Thursday, January 28, 2010

Adirondack Music Scene:Amateurs, Soloists and Large Ensemble Concerts

We have an eclectic bunch of music events to choose from this week. Everything from amateur jams to serious solo and ensemble performances.

I’m personally going with the open minded mic tonight and the last of the January Jams on Sunday because I know how awesome that many talented people in one place can be. Also I’ve been checking out Peter Griggs online and I think his music is beautiful as well as educational.

Thursday, January 28th:

In Saranac Lake, Open Minded Mic Night at BluSeed Studios! The best open mic for audiences and performers in the north country. Sign up is at 7 pm and the show gets underway at 7:30 pm. Wonderful blues guitarist and singer Steve Langdon is hosting. There is a $3 cover. Stay until the end and vote for the best in show.

Friday, January 29th:

In Jay, Peter Griggs will be performing many different guitar styles including bossa nova, nuevo flamenco and blues guitar. This is a JEMS production to be held at the Amos and Julia Ward Theatre. The concert starts at 7 pm.

In Warrensburg, Dreaded Wheat is performing at George Henry’s. They play from 9:30 pm to midnight.

Saturday, January 30th:

In Plattsburgh, the Adirondack Wind Ensemble will perform at 2 pm. It will be held at the E. Glenn Giltz Auditorium in Hawkins Hall at SUNY. General admission is $10 and students get in for free.

In Long Lake, The Long Lake Razz ( LLCS Jazz Band) and The Garrison/Leblanc Trio will be performing for the annual Chocolate Fest benefiting the library. The benefit concert will be held at the Long Lake Town Hall from 6:30 to 9:30 pm.

In Wilmington, Is is the band and Steinhoff’s is the place. Unfortunately their website is under construction but I hear they are a talented 3 piece jazz band. There is no cover and they start around 10 pm.

In Saranac Lake a Scottish Musical Evening will be held at Will Rogers by the St. Andrews Society of the Adirondacks. The event starts at 6:30 pm and costs $5. Call 891-2165 for more information.

In Warrensburg, James Hood is at George Henry’s. He plays from 8 – 11 pm.

Sunday, January 31st:

In Lake Placid, the Adirondack Wind Ensemble will perform at 1:30pm at LPCA. Tickets are $10 , students can attend for free.

In Upper Jay, the last of the January Jams at The Recovery Lounge. A fun experience for families as well as musicians. It starts at 2 pm and runs until 6 pm.

In Keene Valley, Peter Griggs will be performing “500 Years of Music for Guitar”. This event is put on by the East Branch Friends of the Arts at the Keene Valley Congregational Church and starts at 4 pm.

Photo: Peter Griggs


Saturday, January 23, 2010

4-H Adirondack Guide Program Announced

The 4-H Adirondack Guide Program is a unique program designed for boys and girls 12 to 18 years old who are interested in in-depth exploration of natural resources, gaining knowledge in the biological sciences, and developing outdoor recreation teaching and leadership skills.

4-H Adirondack Guide Program activities include field trips and classes, canoe and hiking trips, and community service projects. Participants learns such skills as map and compass reading; canoeing; tree, plant, flower and wildlife identification; environmental teaching techniques; woods lore and safety; first aid and lifeguard training; outdoor clothing and equipment; wilderness trip coordination, and the use of global positioning systems (GPS). Participants have the opportunity to work with licensed Adirondack Guides, Forest Rangers, Fish and Wildlife Biologists, Foresters and skilled woodsmen. The program is conducted in an informal atmosphere, conducive to building confidence and self-esteem.

The program, sponsored by Cornell University Cooperative Extension, allows participants to advance from the Apprentice Guide level, through Intermediate, to full Senior 4-H Adirondack Guide status.

An orientation meeting for the 4-H Adirondack Guide Program will be held Thursday, February 18, 2010 7:00 p.m. at the Cornell Cooperative Extension Education Center, 377 Schroon River Road in Warrensburg, NY.

For more information, or to register, please call the Cornell Cooperative Extension office at 623-3291 or 668-4881 to register. For further information, ask to speak with John Bowe.

Photo: 4-H Adirondack Guide program participants Ben Hoffman and Sabrina Fish starting a fire.


