Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Saranac Lake Honors Olympians in Parade Friday: Updated

The village of Saranac Lake will hold a parade for local Olympians at 4 p.m. this Friday. Nordic-combined skier and medalist Billy Demong of Vermontville, biathletes Lowell Bailey and Haley Johnson of Lake Placid and and Tim Burke of Paul Smiths, ski jumper Peter Frenette of Saranac Lake, lugers Chris Mazdzer of Saranac Lake and Mark Grimmette of Lake Placid, and bobsledder John Napier of Lake Placid will be among honored guests.*

The parade begins at the Post Office on Broadway and winds down Main Street to the Harrietstown Hall, where a ceremony and autograph-signing session will be held. Local kids from Saranac Lake’s schools, Mount Pisgah downhill ski area, Dewey Mountain cross-country ski area and other organizations will also march.

The event had originally been planned for March 13 but was changed to accommodate the schedules of the athletes, whose competition season is not over. The Saranac Lake Women’s Civic Chamber is the primary organizer. The Olympic Regional Development Authority and the Saranac Lake Area Chamber of Commerce are partners. Contact the chamber if you would like more information (518-891-1990).

*Other Olympians may be in attendance—to be updated.

Photograph of the Harrietstown Hall with banners depicting Mazdzer, Demong, Burke and Frenette.


Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Adirondack Family Activities: Saranac Lake Cabin Fever Film Festival

For the ninth year the Cabin Fever Film Festival will be hosting classic films in Saranac Lake each Wednesday in March. Organizer Tim Fortune says,“ We are now located at the John Black Room of the Saranac Lake Laboratory. It is a great venue. This is our third location since we started nine years ago. We started at the Hotel Saranac and had one season at Pendragon Theatre. With the setting of this historic building and showing these old classic movies gives the John Black Room the intimate feeling of a home movie theatre.”

For the first time the Cabin Fever Festival committee has chosen a slightly different format. In past years the Festival consisted of a short film or cartoon and a feature film. This year on Wednesdays, episodes of the 1932 serial Heroes of the West will be shown along with six cartoons and comedy shorts. Each evening will then be a continuation of the “cliffhanger” ending from the previous show of Heroes of the West.

“We are showing all shorts,” says Fortune. “W. C. Fields, Laurel and Hardy, Charlie Chaplin, The Three Stooges, Our Gang, Buster Keaton as well as a classic cartoon each night.”

“We have always been fortunate in the past with local sponsors. Putting on Cabin Fever is very expensive. This year Cape Air has generously sponsored the whole festival with Compass Printing providing the posters and programs.”

Along with Fortune, four other volunteers meet to brainstorm about the Cabin Fever Film Festival schedule and provide multiply duties to pull off the event each year. Fortune credits Bruce Young, Chris Brescia, Danny Ryan and Charles Alexander with making the Festival happen.

“We are all volunteers and any profit goes toward supporting other arts endeavors like the Third Thursday Art Walks that run from June through September,” says Fortune.

Across the street from the Saranac Lake Laboratory, Executive Chef of the Robert Louis Stevenson Tea Room Les Hershhorn, is creating a special weekly buffet for those interested in “Dinner and a Movie.”

Hershhorn states, “There will be a new menu each week. We will feature various international buffets for $25 per person. This week we have a Spanish cuisine with a chicken and sausage paella, salad, vegetable dish, home baked breads and dessert. Last year during the Film Festival we did a Mexican buffet, Indian night and other international flavors. The buffet starts at 5:30 and reservations are required.”

Hershhorn wants everyone to know that children are welcome and to please ask for pricing when making the reservations. He expects more families to come this year because of the “shorts” format of this year’s Cabin Fever Film Festival.

