Thursday, June 9, 2022

Dr. Nicholas Muller lauded for dedicated community service

ESSEX, NY — The Essex Community Fund (ECF) at Adirondack Foundation today announces that Dr. H. Nicholas Muller III will receive the 2022 Francisca Irwin Award for Community Service. The name of the award honors Francisca “Frisky” Paine Irwin, who served as the fund’s first chair and recognizes the precedent she established for extended selfless service to benefit Essex.

Muller, the fourth recipient of the Irwin Community Service Award since it was established in 2019, is recognized for decades of service to his community. As part of the award, he will direct a $1,000 grant from the Essex Community Fund to High Peaks Hospice and Palliative Care. His name will be also added to a plaque that hangs in the Essex Town Office listing previous recipients Donna Sonnett, Sally Johnson and Ron Jackson.

“Dr. Muller, who we all know better as Nick, has been instrumental in the founding and success of ECF over many years,” said Norma Goff, current chair of Essex Community Fund. “He is now retired, and it is a pleasure to see him recognized for all his efforts, and have his name added to the special plaque.”

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Thursday, June 9, 2022

Adirondack Mountain Club receives grant for Phelps Trail project

Keene Valley, NY — ADK (Adirondack Mountain Club) was awarded a $14,750 matching grant from the Environmental Protection Fund’s Park and Trail Partnership Grants program for sustainable trail rehabilitation on the Phelps Trail, one of the eastern approaches for Mt. Marcy. ADK will have to raise $1,807.20 in matching funds, for a total of $16,557.20. 

The grant is one of 27 awards totaling $900,000 for organizations dedicated to the stewardship and promotion of New York’s state parks and historic sites, trails, and public lands.

The grants will be matched with private and local funding and will support projects to strengthen Friends groups and enhance public access and recreational opportunities.

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Wednesday, June 8, 2022

DEC Seeks Public Comment on Plan for Three Lakes Tract Conservation Easement in Herkimer County

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is seeking public comment on a draft recreation management plan (RMP) for the Three Lakes Tract Conservation Easement in the town of Webb, Herkimer County. The 3,350-acre Three Lakes Tract (TLT) is comprised of commercially managed forestland and is named for three waterbodies located on the property-Hitchcock, Grass, and Moose ponds. The RMP will address public recreational access and facilities consistent with the conservation easement.

The public comment period is open until July 1, 2022.

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Tuesday, June 7, 2022

Adirondack Park Fares Well in NYS Legislative Session

adirondack council new logoALBANY, N.Y. – The closing hours of the NYS Legislative Session saw three Adirondack Park Agency appointees confirmed by the Senate, including the first Black appointee, Benita Law-Diao.   The Legislature also approved important policy advances to curb the impacts of climate change, such as the commitment to protect 30% of New York’s forests by 2030.  None of the several proposed amendments to the NYS Constitution’s “forever wild” clause was approved.   
 “Overall, the Legislative Session provided some great victories for Adirondack wilderness, water, jobs and communities,” said Adirondack Council Executive Director William C. Janeway.  “It was great to see new Governor Kathy Hochul reaffirm her support for the Adirondacks and work with Legislative Leaders to achieve it.”  

Monday, June 6, 2022

Saranac Lake: Community events set for Invasive Species Awareness Week, June 6-12

lake flower boat stewards

New York’s Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) is Monday, June 6 through Sunday, June 12, with several community events planned in Saranac Lake.

ISAW is a statewide effort to promote public understanding of invasive species and increase knowledge on the impacts they have on our waterbodies and woodlands. Local events will take place on June 6 and 8 and are co-sponsored by the Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute (AWI) and The Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP).
“Our Adirondack waterways, forests, and farmlands are important for recreation, economic sustainability, and basic ecosystem functions,” said AWI Deputy Director Zoë Smith. “The annual Invasive Species Awareness Week is a chance for people learn about protecting our beloved lakes, rivers and forests from invasive species that threaten our environment and cause irreparable harm.”

Monday, June 6, 2022

New York Invasive Species Awareness Week is June 6 -12

The mission of the New York Invasive Species Awareness Week (NYISAW) is to promote knowledge and understanding of invasive species and the harm they can cause. We want to empower YOU to stop the spread of invasive species!

Organizations across all of New York State are offering a variety of engaging events, such as interpretive hikes, volunteer days, webinars, movie screenings, and fun family activities!

By participating in NYISAW, you can help protect your community’s natural spaces, learn about new invasive species, meet your neighbors, get outdoors, and even win prizes!

Find events near you!

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Monday, June 6, 2022

Uninvited: The Spread of Invasive Species film screening set for June 8

A viewing of the film, Uninvited: The Spread of Invasive Species, will be hosted at the Hotel Saranac on Wednesday, June 8th at 6:30 p.m. The Great Hall Bar will be open and experts will be on hand to introduce the film and discuss local actions.

Co-sponsored by Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute and the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program, and developed by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, the documentary is a professionally produced 60-minute film about the threat invasive species pose to food systems, water, public health, and ecosystems in New York State. See the trailer.

The event is part of New York’s Invasive Species Awareness Week, June 6-12. For more information, visit adkwatershed.org and adkinvasives.com.

Photo at top provided by Zoë Smith, Deputy Director for Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute.