Friday, January 22, 2010

A Sense of Place: American Impressionists at The Hyde

Enter the Hyde Collection’s Charles R. Wood Gallery, where the stunning new exhibition, “An Enduring Legacy: American Impressionist Paintings from the Thomas Clark Collection,” is displayed, and among the first things you’ll notice is that the paintings are grouped roughly by geography, or according to the regions depicted by these early 20th century artists: the New England coast, Vermont, the Hudson Valley, California.

Far from being arbitrary or eccentric, that curatorial choice cleverly elucidates an intention shared by almost every artist represented in the show.

These American Impressionists, explains curator Erin Coe, “were deeply committed to making art that reflected the spirit of America and its distinctive scenery.”

Or, as Coe writes in the catalogue that accompanies the exhibition, “the landscape painters of the first third of the twentieth century were overtly nationalistic in their outlook, seeking to create a more authentic American variant of Impressionism…”

To realize that ambition, those artists were compelled to train their eyes on a particular region, if only because the American landscape is defined by its diversity and lack of uniformity. An American landscape is necessarily a local landscape.

“The works in the Clark Collection offer a comprehensive treatment of these regional schools of Impressionist activity in America,” says Coe.

For instance, the show includes three paintings by Arthur James Emery Powell (1864-1956) of the long-settled, deeply cultivated valleys of Dutchess County.

All three portray winter landscapes, for reasons at least partially explained by Coe in a lecture she delivered at The Hyde on January 17.

Winter landscapes, she said, are “the visual equivalent of a poem by Robert Frost,” that most self-consciously regional of American poets.

Approximately one quarter of the paintings collected by Thomas Clark are winter landscapes, Coe noted, in part because winter is the quintessential American season.

Perhaps it’s co-incidental that Dutchess county was a hotbed of anti-federalism in the 18th century, and that places like Vermont, New Hampshire and Massachusetts have shown separatist tendencies at different times in our history. It’s no co-incidence, though, that the artists included in this exhibition chose to paint in places with strong regional identities. The landscapes these artists selected for their subject matter were chosen in part because they exemplified a region’s characteristic and recognizable qualities.

But of equal, if not greater importance, Coe said, those landscapes were the locations of artists’ colonies that flourished in the early part of the 20th century in places like Old Lyme, Connecticut; Cape Ann, Massachusetts; New Hope, Pennsylvania; and Woodstock, New York, as well as in Vermont and California.

The traditions of European and American painting were transmitted through those colonies and schools, producing the unique vision that is embodied in Clark’s collection.

“These artists were the students and sketching partners of the seminal figures in the development of Impressionism in America, such as William Merritt Chase, Willard L. Metcalf, John Henry Twachtman, and Robert Henri,” Coe said.

Thomas Clark, who lives in Saratoga County, has promised to donate this collection of paintings to The Hyde, and this exhibition is to some extent a celebration of that gift.

“An Enduring Legacy: American Impressionist Landscape Paintings from the Thomas Clark Collection,” will remain on view at The Hyde through March 18.

The Hyde Collection is located at 161 Warren Street in downtown Glens Falls. For more information, call The Hyde at 792-1761.

For more news from Lake George, read the Lake George Mirror

Illustration: Arthur James E. Powell, American (1864-1956), Mid-Winter, Dutchess County, ca. 1920s, oil on canvas, 25 x 30 in., Promised Gift of Thomas Clark. Courtesy of The Hyde Collection


Sunday, January 17, 2010

Adirondack Literary Awards – Call For Submissions

The Adirondack Center for Writing (ACW) is seeking submissions for its 5th Annual ACW Literary Awards. Begun in 2006, the Adirondack Literary Awards are one of the most popular events of the ACW schedule. The deadline for submissions is March 8, 2010. What follows is the submission guidelines from ACW.

