Sunday, June 27, 2010

Adirondack Museum Calls For Quilts

Do you have an exceptional bed quilt or pieced wall hanging that was made in, inspired by, or depicts the Adirondack region?

The Adirondack Museum at Blue Mountain Lake is seeking quilts for “The Second Annual Great Adirondack Quilt Show” to be held from September 14 to October 17, 2010. The show will be part of the museum’s Fabric and Fiber Arts Festival and will complement the exhibit “Common Threads: 150 Years of Adirondack Quilts and Comforters.”

There will be two divisions in the show. Historic quilts (those made before 1970) can be of any theme or technique, but must have been made in the Adirondacks. Modern quilts (those made after 1970) should have a visible connection to the Adirondack region.

An eligible quilt might depict an Adirondack scene in appliqué or be composed of pieced blocks chosen because the pattern is reminiscent of the region – “Pine Tree,” Wild Goose Chase,” or “North Star,” for example.

A “People’s Choice” award will be presented to one quilt in each division.

Although the show will not be juried, applicants must complete a registration form prior to September 11, 2010. A statement by the maker is required to complete the application process. For additional information or to receive an application, please contact Hallie Bond via email at hebond@adkmuseum.org , by telephone at (518) 352-7311, ext. 105, or through the postal service at P.O. Box 99, Blue Mountain Lake, NY, 12812.

Photo: Winner of the “Best in Show” award at the quilt show held as part of the Adirondack Museum’s Fabric and Fiber Arts Festival on September 19, 2009. The quilt is “Poppies” and was made by Betty deHaas Walp of Johnsburg, New York, in 2006.


Saturday, June 26, 2010

Venison and Potato Chips: Native Foodways Lecture

During the nineteenth century, a number of Adirondack Indians marketed their skill as hunters, guides, basket makers, doctors, and cooks.

On Monday, July 5, 2010 Dr. Marge Bruchac will offer a program entitled “Venison and Potato Chips: Native Foodways in the Adirondacks” at the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake. Bruchac will focus attention on what might be a lesser-known Native skill – cooking.

The first offering of the season for the museum’s Monday Evening Lecture series, the presentation will be held in the Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. There is no charge for museum members. Admission is $5.00 for non-members.

Nineteenth century white tourists paid good money to purchase wild game from Native people, to hunt in their territories, to buy medicines and remedies, and to eat in restaurants or lodgings where Indians held sway in the kitchen.

Dr. Bruchac will highlight stories of individuals such as Pete Francis, notorious for hunting wild game and creating French cuisine; George Speck and Katie Wicks, both cooks at Moon’s Lake House and co-inventors of the potato chip; and Emma Camp Mead, proprietress of the Adirondack House, Indian Lake, N.Y., known for setting an exceptionally fine table.

Bruchac contends that these people, and others like them, actively purveyed and shaped the appetite for uniquely American foods steeped in Indigenous foodways.

The Adirondack Museum celebrates food, drink, and the pleasures of eating in the Adirondack Park this year with a new exhibition, “Let’s Eat! Adirondack Food Traditions.” The exhibit includes a 1915 photograph of Emma Mead as well as her hand-written recipes for “Green Tomato Pickles” and “Cranberry Puffs.”

Marge Bruchac, PhD, is a preeminent Abenaki historian. A scholar, performer, and historical consultant on the Abenaki and other Northeastern native peoples, Bruchac lectures and performs widely for schools, museums, and historical societies. Her 2006 book for children about the French and Indian War, Malian’s Song, was selected as an Editor’s Choice by The New York Times and was the winner of the American Folklore Society’s Aesop Award.

Photo: Dr. Marge Bruchac


Friday, June 25, 2010

Northern Forest Canoe Trail Event Has 740-Mile Goal

The Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT) is celebrating its 10th Anniversary in 2010, and is hosting an international paddling challenge as part of its anniversary festivities.

On Saturday, July 24, kayakers and canoeists paddling on any waterway of the 740-mile trail can contribute to “740 Miles in One Day,” with the goal to paddle the total mileage of the trail between sunrise and 5:00 p.m. on that day. Pre-registration for the free event is open at the event website.