The Robert Louis Stevenson Tea Room, 78 Church Street, and the John Black Room of the Saranac Lake Laboratory are linked in history. The RLS Tea Room was the original home of Dr. Hugh Kinghorn one of the original founders of the RLS Society of America. The Stevenson Society’s goal was to preserve the Baker Cottage (where Stevenson spent time while attempting to recover from TB while in Saranac Lake), original manuscripts and a collection of his artifacts. Across the street the Cabin Fever Film Festival takes place in Dr. Trudeau’s laboratory, now the home to Historic Saranac Lake. Dr. Trudeau was not only a renowned physician but a pioneer in Tuberculosis research and a founding member of the Stevenson Society as well.

General admission is $6.00 per film or $25.00 for all five; Students and seniors are $5.00 or $20.00 for all five while children twelve and under are free. Subscriptions may be purchased up to the first day of the series, March 3. The film starts at 7:00 p.m. each Wednesday in March at the Saranac Lake Laboratory 89 Church Street. For more information call Tim Fortune at 891-1139.


Tuesday, March 2, 2010

"Epic Stories of the Iroquois" at the Adirondack Museum

The Iroquois people are the original residents of what is now New York State. There were five tribes in the first Confederacy: the Mohawk, Seneca, Oneida, Onondaga, and Cayuga. Eventually, a sixth nation, the Tuscarora tribe, joined.

On Sunday, March 14 Mohawk storyteller Darren Bonaparte will recount stories and legends of the Rotinonhsion:ni (Iroquois), including “The Creation Story” and “The Great Peacemaker” at the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake. The program, “Epic Stories of the Iroquois,” is part of the Cabin Fever Sunday series.

Darren Bonaparte is a storyteller, Mohawk historian, artist, teacher, and maker of wampum belts from Akwesasne. He is the author of Creation and Confederation: The Living History of the Iroquois as well as A Lily Among Thorns: The Mohawk Repatriation of Káteri Tekahkwí:tha.

Bonaparte is a also former elected chief of the Mohawk Council of Akwesasne. His articles have been published in Aboriginal Voices, Winds of Change, The Nation, and Native American magazine. He is also the creator of “The Wampum Chronicles: Mohawk Territory on the Internet” at www.wampumchronicles.com.

The presentation will be held in the Auditorium, and will begin promptly at 1:30 p.m. Cabin Fever Sunday programs are offered at no charge to museum members. The fee for non-members is $5.00. There is no charge for children of elementary school age or younger. Refreshments will be served. For additional information, please call the Education Department at (518) 352-7311, ext. 128 or visit the museum’s web site at
www.adirondackmuseum.org .

Also on March 14, the Adirondack Museum Education Department will hold an Open House for Educators from 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. Area teachers are invited to visit the Mark W. Potter Education Center to discover the variety of hands-on programs available for students in Pre-K through grade 12. All are designed to meet curricular needs. Educators can learn about the museum’s School Membership program and enter to win a day of free outreach classes for their school. For more information, contact Christine Campeau at (518) 352-7311, ext. 116 or ccampeau@adkmuseum.org.

Photo: Darren Bonaparte with wampum.


Sunday, February 28, 2010

Adirondack Day at the Wild Center, Tupper Lake

Ten years after the Adirondack Curriculum Project (ACP) began, hundreds of teachers and students have been touched by their work and better understand the unique landscape of their home, the Adirondacks. They will share their knowledge with each other during Adirondack Day on March 4th at The Wild Center in Tupper Lake.

Approximately 140 students and teachers from six schools will share their projects through storytelling, a puppet show, a game show, interactive displays and presentations, on Adirondack topics from biodiversity and trout to nocturnal animals and history. Schools attending include – Tupper Lake, Potsdam, Indian Lake, Newcomb, Lake Placid, and Ausable Valley.

Often times in the Adirondacks, because of time and distance, small schools don’t have the opportunity to interact. Adirondack Day provides the opportunity for these students to meet and ‘teach’ each other. Certainly by the end of the day, there will be over 100 young people more knowledgeable about the uniqueness of their home.