Those wishing to submit a book published in 2009 to be considered for an award should send two copies of the book to Director Nathalie Thill, at the ACW office with a brief cover letter including author’s contact information and description of the book’s “qualifications.” Is the author from the Adirondack region, or is the book about or influenced by the Adirondacks in some way? The cover letter should also name which category the author would like the book to be judged under: fiction, poetry, children’s literature, memoir, nonfiction, or photography. There is no entry fee. Do not include a SASE; books cannot be returned but will become part of reading rooms or libraries. The mailing address is: Adirondack Center for Writing, Paul Smith’s College, PO Box 265, Paul Smiths, New York 12970. Questions may be directed to Nathalie Thill at ACW at 518-327-6278 or [email protected]

Winners will be recognized at an awards ceremony to be held in June (date TBA via ACW website) at the Blue Mountain Center, which donates space and resources for the event. In addition to awards in each category mentioned above, there is a People’s Choice Award as part of this festive program. For a complete list of 2009 award winners, please check out the ACW Newsletter/Annual Report at our web site, www.adirondackcenterforwriting.org. Most of the books considered for awards are made available for purchase at the ceremony by the authors, and they are happy to sign their books.

The Adirondack Center for Writing is a resource and educational organization that provides support to writers and enhances literary activity and communication throughout the Adirondacks. ACW benefits both emerging and established writers and develops literary audiences by encouraging partnerships among existing regional organizations to promote diverse programs. ACW is based at Paul Smith’s College and is supported by membership and the New York State Council on the Arts.


Sunday, January 17, 2010

Hyde Collection Announces 2010 Exhibition Schedule

The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls has announced its 2010 Exhibition Schedule. This year’s schedule includes American Impressionist landscape paintings, twentieth-century Modern art, a regional juried high school art show, a major exhibition of the work of Andrew Wyeth, and the museum will also play host for the first time to the long-running Artists of the Mohawk-Hudson Region, an annual juried show founded in 1936. The complete schedule from the Hyde Collection announcement is below.

Through Sunday, March 28, 2010
An Enduring Legacy:
American Impressionist Landscape Paintings from the Thomas Clark Collection

This exhibition presents sixty-four paintings from the private collection of Saratoga
County, New York resident Thomas Clark. For twenty years, Clark has been amassing a significant group of pre-1940 American Impressionist landscape paintings with more than 100 works in the collection. Considered one of the finest private collections of this genre in upstate New York, it is testament to the enduring legacy of Impressionist painting in American art.

The collection, on public display for the first time, comprises examples from the last
great generation of landscape painters who emerged during, and in the aftermath of, the American Impressionist movement (1880-1920). Many of these artists were students and/or sketching partners of the seminal figures in Impressionism in America, such as William Merritt Chase and John Henry Twachtman. The Collection offers a comprehensive treatment of the regional schools of Impressionist activity in America. Forty-seven artists are featured in the exhibition, including Walter Emerson Baum, John Joseph Enneking, Emile A. Gruppé, Hayley Lever, Frederick Mulhaupt, George Loftus Noyes, and Harry A. Vincent. The exhibition is curated by Erin Coe, chief curator and deputy director of The Hyde Collection and is accompanied by an illustrated catalogue. Clark has announced his intention to make a future donation of his remarkable collection to The Hyde where it will greatly enhance the Museum’s current holdings of American art.

Through February 28, 2010
Divided by a common language?
British and American Works from the Murray Collection

Approximately twenty works of twentieth-century Modern art, donated to the Museum by the late Jane Murray, are on display in Hoopes Gallery. Works included in this exhibition were part of the first significant donation of twentieth-century art received by The Hyde and helped to form the foundation of the Museum’s Modernist holdings. Jane Murray passed away in April 2009 and bequeathed the remainder of her substantial collection to the Museum.

Curated by The Hyde’s Executive Director David F. Setford, the exhibition reflects one woman’s journey into the world of art and the creative process itself. Represented in the exhibition are British artists including Ben Nicholson, Barbara Hepworth, John Piper, Howard Hodgkin, and Paul Mount. American artists include Gregory Amenoff, American, b. 1948, Gregory Amenoff, Betty Parsons, Stuart Davis, and Ellsworth Kelly. The works selected examine the similarities and differences between American and British works of the period, as both are areas of particular strength in the Murray
Murray Collection.

April 11 through May 23
Nineteenth Regional Juried High School Art Show

The Hyde proudly hosts one hundred works in various media by the best of area high
school art students. Entries into the competition average approximately 1,200 per year
and the top 100 works were chosen by jurors to be highlighted in this annual spring event, showcased in the Museum’s Charles R. Wood Gallery.