“This event is a great excuse for families or a group of friends to get out on a lake, river or pond along the Trail and be a part of our fun anniversary celebration weekend,” said NFCT Executive Director Kate Williams.

Jen Lamphere running the Saranac by Mike PrescottMiles will be counted per person, not per boat, so you don’t have to be a serious paddler to have a big impact. A canoe with three people making a 5-mile trip will translate to 15 miles toward the goal. Participating paddlers will report their mileage to the designated email address 740@northernforestcanoetrail.org or by calling or texting 802-279-8302. Photos and videos of paddler’s experiences can be uploaded on the event website.

Visit northernforestcanoetrail.org/ to see the 13 mapped sections of the water trail in New York, Vermont, southern Québec, New Hampshire and Maine. Choose a portion of the trail close to home or take a road trip to a far off destination. People paddling from Vermont into Canada or from Canada into Vermont should have a passport to show at border patrol stations.

The “740 Miles in One Day” event is part of NFCT’s 10th Anniversary Paddler’s Rendezvous taking place July 24-25 in Rangeley, Maine. There will be a hosted paddle station set up on Haley Pond in Rangeley from noon to 4:00 p.m. on the 24th to give anniversary celebrants an easy way to contribute to the 740-mile goal.

The total miles paddled will be announced during a Saturday evening anniversary party and dinner at Saddleback Maine resort.


Thursday, June 24, 2010

Lake Placid Celebrates Olympic Day Saturday

The Lake Placid Olympic Training Center and the Olympic Regional Development Authority (ORDA) will be hosting Olympic Day, on Saturday, June 26, from 1-3 p.m. at the Olympic Training Center.

The free event gives families and youngsters the chance to try Olympic sports such as bobsled and biathlon. Participants can even try luge on the fully refrigerated start ramps inside USA Luge’s headquarters. Visitors can also watch freestyle athletes train on trampolines and there will be autograph sessions with luge, bobsled, skeleton, biathlon, ski jumping and freestyle athletes.

Guests will also be given the chance to win great raffle prizes including dinner with an Olympian at the Olympic Training Center and enjoy great games and ice cream. There will also be live music performed by U.S. biathlete and two-time Olympian Lowell Bailey.

Those who participate in Olympic Day will also receive ORDA coupons good for 50% off a Lake Placid bobsled ride, 50% off admission to the Olympic Jumping Complex and 50% off the Be a Biathlete.

During last February’s Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, Canada, 12 area athletes competed for the United States. Lake Placid’s Mark Grimmette, a five-time Olympian in doubles’ luge, was the team’s flag bearer during the Opening Ceremonies, while Andrew Weibrecht, also of Lake Placid, won a bronze medal in the men’s Super-G. Vermontville’s Bill Demong claimed silver in the Nordic combined team event and gold in the large hill Nordic combined event. Overall, the U.S. Olympic squad celebrated its best Olympics ever, claiming the overall medal count with 37.

Olympic Day is an international event celebrating and promoting the participation in sport by men, women and children from all walks of life in all corners of the world. It is a worldwide commemoration of Baron Pierre de Coubertin’s June 23, 1894, convening the first International Olympic Committee (IOC) meeting at the Sorbonne in Paris, and the founding of the Modern Olympic Games. National Olympic Committees (NOCs) throughout the world will also participate in the international celebration, with each Olympic Committee sending Olympic Day greetings to participating nations and to further the Olympic spirit and movement.

For more information about Olympic Day, visit teamusa.org, or whitefacelakeplacid.com.


Thursday, June 24, 2010

Ausable and Boquet River Associations Hosting Native Plant Sales

The Ausable and Boquet River Associations (AsRA and BRASS) will host native plant sales offering gardeners a selection of plants native to northern NY and the Adirondacks. A Master Gardener will also be present to offer gardening advice.

