Sunday, November 26, 2023

DEC seeks submissions for student poster contest, Jan. 12 deadline

Top Winner - Mudanvit Goyal Mildred E Strang Middle School Yorktown Heights, NY Watershed superhero

DEC and NYWEA are sponsoring the 2023-2024 “Create a Watershed Super Hero” (PDF) Poster Contest for middle school students. Fourteen winners will have the honor of having their artwork in a 2025 calendar distributed across New York State. The deadline for submitting posters is January 12, 2024.

Poster Contest Theme

What you do at home and in your community affects everyone downstream. This poster contest is meant to encourage students to learn about their role in the watershed they live in and how to conserve and protect our water resources, now and for future generations.

All Middle School students (Grades 6-8) in New York State public and private schools are eligible to enter the poster contest. One student per poster. Deadline for receipt of posters is Friday, January 12, 2024. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, November 25, 2023

What comes next for ProcellaCOR?

 

Paradox Lake as seen from Severance Mountain.

Paradox Lake approved for herbicide in battle against invasives

As the Adirondack Park Agency board last week considered allowing the Paradox Lake Association to use a chemical herbicide to fight invasive milfoil, it started to open the door to a broader discussion.

As lake communities around the park see ProcellaCOR EC as a major improvement over other management tools, what is the best way to monitor long term impacts? And how to assist communities with more strategic lake planning?

The relatively new herbicide has been used to effectively kill Eurasian watermilfoil on scores of lakes around the Northeast, including on Minerva Lake in 2020 and Lake Luzerne this summer. APA staff reported a notable increase in permit applications with DEC and suggested a surge in requests could be headed the APA’s way. While trying not to stray too far from the permit on the table, board members raised questions about the broader landscape.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 22, 2023

The Albany 1913 Flood: The Possible Consequences for the Adirondacks (Part I )

Damage of the 1913 floods

By Mike Prescott

It was Easter weekend in March 1913, when without warning upstate New York was struck with a massive storm. The Hudson River rose above all previous recorded levels. The flooding was a result of a huge violent storm system that had developed in the Midwest and lasted for five days.

On Good Friday, March 21, 1913 a strong high-pressure system brought hurricane winds and heavy rain into western New York with gusts of ninety miles an hour in Buffalo. Wind, rain, and sleet downed telephone and telegraph lines across the eastern seaboard. Information about the severity of the storm was unable to be communicated thought the eastern portions of the Nation much less New York State.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 21, 2023

APA develops battery storage application

Battery modules

We have quite a bit of news to share with you out of last week’s Adirondack Park Agency (APA) meeting.

In light of a proposed battery storage system in Raquette Lake and the state’s working group studying battery fires, the APA announced it is creating an application for such infrastructure when it falls under the APA’s jurisdiction. You can read more about that, and the state’s working group update here.

 

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 21, 2023

Glenn and Carol Pearsall Adirondack Foundation 2023 Grants Awarded

Glenn and Carol Pearsall Adirondack Foundation

Johnsburg, NY – The Glenn and Carol Pearsall Adirondack Foundation is a private foundation established in 2000 “dedicated to improving the quality of life for year-round residents of the Adirondack Park.” Since its inception, the foundation has funded more than 600 not-for-profit grant requests totaling over $1.3 million dollars.

The trustees of the Glenn and Carol Pearsall Adirondack Foundation met with representatives from Caroga Lake area not-for-profits in late September, organized by Caroga Arts Collective, to discuss issues in the community. The trustees later convened to review 86 grant applications totaling $612,229. The board is pleased to have fully funded the requested amount for 24 grants and partially funded 10.
The annual underwriting for North Country Public Radio (NCPR) and Mountain Lake PBS and the Junior Trustee grant proposal were also approved, for a total of $106,103 awarded. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 20, 2023

Groups call for forest preserve funding

Potash Mountain in Lake Luzerne.

A widening number of organizations are banding together for funding requests for the Adirondack and Catskill Parks forest preserve. In a letter to Gov. Kathy Hochul, 41 groups called for a $10 million allocation for forest preserve stewardship in the 2024-2025 state budget’s Environmental Protection Fund. Last year’s budget allocated $8 million.

The groups also call for additional investment in affordable housing and cellular and broadband infrastructure. They also hope Hochul will maintain funding for forest preserve visitor centers, support additional research and monitoring programs, develop an accessibility policy for state lands, clear a backlog of conserved land under agreement for public acquisition and add additional staff supporting forest preserve-related state agencies.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, November 17, 2023

Calling all grant writers

 

A small island on Lake Champlain

Lake Champlain Basin Program bolsters grant opportunities

Thanks in part to a surge of federal infrastructure funding in recent years, the Lake Champlain Basin Program is soliciting proposals for a wide range of grant opportunities.

The grants aim to support scientific research, restoration and conservation projects, education and public awareness initiatives and to bolster organizations in the sprawling Lake Champlain watershed.

A round of new grants were announced earlier this month with due dates in late-December and early-January. While application requirements differ from grant to grant, the funding opportunities are largely available to nonprofits, colleges and universities, soil and water conservation districts, and local governments.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 16, 2023

New law protects against invasive species

A person holds invasive Asian clams

Gov. Kathy Hochul signed bipartisan legislation last month that allows town boards to stop the spread of invasive aquatic invertebrate species, such as Zebra mussels and Asian clams, instead of just aquatic invasive plants.