This unique show allows participating students to experience the preparation, submission, and jurying process crucial to their artistic development. The young artists entering the competition hail from as many as forty area schools located in Warren, Washington, Saratoga, Hamilton, and Essex counties.

June 12 through September 5
Andrew Wyeth: An American Legend

The Hyde Collection introduces the broad span of work by Andrew Wyeth in its major summer exhibition for 2010. Organized by The Hyde and curated by Executive Director David F. Setford and Deputy Director and Chief Curator Erin B. Coe in association with the Farnsworth Art Museum of Rockland, Maine, the exhibition will mark the first opportunity since the artist’s death in 2009 to begin to critically reevaluate his contribution to and position in American art of the twentieth century. Works will include pencil, watercolor, dry brush, and tempera works, and will feature sections devoted to early coastal watercolors and landscape paintings, as well as a look at Wyeth’s models, his interest in vernacular architecture, and his connection
with the Regionalist tradition and Magic Realism.

The exhibition will feature approximately fifty works, with the core from the Farnsworth Art Museum. Also on view will be The Hyde’s own Wyeth – The Ledge and the Island, 1937 – and major works from Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Hood Museum of Art, as well as from other museums and private collections.

The Museum continues its summer collaborations with other arts organizations in the region by coordinating a series of lectures, exhibitions, and performances with Wyeth-related themes.

October 10 through December 12
Exhibition by Artists of the Mohawk-Hudson Region

For the first time, The Hyde Collection is host of the Artists of the Mohawk-Hudson Region, one of the longest-running collaborative juried exhibitions in the country. The Museum joins the Albany Institute of History and Art and the University Art Museum at the University at Albany as the third collaborative sponsor of the exhibition, which is hosted by the organizations on a rotating basis. Founded in 1936, this annual show provides a leading benchmark for contemporary art in the Upper Hudson Valley. The exhibition is open to artists residing within a 100-mile radius of either Glens Falls or the Capital District. Past jurors have included artists, curators, critics, art historians, and art dealers such as Edward Hopper (1941), George Rickey (1971), Kenneth Noland (1977), Wolf Kahn (1980), Grace Gluck (1984), Dan Cameron (1997), and Ivan Karp (2005).

For the 2010 exhibition, The Hyde has invited Charles Desmarais, the Deputy Director of Art at the Brooklyn Museum, to be the guest juror. Mr. Desmarais leads the Brooklyn Museum’s collection, conservation, education, exhibition, and library departments.


Saturday, January 16, 2010

Master Gardener Training Set to Begin January 25th

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Warren County is now accepting applications for their Master Gardener volunteer program which will begin on January 25th. The Master Gardener Training program provides Cornell University faculty, Cooperative Extension staff, and local experts who teach volunteers a wide range of horticultural topics including Basic Botany, Entomology, Soils, Home Lawn Care, Vegetable and Fruit Gardening, Composting, Organic Gardening, and more. The trainings are held in Ballston Spa on Mondays from late January to mid April.

After completing the 12-week training program, volunteers Master Gardeners are relied on to help answer the large number of phone calls that County Extension offices handle during the gardening season. Master Gardener volunteers also provide gardening information to community groups, school children, and the gardening public through lectures, pH soil clinics, demonstration gardens, articles in a monthly newsletter, and garden workshops.

Master Gardeners are also provided with advanced training and are encouraged to attend state and regional conferences as well as Master Gardener sponsored garden tours.

For more information call Julie Nathanson at 518-623-3291 or 518-668-4881.

Photo: Julie Nathanson, CCE Community Educator and Sandy Vanno Master Gardener.

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Monday, January 4, 2010

Adirondack Architectural Heritage Ski Tour Announced

Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) will kick-off their 2011 educational series with an interpretive cross-country ski into the 19th-century, Adirondack Great Camp, Camp Santanoni. Participants will learn about the camp’s history and the architectural significance that makes it a National Historic Landmark. The 10-mile round trip ski, along the preserve’s gently sloping historic carriage road, leads us into the majestic wilderness estate. Participants will visit the camp’s three complexes; the Gate Lodge, the Farm, and the Main Camp, the design of architect Robert Robertson.