BRASS will host a sale tomorrow, on Friday, June 25 from 9-1pm at the Elizabethtown Farmer’s Market located on Hand Avenue. AsRA will host a sale this Sunday, June 27 from 9-2pm at the Keene Valley Farmer’s Market located at Marcy Field. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 23, 2010

Farmers Market Returns to Adirondack Wild Center

The Wild Center welcomes local farmers and crafters back for a weekly seasonal market, beginning Thursday, June 24th from 11-3 pm. Over a dozen vendors from the Adirondacks and the Champlain and St. Lawrence valleys will return to the summer pavilion tent at the museum. Meats and vegetables, baked goods and herbs, hand-made crafts, honey and maple syrup will be available for sale by the producers who grew or made them. Vendors may include Sunwarm Gardens, South Meadow Farm Maple Sugarworks, Underwood Farms, The Cupcake Market, Lake Flour Bakery, Well Dressed Foods, Kirbside Gardens and Merchia Farms, plus many more.

Though this is only the second season for The Wild Center market the sponsor, Adirondack Farmers’ Market Cooperative, marks its 20th anniversary this year. Celebrations will be taking place at farmers’ markets around the region this summer. The Wild Center market will host an anniversary event at the market on August 12th with music, a pie contest, crafts and more.

Buying local food can have great benefits for you and your neighborhood. Local food can be healthier for you, and there is something special that happens when you meet the people who have made the food that you feed your family.

The market will be held every Thursday through September 30th, rain or shine, from 11 am to 3 pm. The Wild Center outdoor grill will be open from 11 am- 2 pm featuring produce and meats from the market vendors. All related Farmer Market outdoor programming is free and open to the public. Admission to The Wild Center exhibits and additional programming is not included. For more information and directions please contact The Wild Center www.wildcenter.org or call 518-359-7800


Monday, June 21, 2010

Civilian Conservation Corps Reunions This Week

Reunions of Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) alumni, family, and friends, will be held at several locations this week, including in Franklin, Warren, Fulton, and Schenectady counties.

Marty Podskoch, CCC researcher, will give a short presentation and will invite participants to share memories of the camps at each of the events in anticipation of a forthcoming book on the CCC. You can check out his webpage here.

The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) began on March 31, 1933 under President Roosevelt’s “New Deal” to relieve the poverty and unemployment of the Depression. Camps were set up in many New York towns, state parks, & forests. Workers built trails, roads, campsites, dams, fire tower observer’s cabins & telephone lines; fought fires; stocked fish; and planted millions of trees. The CCC disbanded in 1942 due to the need for men in WW II.

Podskoch is a retired teacher and the author of five books: Fire Towers of the Catskills: Their History and Lore, two Adirondack fire tower books: Adirondack Fire Towers: Their History and Lore (volumes for the Southern and Northern Districts) and two other books, Adirondack Stories: Historical Sketches and Adirondack Stories II: Historical Sketches from his weekly illustrated newspaper column.

Podskoch is interested in meeting individuals who may have CCC stories to contribute to his next book. Marty Podskoch will have all of his books available after the presentation for sale and signing. For those unable to attend this reunion, Marty Podskoch has planned five other reunions:

June 22 6:30 pm Oneida Historical Society, 1608 Genesee St., Utica (315) 735-3642
June 23 6:30 pm Franklin Co. Hist. Society, 51 Milwaukee St. Malone (518) 483-2750
June 25 at the Schenectady County Historical Society, Schenectady, NY
June 26 1 pm Fulton Co. Hist. Society, 237 Kingsboro Ave., Gloversville (518) 725-8314
June 27 2 pm Bolton Landing Hist. Society, Bolton Free Library (518) 644-2233

If any one has information or pictures to share of relatives or friends who worked at one of the CCC camps, please contact Marty Podskoch at: 36 Waterhole Rd., Colchester, CT 06415 or 860-267-2442, or podskoch@comcast.net


Thursday, June 17, 2010

13th Annual Antique Car Show in Old Forge

The Central Adirondack Association has announced that the 13th Annual Central Adirondack Father’s Day Weekend Car Show in Old Forge will begin on Friday, June 18th at 7pm with a car parade down Main Street in Old Forge. On Saturday, June 19th the annual Car Show will take place from 9am – 3pm at the Hiltebrant Recreation Center on North Street. The show will feature classic antique vehicles and modified street rods.