Sandy Bureau, science teacher at Indian Lake Central School and one of the day’s organizers says, “Research shows that having to ‘teach’ others is one of the best ways to learn. We hope to provide that opportunity and to help students feel the value of their voices and learning about this special place we live in.”

The ACP’s mission is to foster better public understanding, appreciation and stewardship of the Adirondack region’s natural and cultural resources, by providing educational resources and training opportunities for teachers in the region. The ACP hosts workshops for teachers showing them how to develop an ‘Adirondack Challenge’ – a student-centered, project-based, lesson plan aligned with NYS Learning Standards.

Teachers leave the workshops with a project ready to use in their own classrooms. They later submit their completed projects to the ACP, where other teachers can access and utilize those resources. Adirondack Day is the first opportunity for students who participated in those projects to share their experiences.

For additional information on the Adirondack Curriculum Project, visit www.adkcurriculumproject.org.

Adirondack Day has been funded by The Glenn and Carol Pearsall Adirondack Foundation, which is dedicated to improving the quality of life for year-round residents of the Adirondack Park.


Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Fiddling and Storytelling at Saranac Lake

Join storyteller Bill Smith and master fiddler Don Woodcock for a winter afternoon of stories about growing up in the North Country and lively toe-tapping music. The Adirondack Museum’s popular Cabin Fever Sunday series will return to Saranac Lake for a special program on February 28, 2010. “Rosin and Rhyme” with Bill Smith and Donny Woodcock will be held at Saranac Village at Will Rogers. The time will be 2:00 p.m.

The presentation will offered at no charge to museum members and residents of Saranac Village. The fee for non-members is $5.00. There is no charge for children of elementary school age or younger. For additional information, please call the Education Department at (518) 352-7311, ext. 128 or visit the museum’s web site at www.adirondackmuseum.org.

Master Adirondack storyteller and folksinger Bill Smith is the genuine article. He learned about the adventures of the North Country’s old woodsmen from his father. He learned the popular ballads and songs of an earlier time from his mother. To that strong foundation he has added his own years of living as a logger, trapper, hunter, fisherman, and guide.

Prepare to laugh ’til you can’t stand up at Bill’s tall tales, step back in time with his descriptions of country life in the “old days,” and feel warm and nostalgic as he picks up his autoharp for a Carter family tune.

Don Woodcock began to play the fiddle at the age of fourteen. More than forty years later, he holds the title of Grand Champion Fiddler of New York State. Woodcock’s playing is technically superb and he is recognized for having one of the largest repertoires of traditional fiddle tunes around.

Photo: Don Woodcock and Bill Smith; courtesy of Old Songs Festival press images.


Sunday, February 21, 2010

Wild Center’s Winter Wild Days: Wind Power, Animal Tracking

The Wild Center’s Winter Wildays continues on Saturday, February 27th, 2010. With activities from now until the end of March there is a schedule guaranteed to keep everyone in the family entertained, enlightened and warm during these long winter months.

On Saturday February 27th, at 1:00 pm, join Ken Visser, as he provides an introduction to small wind turbine technology and takes a closer look at the fundamentals of wind, current technology and ongoing research in ‘Windpower in the Adirondacks’.

The aerodynamic design of a wind turbine is a complex process involving the balance of numerous parameters, but the fundamental objective of a wind turbine design is to maximize energy produced while minimizing the capital and operating costs. How to balance these objectives and produce a viable design has led to many “marketing ploys” that the consumer needs to be aware of.

Three areas of interest will be presented: 1) fundamentals of wind energy including power and energy in the wind, factors affecting turbine performance and behavior, and various turbine concepts, 2) current technologies for the consumer, such as what is available and what to look out for and be aware of; costs; and expectations, and 3) wind research at Clarkson University on new concepts for the future.

On Sunday, February 28th, Family Art and Nature day begins at 1pm. Bring the entire family and explore this week’s theme, ‘Become a Track Detective’. Come prepared to go outside and use your detective skills to track down some of our critter friends. Once you’ve learned the ropes we’ll head inside to create our own track stamps and then create your own track story. Snowshoes provided.

