Sunday, August 21, 2022

ADK recognized by NYS legislature for centennial, public land leadership

Lake Placid, NY — Earlier this month, New York State Senator Dan Stec presented ADK (Adirondack Mountain Club) with a legislative resolution recognizing ADK’s 100 years of teaching people how to explore and protect New York’s public lands and waters. The resolution acknowledges the many ways in which ADK has achieved this over the last century, including through educational outreach, stewardship programs, and trail work.

The resolution was sponsored by Senator Dan Stec in the Senate, Assembly member Matt Simpson in the Assembly, and co-sponsored by Assembly members Jones, Ashby, Byrne, Salka, Mikulin, DeStefano, Hawley, Manktelow, Cusick, McDonald, Smullen, McMahon, and Walsh. A physical copy was given to ADK Deputy Executive Director Julia Goren during an event at the Adirondack History Museum.

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Saturday, August 20, 2022

Hickory Legacy Foundation to host Bands, Brews and BBQ fundraiser on Aug. 27 in Warrensburg

The Hickory Legacy Foundation will be hosting a fundraising event at the Hickory Ski Center in Warrensburg on August 27th from 3-9, featuring live music, great food and local Adirondack brews and wine. Casual listening with popular hits in the afternoon and welcoming back Soul Sky with Mark Emanatian from 6-9.

We will be serving our standard BBQ fare featuring Oscar’s meats, Adirondack Brewery Micro Brews and Adirondack and Ledge Rock Hill Wines.  The gate is $10 with 12 and under free.

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Thursday, August 18, 2022

Lake George Association to host Aquatic Invasive Species Monitoring event Aug. 19-21

All are encouraged to gain hands-on experience monitoring aquatic invasive species of the Adirondacks during a Lake George Association (LGA)-sponsored Citizen Scientist event this weekend, August 19-21. The event tasks residents with monitoring a specific area of Lake George for a few invasive plants and shellfish.  The monitoring can be done by swim, snorkel, kayak, boat, etc.

Participants will survey a section of shoreline for aquatic invaders, primarily non-native plants as well as mussels, snails, and fish. Citizen scientists can complete the survey of their areas at any time during the three days of the monitoring event. The Lake George Association will offer a training session before the event to help participants navigate their Survey123 reporting app and also assist with species identification while on the water.
LGA staff will be stationed at various areas on the lake on Friday morning from 8 a.m. to noon for participants to report to with data or questions. Aquatic invasive species monitoring in the lake is vital for early detection of new invaders, such as hydrilla, that may pass by the inspection station and boat launch stewards.
For more information or to register, please click here.
To learn more about the Lake George Association, please visit: https://lakegeorgeassociation.org/
Photo at top: Lake George Association website photo.

Thursday, August 18, 2022

ADK Park: Environmental Conservation Police News

Sunbaked Rattlesnake – Warren County
On Aug. 7, ECO Krug responded to Turtle Island in Lake George to remove an unwanted guest from a campsite. Using the appropriate tools, Officer Krug removed a rattlesnake sunning itself near the shoreline. Turtle Island is a popular spot for rattlesnakes from nearby Tongue Mountain. ECOs respond to similar calls to the island several times a year. Based on its painted tail, Officer Krug determined the rattlesnake had been picked up in the past. He turned the snake over to a research assistant working with a professor at Skidmore College studying the local rattlesnake population. The students collect data from the snake and then release it further away from potential human contact.

Officer Krug with rattlesnake. DEC photo.

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Wednesday, August 17, 2022

DEC Announces Completion of New York’s First-Ever Pollinator Distribution Survey

 

New York Natural Heritage Program (NYNHP) recently completed the multi-year Empire State Native Pollinator Survey. The pollinator survey documents the conservation status of 451 species. This included a wide array of native insect pollinators, including four groups of bees, two groups of flies, two groups of beetles, and two groups of moths. This inventory of the state’s native pollinators was recommended in the New York’s Pollinator Protection Plan (PDF).

Some highlights of the survey:

  • NYNHP conducted hundreds of field surveys all over New York and compiled data from museum collections and observations from community/citizen scientists—this totaled over 230,000 insect records!
  • Hundreds of volunteers provided tens of thousands of insect specimens and photographs.
  • The project added 16 bee and fly species to the known pollinators in New York State, but 79 species that were once recorded could not be found.
  • NYNHP determined that 38% of New York’s native pollinators are at risk of extirpation (becoming regionally extinct). In the worst-case scenario, as much as 60% of native insect pollinators may be at risk.