 


Sunday, June 5, 2022

Gov. Hochul announces largest number of new solar projects to date

solar panels

22 large-scale projects will power more than 620,000 New York homes

Governor Kathy Hochul announced awards for 22 large-scale solar and energy storage projects that will deliver enough clean, affordable energy to power over 620,000 New York homes for at least 20 years. As the state’s largest land-based renewable energy procurement to date, these projects will spur over $2.7 billion in private investment and create over 3,000 short- and long-term jobs across the state. The awards accelerate progress to exceed New York’s goal to obtain 70 percent of the state’s electricity from renewable sources by 2030 on the path to a zero-emission grid by 2040 as required by Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act. These awards will strengthen the state’s current pipeline of renewables to power over 66 percent of New York’s electricity from renewable sources.

The 22 large-scale renewable energy projects by region are:

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Friday, June 3, 2022

Trees for a Changing Climate

My ex-wife gave me a shirt that reads “Change is Good. You Go First” when our divorce was finalised, a much-appreciated bit of humour in the midst of a challenging time. It’s hard to find the mirth in some changes, especially when we don’t have a say in them. Climate change is a good example.

Global temperatures are rising at an ever-increasing rate. Extreme weather events are becoming more frequent and severe with time, and no amount of denial will make it go away. We have to learn to roll with this one. We can’t stop climate change tomorrow, but we can “trick” it by updating the kinds of trees we consider for home and community planting. A warmer world affects trees in a myriad ways: Record wet seasons like in 2013, 2017, and 2019 allow normally weak foliar pathogens to spread and flourish, becoming primary agents of mortality.

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Thursday, June 2, 2022

Sun’s out, HABs out?

HABs map

As people enjoyed a long holiday weekend on the water and trails in the Adirondacks, the unofficial start to summer, another season opened for the year: the dreaded harmful algal blooms (HABs).

The Department of Environmental Conservation last week announced the beginning of the reporting season for harmful algal blooms in waters across the state and the Adirondacks. The agency’s map keeps track of HABs reported in the past two weeks as well as the entire season and is the best real-time view of the spread of the potentially-toxic algal blooms across the state.

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Thursday, June 2, 2022

New Visitor Interpretive Center Opens in Lake George Battlefield Park

On Wednesday, May 25, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced the opening of the new Lake George Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) at 75 Fort George Road in Lake George. The new facility will enhance the visitor experience at DEC’s Lake George Battlefield Park and also serve as the new headquarters for the Lake George Park Commission.

“DEC and our partners at the Lake George Battlefield Park Alliance are dedicated to preserving the beauty and history of Lake George through interpretive work and public education,” DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos said. “The VIC will provide park visitors with a welcoming and inclusive space that guides them on a historical journey through artifacts and interpretive displays. Bringing DEC, the Lake George Battlefield Park Alliance, and the Lake George Park Commission under one roof demonstrates the close partnerships working together to improve visitor education, recreation, and conservation in this environmentally unique and historic region of New York.”

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Wednesday, June 1, 2022

Adirondack Council’s Conservationist of the Year Award Goes to Jen Kretser and The Wild Center’s Youth Climate Program

The Adirondack Council will present its Conservationist of the Year Award to climate change educator and activist Jen Kretser and The Wild Center’s Youth Climate Program during the Council’s Forever Wild Day celebration on July 9 at Paul Smith’s College, near Saranac Lake.

“Jen Kretser, the Youth Climate Program and The Wild Center are doing a fantastic job of educating our youth about the dangers of global climate change and what they can do to curb its impacts and prepare for the changes we can no longer prevent,” said Adirondack Council Executive Director William C. Janeway.  “As Director of Climate Initiatives for The Wild Center in Tupper Lake, Jen manages the center’s climate change engagement programs, including the now-famous global Youth Climate Summits and broader Youth Climate Program.”

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Wednesday, June 1, 2022

Great Adirondack Birding Celebration Returns to the VIC June 3-5

The Great Adirondack Birding Celebration will return to the Paul Smith’s College VIC from Friday, June 3-Sunday, June 5. The event will introduce birders of all ages and skill levels to the unique boreal birds and habitats of the Adirondack Park.

Skilled birders will lead full- and half-day field trips to places including Whiteface Mountain, Madawaska Flow and Spring Pond Bog, the second-largest open expanse of peatland in New York. You can even get on the water with a paddling trip led by the Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation (canoe rentals available). Depending where you visit, you might see Bicknell’s Thrush, Boreal Chickadees, hawks, Bald Eagles, and many more species.

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Tuesday, May 31, 2022

Theromoform plastics, what are they and why are we talking about them?

PET plasticThat clear plastic packaging for your berries, salad greens, cosmetics, toys, and clamshell to-go containers, is called thermoform plastic and its name comes from the way that it’s made.

Thermoforming is a molding technique that results in a variety of highly usable plastic products. While thermoforming can apply to a variety of different plastics, we most often come across it in the form of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) which is labeled as #1 plastic. This is the tricky part:

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Monday, May 30, 2022

Help sought to protect Oswegatchie River from invasive water chestnut

water chestnutSt. Lawrence County– Volunteers are needed to assist a removal effort of water chestnut on the Oswegatchie River near the dam, in the Village of Heuvelton.

The removal effort is scheduled for Saturday, June 25th, 2022. Food will be provided by the Village of Heuvelton Fire Department to those who assist the effort. This is a great opportunity for community members to spend some time on the water, and help protect the Oswegatchie River.

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