As always, there are hikes on free snowshoes, animal encounters, movies and food. Winter Wildays are free for members or with paid admission.

For additional information on The Wild Center, visit www.wildcenter.org or call (518) 359-7800.


Thursday, February 18, 2010

Adirondack Music Scene:Great Vocalists, Big Band, Jazz and Classical

Were I to be in the area this week, I wouldn’t miss Annie and the Hedonists at the Adirondack Mountain Club’s High Peaks Information Center on Saturday. This downstate bluesy folk band makes fantastic song choices and has a fabulous vocalist.

Another performance I would do my best to make is in North Creek, where wonderful vocalist is Maddy Walsh playing with Mike Suave at barVino, where I hear the food and ambiance alone are worth the trip. Here’s what we have to look forward to in the week ahead:

Thursday, February 18th:

In Canton, Open Mic at The Blackbird Cafe. This is a continuing talent contest and it starts at 7 pm.

Friday, February 19th:

In Potsdam, “An Evening with Elvis” with impersonator Joe Angerosa. The performance will be held at The Old Snell Auditorium starting at 6 pm with a $5 cover.

In Jay, JEMS Coffee House Series features Jazz Saxaphonist, Jonathan Lorentz. The performance is from 7 – 9 pm at The Amos and Julia Ward Theatre.

In Potsdam, The Count Basie Orchestra will perform from 7:30 – 9:30 pm. They will be at the Helen Hosmer Concert Hall at SUNY Potsdam.

Saturday, February 20th:

In Lake Placid, Annie and the Hedonists will be performing at 8 pm. They will be at The Adirondack Mountain Club’s High Peaks Information Center. They are a very good band.

In Ausable Forks, Capital Zen plays at 20 Main. Show starts at 9 pm.

In North Creek, Fingerdiddle performs at Laura’s Tavern starting at 9 pm. I know nothing about these folks except that they must have been liked because they’ve been asked back to the same venue within the same month. That’s a good sign.

In Lake Placid, Raisonhead is at Zig Zags starting at 9 pm.

Sunday, February 21st:

In Potsdam, The Metropolitan Opera: Live in HD Encore of “Der Rosenkavalier” . This held at the Roxy Theater from 1-5:30 pm.

In North Creek,Suave and Maddy play barVino. They’re on from 5 – 7 pm.

Wednesday, February 24th:

In Canton, The Manhattan Piano Trio will play at St. Lawrence University from 7 pm. Free admission at The Underground.

Photo: Annie and Jonny of Annie and the Hedonists.


Sunday, February 14, 2010

Wilmington Historical Society Events For 2010

Wilmington Historical Society has announced it’s meeting dates and programs for the remainder of 2010. Regular meetings are held at 7 pm at the Wilmington Community Center. Open discussion on local historical topics are held from 7 pm-8pm prior to the regular business meeting. Refreshments are served and the public is invited to attend. For further information, contact Karen Peters or Merri Peck at 518-420-8370. Here is the full calendar of open discussion events:

Wednesday, March 3— “Airplanes & Helicopters in Wilmington”

Wednesday, April 7— “The AuSable River & the Owaissa Club”

Wednesday, May 5— “Wilmington Memorials”

Wednesday, June 2— “Races Up Whiteface Mountain”

Wednesday, July 7— “Wilmington & Area Fur Farming”

Wednesday, August 4— “Wilmington Notch”

Wednesday, September 1— “Wilmington Taxes!”

Wednesday, October 6— “Disasters in Wilmington”

Wednesday, November 3— “All Kinds of Snow & Ice in Wilmington”

Note: There is NO Meeting in December.