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Monday, August 15, 2022

Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe Denounces EPA’s Flawed Grasse River Cleanup

AKWESASNE — The Saint Regis Mohawk Tribal Council submitted a letter this week to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) expressing its ongoing objection to the remedy for the Grasse River Remediation Project. The Grasse River remediation was completed on October 15, 2021. Addressed to EPA Region 2 Administrator Lisa Garcia, the letter notes the “devastating failure” earlier this year of EPA’s chosen remedy and the reintroduction of hazardous waste into the environment following an ice jam.

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Sunday, August 14, 2022

DEC to Open Wildlife Management Areas from Aug. 16 to 31

dec logoOn Monday, August 8, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced the annual opening to the public of otherwise restricted Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) in Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties from Tuesday, Aug. 16, to Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2022. During the 16-day open house, Upper and Lower Lakes and Wilson Hill WMAs in St. Lawrence County, including the posted refuge or wetland restricted areas, will be open to visitors each day from sunrise to sunset. Perch River WMA in Jefferson County will also be open to visitors with one exception-Perch Lake will be open daily from noon to sunset.

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Thursday, August 11, 2022

Preview of Salt Panel Recommendations

lower st. regis lake

The Adirondack Road Salt Reduction Task Force is nearing completion of its first round of work and a report on its findings and recommendations could be available in the coming month.

During the first Adirondack Lakes Alliance symposium in recent years, Adirondack Watershed Institute Executive Director Dan Kelting previewed the panel’s recommendations. Here’s a look at some of what he said was included in recent drafts:

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Wednesday, August 10, 2022

Adirondack Garden Club announces 2022 Ellen Lea Paine Memorial Nature Fund grant awardees

KEENE— Named for one of the Adirondack Garden Club’s most outstanding members, the Ellen Lea Paine Memorial Nature Fund was established in 2005 to give financial assistance to individuals and not-for-profit organizations involved in programs whose purpose is to study, protect and enjoy the natural environment within the Adirondack Park. Mrs. Paine, who passed away in 2005, was an avid gardener who took great pride in the gardens of her family properties.

This year, the Ellen Lea Paine Memorial Nature Fund awarded eight grants ranging up to $1,500.

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Tuesday, August 9, 2022

Adirondack Water Week celebrates the history of waterways

(Paul Smiths, NY, August 1, 2022) – Adirondack Water Week kicks off on Friday, August 5 and runs through Sunday, August 14 this year. The 3rd annual event celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Clean Water Act, historic legislation that protected our nation’s water resources. Adirondack Water Week is a collaboration involving several organizations and businesses and features more than two dozen programs across the Adirondack region.

The program is coordinated by the Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute and is funded in part by the Lake Champlain Basin Program. One of this year’s highlights is the Adirondack Watershed Challenge, a family event encouraging people to get outside and celebrate time spent on Adirondack waters.

 

“The challenge lets families work through a list of fun activities that they can do in their own town,” said Tom Collins, AWI’s education and outreach program specialist and the Water Week coordinator. “Visit a
local lake or pond, take a picture of wildlife, pick up litter from the shoreline, and eat local ice cream.”

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Tuesday, August 9, 2022

Organizations mark 50th Anniversary of Clean Water Act with new museum exhibit, other events

The Lake Champlain Maritime Museum is marking the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Clean Water Act of 1972 this summer with a new exhibit and public activities. In tandem with partners around the Champlain Valley, the exhibit and activities give the public the chance to celebrate the importance of clean water through history, action, and educational events.

The new exhibit, “The Clean Water Act,” explores the history that led to the passage of the Clean Water Act, key parts to know about this federal legislation, how it relates to Lake Champlain, and people of the Champlain Valley who continue the fight for clean water. Featured locals include Tom Jorling, one of the architects of the Clean Water Act in 1972, former DEC commissioner for New York state, and professor and attorney; Kelley Tucker, executive director of the Ausable River Association; and Iris Hsiang, youth member of the Vermont Climate Council and founder of the Youth Organizing Coalition.

The exhibit was made possible with generous support from the Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership. The Clean Water Act exhibit is open for all to visit for free in-person at the museum in Vergennes, VT or online at www.lcmm.org/Clean-Water-Act.