Two cash prizes of $250 each, provided by Kratzenberg’s Masonry & Excavating, Inc. in Forestport, New York, will be awarded to the Best of Show cars in two categories, one for antiques/classics and one for modified/street rods. Trophies will be awarded to 18 classes of vehicles, and dash plaques will be given to the first 100 registrants. Awards will also be presented for Spectators’ Choice, Oldest Vehicle, and Longest Distance Driven.

A spectator admission fee of $2 will be charged, and children under 12 will be admitted free. Anyone interested in registering his or her vehicle for this judged show could do so at the gate on Saturday morning for a fee of $10. Cars must be on the field by noon to be judged. Auto swap meet vendors are welcome to participate by completing a registration form and paying a $10 fee.

Food will be available from the Old Forge Fire Auxiliary, including chili, hamburgers, hot dogs, desserts, and drinks.

In case of rain, the event will be held inside the pavilion on a first-come, first-served basis.

More information about the weekend’s events can be obtained from the Old Forge Visitor Information Center at 315- 369-6983 or www.OldForgeNY.com.

Photo: Modified 1956 Chevrolet Belair owned by Brittany Busa from Sauquoit, New York.


Thursday, June 17, 2010

John Brown Lives! Honors Juneteenth With Event

June 19th commemorates “Juneteenth”, the oldest known celebration of the end of slavery in the United States, and is observed in more than 30 states. It is also known as Freedom Day, or Emancipation Day. Join us in honoring “Juneteenth” with an author reception for Scott Christianson, author of the critically acclaimed book Freeing Charles: The Struggle to Free a Slave on the Eve of the Civil War (University of Illinois Press, 2010).

Scott will speak about the life and dramatic rescue of a captured fugitive slave from Virginia, Charles Nalle, who was liberated by Harriet Tubman and others in Troy, NY in 1860. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 16, 2010

Lake Placid Institute Announces Roundtable Series

The Lake Placid Institute for the Arts and Humanities welcomes prominent professionals to speak at the annual Adirondack Roundtable series. Taking place on Saturday mornings, these breakfast lectures are open to the public and offer a diverse array of speakers. Throughout June, July, and August, the Roundtable takes place at 8:30am at the Crowne Plaza Lake Placid Resort.

On June 26th, Actor Chris Noth will begin the Roundtable series by discussing “An Actor’s Life.” A graduate from the Yale School of Drama, he has had a successful career in film, television, and on stage. Noth is most well-known for his role as Detective Mike Logan on Law and Order: Criminal Intent and as Mr. Big on HBO’s Sex and the Cityopposite Sarah Jessica Parker, a role for which he received a Golden Globe Nomination. He can currently be seen in the movie Sex and the City II, a movie based on the television series and also on CBS’ show The Good Wife.

July 10th, Jim Burrows, a successful director and producer, will discuss “Maintaining a Private Life in Show Business.” He has directed many successful shows includingThe Mary Tyler Moore Show, Cheers, Friends, Will & Grace, and Two and a Half Men. He has been nominated for an Emmy Award 24 times in 26 years, winning 5 times.

July 17th, John Cooney, a prominent writer, will discuss “News Without Newspapers.” A former reporter, editor, and foreign correspondent for The Wall Street Journal,Cooney has worked in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Central America, Europe and the Middle East. His work in Cuba was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. He has also written non-fiction books, in particular, The Annenbergs, for which he received the University of Missouri Journalism School’s Research award and a Pulitzer Prize nomination. His fiction works include A Better Place to Die and Acts of Contrition.