Sunday, February 7, 2010

Lake Placid to Celebrate 1980 Games With Events

If you can’t make to the Olympic Games in Vancouver, Lake Placid will be hosting a 30th anniversary celebration of the 1980 XIII Olympic Winter Games February 12th to 28th. The event will feature a competition in which families will go head to head in alpine skiing/snowboarding, biathlon target shooting, bobsled, curling, hockey skills, and speedskating. The inaugural Gold Medal Games Family Edition will also feature a torch run, opening ceremonies, and medals and awards. Sporting events will be held in the same venues that were used during the 1980 winter games when the U.S. hockey team stunned the world winning by beating the Soviet Union and Eric Heiden won five Olympic speedskating gold medals.

“That was an incredible moment in history, not only for Lake Placid, but for the entire country,” noted Olympic Regional Development Authority (ORDA) president/CEO Ted Blazer. “Those Games will forever be remembered for overcoming the impossible, whether, it’s a small Upstate New York village hosting the world’s largest sporting event, or the U.S. hockey team defeating the heavily favored former-Soviet Union on their way to gold. And who can forget what Eric accomplished in speedskating or what Phil Mahre did in the alpine events. Moments and memories like these only come around once in a lifetime.”

Here is more from the press release announcing the events:

The 1980 torch will be re-lit on Saturday, Feb. 13. On Sunday, Feb. 14, visitors can embrace the greatest moment in American sports history with an opportunity to watch Disney’s “Miracle” in the 1980 Olympic arena, the same arena where the U.S. Olympic hockey team stunned the former-Soviet Union before beating Finland on their way to the gold medal. The movie, starring Kurt Russell as the legendary U.S. team coach Herb Brooks, begins at 8:30 p.m., preceded by the debut of “Small Town, Big Dreams,” at 7 p.m. Other Olympic themed movies will be shown throughout the two-week celebration in the Olympic Museum.

Additional activities will include a viewing of the NHL’s Stanley Cup, also in the Olympic Museum, Sunday, Feb. 14, toboggan races, fireworks and family style celebrations on Mirror Lake.

For more information on the 30th Anniversary of the Lake Placid Olympic Winter Games, visit www.whitefacelakeplacid.com/family.


Thursday, February 4, 2010

Adirondack Music Scene:Winter Carnival, Jam Bands and Orchestras

The first of two very exciting weeks of music starts this Friday in Saranac Lake where Winter Carnival is going to be on in full glory. There will be bands and concerts in town every day or night for the whole two weeks, awe-inspiring!

Other events to check out include a new Open Mic and Hoot, a variety of classical music concerts and local folk musicians.

Thursday, February 4th:

In Canton, there is an Open Mic at the Blackbird Cafe. Sign up is at 6:30, performances start at 7 pm. Writers,readers and musicians of all kinds are encouraged. the winners will be selected for a CD to be released later this year.

Friday, February 5th:

In Wilmington, Eat, Sleep, Funk is playing at Steinhoff’s.

In Ausable Forks, Lucid is at 20 Main.

In Saranac Lake, the Friday Night Dewey Ski Jam is held from 6:30 – 9:30 pm. This Friday Russ Cook and Bard Hurlburt are the musical guests and Nori’s Village Market provides the food. Donations are welcomed.

In Saranac Lake, The Waterhole presents their first in a long series of free Winter Carnival shows. Mecca Bodega kicks it off at 10 pm. These guys are preceeded by a 9 pm cocktail hour.

In Saranac Lake, Roadkill Dog is at Captain Cook’s from 9 pm – 2 am.

In Canton, A first friday Music Jam is being held from 7 – 8:30 pm at the TAUNY Gallery.

Also in Canton, a Hootenanny will be held from 7 – 11:00 pm at the Blackbird Cafe. A variety of local musicians will be passing the hat.

Saturday, February 6th:

In Saranac Lake , the second night of free Winter Carnival shows at The Waterhole gives us the Rev Tor band. Again this band is preceeded by a 9 pm cocktail hour and gets going around 10 pm.