The tour will be led by AARCH staff and John Friauf, former AARCH Board Member. The group will depart Santanoni Preserve parking area, off Route 28N in the hamlet of Newcomb at 10AM, returning around 3 PM. This is a remote site so participants are encouraged to bring a trail lunch and plenty of hydration. The fee is $20 for members and $30 for non-members. Advance registration is required by calling AARCH at (518) 834-9328.

Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) is the private, non-profit, historic preservation organization for the Adirondack Park region. AARCH works in partnership with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the Town of Newcomb to preserve and interpret Camp Santanoni.

This tour is one of over fifty events in our annual series highlighting the region’s architectural legacy. For more information on AARCH including membership and a complete 2011 program schedule contact AARCH at (518) 834-9328 or visit their website.

Photo: Recent repairs on part of the extensive covered porches at main camp, Camp Santanoni during winter. Photo courtesy AARCH.


Saturday, January 2, 2010

Winter Wildays at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake

The Wild Center’s Winter Wildays return in every Saturday and Sunday from January 9th until March 28th 2010 with an entertaining and enlightening schedule for the whole family. Here is the announcement from a Wild Center press release:

Saturday events grow your skills. Learn more about easy ways to reduce your carbon footprint with Home Composting, Heating with Biomass or Small Windpower in the Adirondacks. Admire some of the wildlife, like Boreal Birds or the Timber Rattlesnake, that make their home in the Adirondacks. Improve your photography skills with leading photographer Carl Heilman or discover what it takes to raise chickens in your own backyard. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, December 30, 2009

14th Annual Adirondack International Mountainfest

If you still want to take courses at the 14th Annual Adirondack International Mountainfest in Keene, you’d better act now.

The festival, which takes place January 15–17 (Martin Luther King Jr. weekend), is nearly sold out. The only seminars still open are an ice-climbing and slide-climbing course on Sunday and courses on avalanche safety.

However, those who love the mountains and are happy to appreciate them from a heated room should consider two events that weekend. At 8 p.m. Friday, January 15, world-famous mountaineer Erik Weihenmayer will give a slide show and lecture. Weihenmayer is the only blind climber to not only have summited Mt. Everest but also the highest peaks of all seven continents. Weihenmayer recently climbed The Naked Edge, a rock-climbing testpiece in Colorado’s Eldorado Canyon, rated a stiff 5.11.

At 7:30 p.m. Saturday, January 16, extreme mountaineer Steve House will also do a presentation. Considered one of the best alpinists in the world, the climber and author has made dozens of dicy ascents up high-altitude snow, ice and rock routes all over the world. He is known for free-soloing (no ropes or partners) massive faces with little gear. In 2005, in one of his greatest accomplishments, he and a partner completed a new route on the deadly, 13,500-foot-high Rupal Face, the most technical of the many dangerous faces of Pakistan’s Nanga Parbat (26,600).

House is also leading an ice-climbing seminar on Saturday but—sorry, kids—that one’s sold out.

The slide shows, $10 each, will be at the Keene Central School on Market Street in Keene Valley, off Route 73 (just follow the cars if you can’t find it). There’s also an all-you-can-eat pasta dinner at the nearby firehouse from 5 to 7 p.m. on Saturday. And you can demo climbing gear for no charge at Rock and River’s manmade ice wall, located at the end of Alstead Hill Lane, located on Route 73 just west of Keene. All events benefit local charities.

For more information, click here.

 


Tuesday, December 29, 2009

2010 Adirondack Donegal Beard Contest

It’s that time of year again, where all the world becomes, as Jack London would say, bald face. It’s time to shave down for this year’s Adirondack Donegal Beard Contest.

A Donegal Beard (also called a chin-curtain or Lincoln) is a particular style of Irish hirsute appendage (facial hair) that grows along the jaw line and covers the chin — no soul patch, no mustache.

In order to take part in the contest (and all are welcome) contestants must be clean shaven January 1st and grow a Donegal Beard by St. Patrick’s Day. On the day of the contest — which will be held at Black Mountain Inn at the corner of Peaceful Valley Road and Route 8 in Johnsburg (North Creek), 4 to 7 pm — all beards must conform to the Donegal standard.

Contestants are judged on the following criteria:

1. Length
2. Fullness
3. Style and Sophistication
4. General Manliness

To see pictures from last year’s contest, and to join the Facebook group, go here.