August 14th, the Roundtable will conclude with Howard Stahl discussing “Saving Historic Properties: Economic, Aesthetic, & Practical Considerations.” A trial attorney and a partner in the law firm Steptoe & Johnson, he is a member of the Litigation, Business Solutions, and International Departments. His work led to his listing in Leading Lawyers 2007. In addition, Stahl has purchased, restored, opened for public viewing, and sold a number of historic homes. He also is knowledgeable about tax and easement incentives for preservation initiatives.

The Adirondack Roundtable begins at 8:30am, with registration starting at 8:00am at the Crowne Plaza Lake Placid Resort. Each event is $30 with a reservation or $35 at the door and includes a breakfast buffet. Please call the Lake Placid Institute at 518-523-1312 for advance registration.


Saturday, June 12, 2010

Upper Saranac Cookbook Sales Fight Milfoil

A hardcover cookbook containing more than 500 tried-and-true recipes from residents of Upper Saranac Lake and their families and friends is on sale in Tri-Lakes museums, gift shops and book stores. All proceeds will benefit the fight against invasive milfoil on Upper Saranac Lake.

The Upper Saranac Cookbook: An Adirondack Treasury of 500 Recipes was created by volunteers from Upper Saranac who worked for nine months to produce the approximately 500-page book as a charitable project. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Adirondack Family Activities: Lake Placid Film Forum

Celebrating its 10th anniversary the Lake Placid Film Forum is showcasing women in the film industry, new directions in filmmaking and an environmental “green” focus in additional to its annual tribute to silent film.

Opening night on June 10th will be a bargain for families at $10 for two Buster Keaton movies and a foreign short “Salim Baba.” The Keaton films will show his career in reverse starting with the 1965 “Railrodder” with a Q&A with the film’s director Gerry Potterton then segue to the 1924 silent film “Sherlock Jr.”

Organist Jeff Barker will accompany “Sherlock Jr.” on the Palace Theatre’s 3/7 Robert-Morton Theatre Pipe Organ. The fully restored organ was originally installed in 1926 so only seems appropriate this 1926 gem will be in attendance to a 1924 classic.

We have been fortunate to see the Palace Theatre’s classically restored organ put to use. We watched the organist with as much enthusiasm as the film. He played without the benefit of sheet music; he just watched the screen, playing the score. It was magnificent to see the impact the live instrumental had on the film and the audience.

Though the Lake Placid Film Forum has a range of ratings, families can find plenty of reason to attend this cultural treat. All families can be entertained on Sunday, June 12 with the “Summer of Walter Hacks.” An older teen audience will garner insight to hardcore skaters through this Appalachian skate park film, “Skatopia: 88 Acres of Anarchy”.

A last minute addition for children ages 11 to 14 is an on-camera acting workshop conducted by Kevin Craig West. Held at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts on June 12 from 9:00 a.m. – noon for a $40.00 fee. Interested parties should contact Lake Placid Film Forum Artistic Director Kathleen Carroll at 523-3456.

This year the Lake Placid Film Forum (July 10-13) will feature actor Parker Posey, well known independent film actor from numerous Christopher Guest films and other projects, as well as veteran actor Hal Holbrook. A range of filmmakers, producers and authors are scheduled through out the weekend for panel discussions and talk-backs.

In addition to the screenings, “Sleepless in Lake Placid” is back for the 4th year. This invitation only, 24-hour student film competition will pit students from RIT, Ithaca College, SUNY Purchase, Syracuse University and Burlington College against each other for the Robin Pell Emerging Filmmaker Award.

The film screenings will be taking place at a variety of Lake Placid venues. Film screening vouchers are $10 per show and available for purchase 45 minutes before show time. The scheduled “conversations” and panel discussions” are free and open to the public on a first come-first serve policy. Please call 518-523-3456 for more information.