Also in Saranac Lake, Reflections starts at 8 pm at Captain Cook’s.

In St. Regis Falls, Roy Hurd will be performing at 1 pm. It’s going to be held at The St. Regis Falls Fire Station as part of a Winter Fest celebration.

In Potsdam, The Met Live in HD. At the Roxy Theater “Simon Boccanegra” will be feeding from 1 – 4:30 pm

In Elizabethtown, Piano By Nature recital is happening between 7 – 8:30 pm at The Hand House. Soloist Jill Dawe will play works by Chopin, Debussy Ginestera and Part. Reservations are strongly encouraged.

In Tupper Lake at The Wild Center, “Pleasures of the Courts” dinner and dance will be held from 7:30 – 9 pm. The Orchestra of Northern New York will be giving their annual Baroque concert. Tickets are available at the box office.

In Plattsburgh at the Monopole , Capital Zen starting at 9 pm.

Sunday, February 7th:

In Glens Falls, the Lake George Chamber Orchestra will give a concert at The Hyde Collection Art Museum. The concert is form 2 – 4 pm. Call for reservations.

In Elizabethtown, Piano By Nature recital will be held at The Hand House from 3 – 4:30 pm. Soloist Jill Dawe will play works by Chopin, Debussy Ginestera and Part. Reservations are strongly encouraged.

In Potsdam, “Pleasures of the Courts” dinner and dance will be held from 3 – 5 pm. The Orchestra of Northern New York will be giving their annual Baroque concert. It will be held at St. Mary’s Church.

In Saranac Lake, Jamie Notarthomas plays at 3 pm at The Waterhole.

In Saranac Lake, Sarah Bargman will be performing at Will Rogers from 7:30 – 8:30 pm.

Monday, February 8th:

In Saranac lake, Sven Curth gives a free performance at The Waterhole. The show starts around 9 pm.

Tuesday, February 9th:

In Saranac Lake, Joey Driscoll plays a free show at The Waterhole. He starts at 8 pm.

Wednesday, February 10th:

In North Creek, Vinnie Leddick is at barVino. He’s playing from 7 – 9 pm.

In Saranac Lake, E.O.E. live at The Waterhole. Mardi Gras celebration! This band is from New Orleans. Show starts at 10 pm.

Photo: Mecca Bodega


Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Adirondack Family Activities: Good Curling

Curling is a game rooted in history. The name refers to the rotation the game piece or “stone” takes as it spirals along the ice. The “rock” will curve (curl) depending on the direction the rock spins.

Traced back to 16th century Scotland, the game called Curling was brought to North American 200 years later by Scottish soldiers. It is commonly referred to as “chess on ice” due to the subtle finesse and strategy required of its players.

According to Historic Saranac Lake curling got an early start in the Tri-Lakes when the Pontiac Bay and Pines Curling Clubs was formed around 1897. These two clubs later combined to form the Saranac Lake Curling Club.

During its heyday the Saranac Lake Curling Club held numerous competitions on the national and international level. Curling made its first Olympic appearance in Chamonix and was a demonstration sport during the 1932, 1936, 1964, 1988 and 1992 Olympics. It wasn’t until the 1998 Nagano games that curling became an official Olympic sport.

In 1943, due to wartime economic reasons curling waned in popularity and the Saranac Lake Curling Club closed. It wasn’t until Ed and Barbara Brandt came to Lake Placid in 1981 and started the Lake Placid Curling Club that the Adirondack tradition was resurrected. Over twenty-five years later, the Lake Placid Curling Club is going strong and continues to grow and promote the sport.

On Saturday, February 6, the Lake Placid Curling Club will present a demonstration during the Saranac Lake Winter Carnival on Lake Flower, near the original site of the 18th century Pontiac Curling Club. A bagpiper will escort the players from the Saranac Lake Free Library to the state boat launch on Lake Flower. Game play is at 11:00 a.m.