Photo: 2009 Adirondack Donegal Beard Contestants.


Friday, December 25, 2009

Adirondack Music Scene:Acoustic, Brass and a Musical New Years Eve

Wow, it’s been such a crazy busy week that I nearly forgot to find out what gigs are happening where. Anyway, I hope everyone has been having a great holiday season and for those celebrating Christmas, I hope your day is very merry, full of friends, good food, family and ,of course, great music!

On Wednesday I did get to hear and dance to a great show put on by The Pine Ridge Rounders. They played the Waterhole’s First Annual Santa’s Ball and it was a successful first in my book. The bluegrass was hot and even though more costumes would have been appreciated, those that did participate made the Christmas Sweater Contest funny and gives us a new reason to get excited (did we need more?) over those familial yarn creations. Overheard comment from a Virginian: “They’re good but where’s the fiddle? “

First Night In Saranac Lake is my personal “must-see” this week. With an almost overwhelming amount of acts to check out, it’d be wise to start planning now. Two tips: get your buttons soon, they sold out last year and make sure you get to your event early as the venues fill up fast.

Saturday, December 26th:

In North Creek, Dreaded Wheat is playing at Laura’s. The show starts at 9 pm and lasts until 1 am.

In Queensbury, the UU Church is hosting a last Saturday of the month Coffee House & Open Mic Night. You can call (518) 793-1468 for more information.

Tuesday, December 29th:

In North Creek at the Tannery Pond Community Center, The Potsdam Brass Quintet will be giving at concert at 7:30 pm.

Wednesday, December 30th:

In Saranac Lake at Saranac Village at Will Rogers , The Dogs of Jazz will play for their New Year’s Eve Party which is held between 7:00 and 9:30 pm.

Thursday, December 31st:

First Night in Saranac Lake at multiple venues. I’ll be checking out Big Slyde at BluSeed starting at 7 pm, Frankenpine at Pendragon Theater from 8 – 9 pm and performing with The Dust Bunnies from 10 – 11 pm and 11 pm – 12 am. There are plenty of other great acts to choose from, so check the First Night schedule for details.

In North Creek at barVino, the Tony Jenkins Jazz Trip plays from 9 pm to midnight.

In Saranac Lake at The Waterhole, Pie Boys Flat (an excellent band) opens at 8 pm for Hot Day at The Zoo starts at 10 pm.

Photo: Mike Packard from Dreaded Wheat


Thursday, December 17, 2009

Adirondack Music Scene: Songwriters and Holiday Concerts

Well, I’m back from my trip and I’m sorry to say the music scene I’d hoped to encounter didn’t emerge; even guitar strings were hard to come by. It is truly eye-opening to see how fortunate we are to have such an art-oriented community. I think it’s easy to forget , not in the least because we live in the same state as cultural mecca NYC, how many places in the world have only the radio and recordings to stimulate the ears. So, get out there and support our huge pool of talent, starting tonight with Open Minded Mic Night at BluSeed Studios. I’ll be there at 7 pm.
My other recommendation is to carol if the opportunity presents itself. You could create that opportunity by gathering up a posse of your own. I was encouraged last year for the first time in many to join a group and it was so much fun I’m doing it again without question. Yes, it’s cold and doesn’t always sound great but the camaraderie is warming and sometimes, if you sing really loud, you get invited in for treats.

Thursday, December 17th:

In Saranac Lake, at BluSeed Studios, Open Minded Mic starts at 7:30 pm. Sign up is at 7 pm and there is a $3 cover.

In Glens Falls at the Charles R. Wood Theater, The Glens Falls Community Band is holding a Holiday Concert starting at 8 pm.

Saturday, December 19th:

In Upper Jay at The Recovery Lounge John Scarpulla will be passing a hat. This singer songwriter plays some lovely guitar to go with a sweet voice from what I’ve heard on line – the show starts at 8 pm.

In Lake Placid at LPCAthey are having their 9th annual Adirondack Christmas. The concert features Peggy Lynn, Dan Duggan , Roy Hurd and Frank Orsini. It starts at 7 pm, tickets are $12.