The bill was sponsored by state Sen. Dan Stec, R-Queensbury and state Assemblymember Carrie Woerner, D-Round Lake.

Stec said the law gives communities more flexibility to address invasive species. Woerner said invasive aquatic species harms the environment, health and recreational economy. Both lawmakers were grateful to Hochul for signing the legislation.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 15, 2023

Ausable River Restoration

man in front of construction equipment

The Ausable River Association last month wrapped up the construction phase of work to restore a 3,000-foot-long stretch of the East Branch of the Ausable River in Jay, the nonprofit’s biggest project to date.

The restoration project aims to reinvigorate the river channel in an area where Route 9N follows the river along a gradual bend near the Ice Jam Inn. The river had become “overwidened,” reducing its ability to move sediment and rock through the river system and exacerbating flood and ice jam risks.

By building out a wider stream bank, narrowing the channel and constructing a series of rock structures across the river, AsRA hopes to restore the stream’s natural flow and function, improving trout habitat and easing flood risks. The project faced delays in July and August thanks to rainy weather and high water levels, requiring a one-month extension on AsRA’s work permit.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 15, 2023

Protect the Adirondacks Releases New Report On NYS “30 by 30” Law

In 2022, Governor Kathy Hochul signed the “30 by 30” law that establishes a conservation goal for New York State of protecting 30% of the State’s “lands and inland waters” by the year 2030. This landmark environmental protection legislation enjoyed broad bipartisan support, passing the State Senate by a vote of 58 to 3, and the State Assembly by a vote of 137 to 8. The 30 by 30 law commits New York to do its part to reach a similar national goal established by President Joe Biden in 2021, to protect 30% of the nation’s lands and waters by 2030, and is a major step forward to protect New York’s open spaces, forests, and wetlands, which are cornerstones of the State’s long-term climate resilience and mitigation efforts.

Protect the Adirondacks released a new special report 20% in 2023: An Assessment of the New York State 30 by 30 Act that assessed the level of protected lands and waters in New York State in 2023, the types of lands protected, what constitutes protected lands, and the amount of land that needs to be protected by 2030 to reach the goal of protecting 30% of New York State’s lands and waters as set out in the 30 by 30 Act. The new report also lays out recommendations for needed actions by the State of New York and includes tables for all 62 counties that details the types of lands and total acreages currently protected in each county.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, November 14, 2023

NFCT Online Auction Supports Stewardship and Programming

Northern Forest Canoe Trail logo.


WAITSFIELD, VT
— The Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT) hosts its annual online auction Nov. 15-30 to support stewardship and programming along the 740-mile water trail connecting New York, Vermont, Quebec, New Hampshire and Maine.

Every year, the auction features outdoor gear and experiences donated by NFCT partners and supporters. Highlights include a cedar strip canoe donated by Grant Faller, gift cards from L.L. Bean, gear from NRS and much more.
» Continue Reading.


Monday, November 13, 2023

$3.7 Million Available for Smart Growth Grants for Adirondack and Catskill Park Communities

dec logoGovernor Kathy Hochul announced that $3.7 million in Smart Growth Grants is available for communities and not-for-profit organizations in the Adirondack and Catskill parks. DEC, in partnership with the Department of State and the Adirondack Park Agency, is soliciting applications for projects that will link environmental protection, economic development, and community livability in the Forest Preserve. The focus for this round of Smart Growth Grants is affordable housing, a key component for addressing population and economic stability in these rural areas.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, November 10, 2023

Next APA Board Meeting set for Nov. 16

 

Ray Brook, NY – The Adirondack Park Agency (APA) will hold its monthly meeting on Thursday, November 16, 2023. The meeting will be held at the Agency’s headquarters in Ray Brook, NY. The public is welcome to attend in person or remotely.

Public comment will be available to members of the public who attend the Agency meeting in person as well as those who participate remotely. If you would like the opportunity to make a public comment remotely, please email your name and the phone number used to call into the Board Meeting to AgencyMeeting.PublicComment@apa.ny.gov. Those who sign up for public comment will be limited to three minutes each. Public comment will not be accepted on any agenda items that are before the Board.  » Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 9, 2023

Paul Smith’s College VIC to offer “Hotter Planet, Hotter Politics” Lecture on Nov. 11

Graphic for Nov. 11 climate change presentation at Paul Smith's College VIC.

Paul Smiths, NY – As part of their Fall Lecture Series, Paul Smith’s College VIC will host a presentation called, “Hotter Planet, Hotter Politics,” featuring Bill McKibben and Rev. Lennox Yearwood, Jr. on Saturday, November 11 from 3 to 4 p.m. The lecture series is sponsored by the Adirondack Council and is free to students from Paul Smith’s College and North Country Community College, a donation of $5 from others is requested.

Bill McKibben is founder of Third Act, which organizes people over the age of 60 for action on climate and justice.

His 1989 book The End of Nature is regarded as the first book for a general audience about climate change, and has appeared in 24 languages. He’s gone on to write 20 books, and his work appears regularly in periodicals from the New Yorker to Rolling Stone. He serves as the Schumann Distinguished Scholar in Environmental Studies at Middlebury College, as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he has won the Gandhi Peace Prize as well as honorary degrees from 20 colleges and universities. He was awarded the Right Livelihood Award, sometimes called the alternative Nobel, in the Swedish Parliament. Foreign Policy named him to its inaugural list of the world’s 100 most important global thinkers.

» Continue Reading.



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