According to Amber McKernan, membership secretary for the Lake Placid Curling Club (LPCC) the sport is not only competitive but also social. “We travel to other curling clubs and are always interested in new members. We had a very successful Learn to Curl event in the fall. We recently welcomed two young members, both teenagers, to the club,” she says. The LPCC curls on Sunday evenings at the USA Rink of the Olympic Center.

For those not in the know: skip is not a person’s name, but the captain of the team. The skip is the only team member allowed in the house (the circular scoring area with a bull’s eye center) so he/she can direct the stone’s delivery. One doesn’t throw the stone but deliveries it to the house. A team is known as a rink and consists of four players: lead, second, vice-skip, and skip. A game usually consists of eight ends (similar to an inning in baseball.) The end is completed when all the stones have been delivered to one end. A competitor curls the stone by causing the stone to curve strategically toward the scoring area and gets the closest to the center of the circle. Only one team (rink) can score per end. One point is awarded for each stone closer to the center than the opponent’s.

What was traditionally a smooth rock is now a polished circular-shaped granite “stone” that meets the requirements of the World Curling Federation. Weighing in at 42 pounds, each stone’s path is steered by players sweeping a path in front, reducing the friction and increasing the stone’s peed.

Similar to golf, another Scottish game, curling has as many rules on etiquette as it does on play. For example each bonspiel (tournament) starts and ends with a handshake wishing the opposing team “good curling.”

So whether you choose to watch curling from the comfort of your own home, at the Vancouver Olympics or watch a demonstration of a local club, enjoy a sport formed of good sportsmanship, skill and tradition.

photo of the Lake Placid Curling Club on Lake Flower used with permission of www.adkfamilytime.com


Tuesday, February 2, 2010

2010 Lake Placid Ironman Seeks Volunteers

The 2010 Lake Placid Ironman Triathlon is seeking volunteers for the July 25, 2010 race. About 2,000 athletes and nearly 4,000 volunteers take part in what organizers say is Placid’s largest one-day annual event, generating “a direct economic impact of about $8 million for Essex County.” “In addition to the days surrounding the actual race,” a recent press release extolled, “a large number of the participants make multiple pre-race visits in preparation for the event, greatly enhancing the overall revenue generated.” Kathy Pfohl, volunteer director, says that two-thirds of the volunteers are from outside the region.

There is a tiered management system in place in order to organize the large numbers of volunteers. As volunteer director, Pfohl is responsible for overseeing the entire volunteer effort (as part of her job at the Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism or ROOST). There are approximately 80 captains who manage their respective “team” of volunteers, which can number from one to 200 individuals. Each captain is responsible for the coordination of the schedules, locations and communication with their team of volunteers, to ensure that they are in their places on race day.

For 2010, there are several captain positions open. “Captains enjoy a number of perks, including the opportunity to earn a monetary donation of $750 for their qualifying group from the Community Fund,” according to the press release.

Those interested in a captain’s position and/or the Community Fund should contact Kathy Pfohl at kpfohl@lakeplacid.com or at the ROOST office at 523.2445 x110. Online registration for all volunteer positions is located at www.ironmanlakeplacid.com.


Sunday, January 31, 2010

IRS Volunteers Offer Free Tax Return Preparation Program

The Internal Revenue Service’s Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA) offers free tax help to families and individuals whose household income is below $50,000. Trained community volunteers can help with determining your eligibility for special credits like the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit. In addition to free tax return preparation assistance, the program also offers free electronic filing (e-filing).

Those who take part in the e-filing program will receive their refunds in half the time it would take through traditional paper filing.

For more information or to make an appointment contact Warren County Head Start at 793-3624.


Thursday, January 28, 2010

Adirondack Music Scene:Amateurs, Soloists and Large Ensemble Concerts

We have an eclectic bunch of music events to choose from this week. Everything from amateur jams to serious solo and ensemble performances.