In Saranac Lake, Sven Curth is at the Waterhole. You can check out a video for his fun new song called “Jesus Loves Tractors” It’s a free show!

Sunday, December 20th:

In Saranac Lake at Will Rogers, the Madrigal Singers will being giving their Christmas Concert from 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm. Call 891 -7117 with questions. It’s free!


Monday, December 21st:

In Saranac Lake at the High School Auditorium the Winter Concert will begin at 7 pm. This night features the Jazz Ensemble, Festival Chorus, Vocal Ensembles, Concert Choir and Concert Band. Phone 897 – 1473 with questions, it too is free!

Wednesday, December 23rd:

In Saranac Lake at The Waterhole The Pine Ridge Rounders, a local bluegrass band, are featured at Santa’s Ball. They hit the stage at 10 pm.

Photo: John Scarpulla


Saturday, December 12, 2009

APA Schedules Hearings on Boathouse Regulations

The Adirondack Park Agency (APA) has scheduled four public hearings to encourage comments on the agency’s proposed revisions to its Boathouse regulations. Designed to protect ecologically sensitive shorelines, boathouse regulations, were first adopted in 1979 and revised in 2002. This newest proposed revision limits the overall footprint of boathouses to 900 square feet and the height to fifteen feet. This criteria revises the previous “single story” limitation, which was being violated with large “attics” and rooftop decks, according to the APA, and clarifies that boathouses are for boat storage only.

The proposed revisions would continue prohibitions on using boat houses for anything but boats, building’s constructed for other uses will be required to meet with APA shoreline setbeck regulations. According to the APA public hearing announcement, “other structures such as decks, guest cottages, and recreation rooms are prohibited on the shoreline if greater than 100 square feet in size. Under prior regulations, landowners attached these components as part of what would otherwise be a boat berthing structure, and argued these components were part of the “boathouse” because the previous definitions did not specifically exclude them.”

Here are the further details from the APA:

The 2002 definition limited boathouses to a “single story.” However, the definition fails to prohibit large “attics,” and extensive rooftop decks, resulting in some very large non-jurisdictional shoreline structures. The lack of clarity requires architect’s plans and time-consuming staff evaluation.

The 2009 proposal retains the 2002 provisions that define “boathouse” to mean “a covered structure with direct access to a navigable body of water which (1) is used only for the storage of boats and associated equipment; (2) does not contain bathroom facilities, sanitary plumbing, or sanitary drains of any kind; (3) does not contain kitchen facilities of any kind; (4) does not contain a heating system of any kind; (5) does not contain beds or sleeping quarters of any kind”.

The proposal adds: “(6) has a footprint of 900 square feet or less measured at exterior walls, a height of fifteen feet or less, and a minimum roof pitch of four on twelve for all rigid roof surfaces. Height shall be measured from the surface of the floor serving the boat berths to the highest point of the structure.”

The change is prospective only; lawful existing boathouse structures may be repaired or replaced pursuant to Section 811 of the APA Act within the existing building envelope. For those who wish to exceed the size parameters or expand a larger existing boathouse, a variance will be required. Standard shoreline cutting and wetland jurisdictional predicates still apply in all cases.

Shorelines are important to the Adirondack Park’s communities and environment. The dynamic ecosystems that edge Adirondack Park lakes, wetlands, rivers, and streams are critical to both terrestrial and aquatic species. Well-vegetated shorelines serve as buffer strips, protecting banks from erosion, safeguarding water quality, cooling streams, and providing some of the Park’s most productive wildlife habitat.

Large structures and intensive use at the shoreline causes unnecessary erosion and adverse impacts to critical habitat and aesthetics and raises questions of fair treatment of neighboring shoreline properties.

The Statutes and Regulations that the Agency is charged to administer strive to protect water quality and the scenic appeal of Adirondack shorelines by establishing structure setbacks, lot widths and cutting restrictions. However boathouses, docks and other structures less than 100 square feet are exempt from the shoreline setback requirements.

The four hearings are scheduled for the following dates and locations:

January 5, 2010, 6:00 p.m.
Adirondack Park Agency
Ray Brook, New York
This hearing will be webcast at the APA website.