photo used with permission from the Lake Placid Film Forum


Saturday, June 5, 2010

The Great Adirondack Birding Celebration

This weekend marks the 8th Annual Great Adirondack Birding Celebration, hosted by the Adirondack Park Agency’s Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) at Paul Smiths. This annual event draws as many as 400 visitors to the region. This year participants have come from throughout the Northeast down to Maryland and Virginia and as far away as Texas. Highlights of the Celebration include field trips both Saturday and Sunday mornings led by local experts to to birding hotspots such as Bloomingdale Bog, Madawaska, Spring Pond Bog, Whiteface Mountain, as well as the Paul Smiths VIC. Birders hope to see boreal bird specialities such as the Black-backed Woodpecker, shown at the left, as well as Spruce Grouse, Boreal Chickadee, Olive-sided Flycatcher, and many northern warblers. More than 160 species have been seen over the eight years of this birding festival. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 3, 2010

Newcomb Visitor Interpretive Center Hosting GPS Workshop

On Saturday, June 5, the Visitor Interpretive Center at Newcomb will offer beginning level Global Positioning System (GPS) training from 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. This “hands on” workshop is for people interested in learning more about using a GPS. It will focus on how to operate a GPS receiver and will cover basic GPS features, terms, and functions. GPS skills will be practiced both indoors and outdoors. Adirondack Connections, a private guide and trip planning service based in Tupper Lake, will conduct the training and provide Garmin eTrex GPS units for participants to use throughout the class.

Pre-registration and pre-payment is required by Wednesday, May 26th. The course fee is $55/person (includes materials, batteries, and GPS to use). The fee for members of the Adirondack Park Institute, the “friends group” for the VICs, is $50/person.

The Newcomb VIC is located on NYS Route 28N just west of the Hamlet of Newcomb, Essex County. For information and to pre-register, call the VIC at 518-582-2000.

The Adirondack Park Agency’s two Visitor Interpretive Centers at Newcomb and Paul Smiths are slated to be closed at the end of this year due to the state’s fiscal situation.


Wednesday, June 2, 2010

Black Fly Challenge: On Your Mark, Get Set, Swat!

With the name like the Black Fly Challenge, the Central Adirondacks’ premiere bike race does not exactly encourage spectators.

That’s a pity, because this year may prove more interesting than most. Among the expected 300 participants is expected to be riders of a three-person bicycle and a unicyclist.

That’s right — a man (presumably — one assumes women would have more sense) and a single wheel, riding dirt and paved roads for 40 miles.

“That whole unicycling thing has taken off,” said race co-organizer Ted Christodaro of the Inlet store Pedals and Petals.

The Black Fly Challenge engenders this sort of tomfoolery. While some racers may take it seriously, others are just in it for a good time. The ride is 40 miles of paved and unpaved roads with no technical challenges to speak of, aside from a few medium-size hills. It’s a grand welcome to the summer cycling season in the North Country.

The race has changed somewhat from the days it was solely a mountain bike event. These days, so many people ride it on cyclocross bike — downhill frames and wheels with knobby tires, used for all-terrain races in the fall — that organizers created a separate category.

The cyclocross riders have the advantage, since they have larger wheels and get more distance with each crank of the pedal. However, those skinny tires are also more susceptible to flat tires — which means the rider becomes victim to the inevitable bug bites.

When I rode the race two years ago (without a flat tire, I might add), I found that the only bugs that bothered me were the few that slipped down between the vents in my helmet. Forward-thinking cyclists might consider taping strips of bug netting to seal up the holes. Or just ride harder and hope for the best.

It was the bystanders who seemed to get bugs the worst. The volunteers along the plains, where the heart of the race takes place, either wore full-jacket bug nets or suffered the swatting of the damned.

Still, the race is worth catching, for those who don’t already plan to take part. This year it starts from Inlet, at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, June 12, and ends in Indian Lake.

“With so many races in the books, there’s no shortage of wild stories from ‘out there in the Plains,’ the organizers say on their web site. “Bikes have crossed the Finish Line with no seat, flat tires, broken rims and even on the shoulder of a few determined competitors.”

While some were apparently worried the race might not take place due to the state’s threatened closure of the Moose River Plains area, Christodaro says that never would have happened anyway because the state had already issued a permit for the race and had planned to honor it.

Anyway, the plains are open, the road is in good shape and the black flies are waiting. Let the pedaling begin!

For more information on the Black Fly Challenge, click here.