I’m personally going with the open minded mic tonight and the last of the January Jams on Sunday because I know how awesome that many talented people in one place can be. Also I’ve been checking out Peter Griggs online and I think his music is beautiful as well as educational.

Thursday, January 28th:

In Saranac Lake, Open Minded Mic Night at BluSeed Studios! The best open mic for audiences and performers in the north country. Sign up is at 7 pm and the show gets underway at 7:30 pm. Wonderful blues guitarist and singer Steve Langdon is hosting. There is a $3 cover. Stay until the end and vote for the best in show.

Friday, January 29th:

In Jay, Peter Griggs will be performing many different guitar styles including bossa nova, nuevo flamenco and blues guitar. This is a JEMS production to be held at the Amos and Julia Ward Theatre. The concert starts at 7 pm.

In Warrensburg, Dreaded Wheat is performing at George Henry’s. They play from 9:30 pm to midnight.

Saturday, January 30th:

In Plattsburgh, the Adirondack Wind Ensemble will perform at 2 pm. It will be held at the E. Glenn Giltz Auditorium in Hawkins Hall at SUNY. General admission is $10 and students get in for free.

In Long Lake, The Long Lake Razz ( LLCS Jazz Band) and The Garrison/Leblanc Trio will be performing for the annual Chocolate Fest benefiting the library. The benefit concert will be held at the Long Lake Town Hall from 6:30 to 9:30 pm.

In Wilmington, Is is the band and Steinhoff’s is the place. Unfortunately their website is under construction but I hear they are a talented 3 piece jazz band. There is no cover and they start around 10 pm.

In Saranac Lake a Scottish Musical Evening will be held at Will Rogers by the St. Andrews Society of the Adirondacks. The event starts at 6:30 pm and costs $5. Call 891-2165 for more information.

In Warrensburg, James Hood is at George Henry’s. He plays from 8 – 11 pm.

Sunday, January 31st:

In Lake Placid, the Adirondack Wind Ensemble will perform at 1:30pm at LPCA. Tickets are $10 , students can attend for free.

In Upper Jay, the last of the January Jams at The Recovery Lounge. A fun experience for families as well as musicians. It starts at 2 pm and runs until 6 pm.

In Keene Valley, Peter Griggs will be performing “500 Years of Music for Guitar”. This event is put on by the East Branch Friends of the Arts at the Keene Valley Congregational Church and starts at 4 pm.

Photo: Peter Griggs


Saturday, January 23, 2010

4-H Adirondack Guide Program Announced

The 4-H Adirondack Guide Program is a unique program designed for boys and girls 12 to 18 years old who are interested in in-depth exploration of natural resources, gaining knowledge in the biological sciences, and developing outdoor recreation teaching and leadership skills.

4-H Adirondack Guide Program activities include field trips and classes, canoe and hiking trips, and community service projects. Participants learns such skills as map and compass reading; canoeing; tree, plant, flower and wildlife identification; environmental teaching techniques; woods lore and safety; first aid and lifeguard training; outdoor clothing and equipment; wilderness trip coordination, and the use of global positioning systems (GPS). Participants have the opportunity to work with licensed Adirondack Guides, Forest Rangers, Fish and Wildlife Biologists, Foresters and skilled woodsmen. The program is conducted in an informal atmosphere, conducive to building confidence and self-esteem.

The program, sponsored by Cornell University Cooperative Extension, allows participants to advance from the Apprentice Guide level, through Intermediate, to full Senior 4-H Adirondack Guide status.

An orientation meeting for the 4-H Adirondack Guide Program will be held Thursday, February 18, 2010 7:00 p.m. at the Cornell Cooperative Extension Education Center, 377 Schroon River Road in Warrensburg, NY.

For more information, or to register, please call the Cornell Cooperative Extension office at 623-3291 or 668-4881 to register. For further information, ask to speak with John Bowe.

Photo: 4-H Adirondack Guide program participants Ben Hoffman and Sabrina Fish starting a fire.