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Monday, August 8, 2022

ADK Park: Recent Environmental Conservation Police News

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC) Division of Law Enforcement enforces the 71 chapters of New York State’s Environmental Conservation Law (ECL), protecting fish and wildlife and preserving environmental quality across New York. In 1880, the first eight Game Protectors proudly began serving to protect the natural resources and people of New York State.

In 2021, 282 Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs) and Investigators across the state responded to 26,207 calls and worked on cases that resulted in 11,562 tickets or arrests for violations ranging from deer poaching to solid waste dumping, illegal mining, the black market pet trade, and excessive emissions violations.

 

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 2, 2022

Lake George update

putnam

Lake George Park commissioners today got an update on a pair of initiatives that could have a major impact on the future of the lake.

A set of draft regulations to create a new septic inspection program around the lake is awaiting state approval before going up for public comments in the coming weeks. The proposed rules would establish a requirement that thousands of homes near the lake and its tributaries submit to a septic pump and inspection every few years.

Commission officials said they expected to be holding public hearings on the septic rules sometime this fall, possibly in October. The park commission will host a public information session on the program early next month.

Allison Gaddy, a senior planner with the Lake Champlain Lake George Regional Planning Board also updated the park commission on a forthcoming Lake George Watershed Plan. The plan will include an assessment of existing local ordinances, codes and planning documents, as well as an overall review of the condition of the lake, surrounding natural areas and development. It covers a range of issues, including septic issues, land acquisition and conservation, invasive species, climate resiliency, road salt impacts and more.

Focused on water quality, the plan will also outline proposed projects around the lake, providing a source of ideas for future grant applications.

Gaddy said a draft could be available to the public as soon as August or in the next couple of months. The public will have a chance to offer comments on the plan.

Also: the commission’s annual boat steward program has seen a slight uptick in boater contacts compared to the same time last year and has intercepted over 100 instances of invasive species, including two quagga mussels, which have not yet established in Lake George.

I will keep an eye out for more details on all of these topics.

OTHER READS:

Photo: The Clark Hollow Bay property in Putnam as seen from Lake George. Provided by Lake George Land Conservancy

Editor’s note: This first appeared in Zach’s weekly “Water Line” newsletter. Click here to sign up.


Sunday, July 31, 2022

Adirondack Lakes Alliance annual symposium slated for Aug. 5

 

PAUL SMITHS (July 27, 2022) – Registration is now open for the Adirondack Lakes Alliance symposium, which will take place 8:30am – 4:00 pm on Friday, August 5.   

The 7th annual event will be held at Paul Smith’s College and there is a $25 fee to register, which includes lunch.
Attendees will receive an update from Dr. Dan Kelting, executive director of the Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute, on the progress of the Adirondack Road Salt Reduction Task Force. Also featured is Chris Mikolajczyk, the current president of the North American Lake Management Society and senior aquatic ecologist at PrincetonHydro. Chris will present about the benefits to lake associations from developing a comprehensive lake management plan.
There will be a resource fair featuring regional organizations and agencies and a series of small group presentations focusing on three key topics. The first covers aquatic invasive species management tools including herbicide treatment and details about the new NYS Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention Certification Program. The second topic is about on-site wastewater systems on our lake shores, specifically looking at impacts and solutions. The final topic will discuss community education and training resources for lake association members, specifically engaging youth, residents, and other members of the public. All attendees will have the opportunity to attend all three sessions.

Wednesday, July 27, 2022

Stewardship projects enhance access to Franklin, Union Falls ponds

FRANKLIN, NY — The Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT) has completed a series of stewardship projects that improve access to Franklin Falls Pond and Union Falls Pond and mitigate negative environmental impacts to both water bodies.

“These projects are the latest in a long string of work by the NFCT in this area,” said Noah Pollock, NFCT’s stewardship director. “Franklin and Union Falls ponds are two jewels along the Saranac River — they don’t see the same crowds or traffic as other Adirondack lakes, but are equally beautiful. Our crew worked to formalize an access at the northern end of Franklin Falls Pond long used by paddlers to access the lake. It was a steep, eroding bank that led folks to access the water from a variety of different places, which created a lot of impacts on the shoreline vegetation. We built an 8-foot-wide set of timber stairs that are attractive and easy to use, and installed rocks at other informal access points to discourage use.”


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