are difficult to predict, with benefits and costs for different organisms. Some tree species, for example, may benefit from longer and warmer growing seasons, but they may also sustain root damage from more frequent soil freezing. » Continue Reading.



Wait, before you go,

sign up for news updates from the Adirondack Almanack!