January 6, 2010, 6:00 p.m.
Town of Webb Park Ave. Building
183 Park Ave.
Old Forge, New York

January 7, 2010, 11:00 a.m.
Department of Environmental Conservation
625 Broadway, Room 129B
Albany, New York

January 7, 2010, 6:00 p.m.
Lake George Town Hall
Lake George, New York

Written comments will be accepted until January, 17, 2009 and should be submitted to:

John S. Banta, Counsel
NYS Adirondack Park Agency
P.O. Box 99
Ray Brook, New York 12977
Fax (518) 891-3938


Thursday, December 10, 2009

Adirondack Music Scene: Duos, Jazz & Country

We went to barVino in North Creek last night to see Jamie Notarthomas. He plays a mix of originals, Dylan, Beatles, Springsteen and others. He occasionally plays an entire set of Dylan or The Beatles, but last night was the first time I saw him play all original music. Jamie has been writing songs and playing shows for over 20 years. He went chronologically through his albums from first to most recent. We have been seeing him play since 2000 and he is great. Keep your eyes open for him at Zig Zag’s in Lake Placid, on the patio at The Waterhole in the summer, at Slicker’s in Old Forge, or in North Creek, either at barVino or the Music by the River Concert Series. Learn more about Jamie at his website: http://www.jamienotarthomas.com

Thursday, December 10

Power-Duo Sirsy is at Gaffney’s in Saratoga Springs at 10pm.
http://www.sirsy.com/
http://www.gaffneysrestaurant.com/

Melvin Seals & JGB are at the Putnam Den in Saratoga Springs. Show starts at 9pm.
http://www.jgbband.com/
http://www.putnamden.com/

Friday, December 11

Josh Cramoy at Hot Shots in Glens Falls at 9pm.
http://www.joshcramoyband.com/
http://www.myspace.com/clubhotshots

Dreaded Wheat at The Blue Moose (formerly The Trading Post) in Queensbury at 9pm.
http://www.myspace.com/dreadedwheat
http://www.bluewatermanor.com/stone-manor-restaurant.htm

Saturday, December 12

David Allen Coe at Northern Lights in Clifton Park.
http://www.officialdavidallancoe.com/
http://www.northernlightslive.com/

Wednesday, December 16

Tony Jenkins Jazz Trip at barVino in North Creek. No Cover 8-10pm.
http://www.myspace.com/thetonyjenkinsjazztrip
http://www.barvino.net


Saturday, December 5, 2009

Scott Hamilton Returns To Lake Placid With A New Show

Figure skating icon Scott Hamilton is back, ready to thrill audiences with a new skating show, Scott Hamilton’s Holiday Concert on Ice, coming to the Olympic Center in Lake Placid, N.Y. on Tuesday, Dec. 29, at 7:30 p.m.

For more than 20 years, the Olympic Champion and four-time World and U.S. National Champion wowed audiences with his annual Stars on Ice tour, which kicked off annually in Lake Placid. Several of those performers are set to join the skating legend again including Ekaterina Gordeeva and Steven Cousins. The show will also feature Kimmie Meissner, Jozef Sabovcik and Caryn Kadavy, all skating to music performed by a live band and American Idols Phil Stacey and Melinda Doolittle.

Tickets for the Dec. 29 performance of Scott Hamilton’s Holiday Concert on Ice range in price from $90-$30 and are on sale now at the Olympic Center Box Office 518.523-3330 or online at tickets.com or whitefacelakeplacid.com.

About the Skaters: Together with her late partner and husband, Sergei Grinkov, Ekaterina Gordeeva was the 1988 and 1994 Olympic Champion. She also began touring with Stars on Ice in 1991.

Steven Cousins is an eight-time British National Champion; he competed in eight World Figure Skating Championships and three Olympic Winter Games and toured with Stars on Ice until 2007, while Kimmie Meissner won both the 2007 World Championship crown and the 2007 U.S. National Championship title. Ms. Meissner was also the youngest American athlete to compete in the 2006 Torino, Italy Olympic Winter Games.

Jozef Sabovcik claimed the 1984 Olympic bronze medal and won both the 1985 and 1986 European Championship titles, while Caryn Kadavy, a 1988 Olympian, is a three-time U.S. National Championship medalist.

NOTE: THIS POST COMES DIRECTLY FROM AN ORDA PRESS RELEASE



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