Saturday, August 7, 2021

MAKE IT: Blueberry Refrigerator Jam

blueberry jam

I love blueberries. I love blueberry jam. As such, I love to eat blueberry jam on toast (especially sourdough!), drizzled on fruit, as a topping for sorbet, or by the (very large) spoonful. When making any sort of jam, it is important to have a good quality fruit. When the blueberries are amazing, the blueberry jam will also be amazing! This jam will keep for up to three weeks in the refrigerator.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound fresh blueberries
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar OR ½ cup agave nectar or honey
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest (optional)

Directions

  1. Combine blueberries, sugar, lime juice, and lime zest in a medium saucepot. Bring the mixture to boil over medium-high heat, then reduce heat to medium.
  2. Let the jam cook for 15-25 minutes until the blueberries have broken down and the mixture has thickened.
  3. Transfer cooked jam into sterilized glass jars. Let the jam cool uncovered at room temperature. Cover jars and keep jam in refrigerator for up to three weeks. Enjoy!

 


Sunday, August 1, 2021

August Harvest of the Month | Peppers

serrano peppers

Photo of serranos courtesy of https://peppergeek.com/serrano-peppers/

History and Facts

Peppers are the berry-fruits of plants in the genus capsaicin which are in the nightshade family, with tomatoes and eggplants. The spicy “chili peppers” and mild “sweet peppers” and “bell peppers” are all native to tropical parts of the Americas. Prehistoric remains of peppers have been found in Central and South America. 

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Saturday, July 24, 2021

MAKE IT: Pickled beets

pickled beetsMary’s Taste of Fall Pickled Beets

Here is a recipe for pickled beets, courtesy of our amazing SUNY Albany intern.

Savor the fall time flavors with these sweet, warm pickled beets! As someone who wishes it could remain the autumn season all year-round, I am so grateful for these preserved and shelf-stable pickled beets to add to any recipe. Truly delicious on salads, as a side dish, a unique pizza topping or even paired with some goat cheese and crackers for a simple afternoon snack.

 

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Sunday, July 18, 2021

It’s Berry Picking Season!

picking berriesSummertime is the perfect time to go berry picking! Plenty of berries are just coming into season, and many more will soon. Here are a couple posts from our archive covering all things berry-related:

From 2012: A delicious blueberry sorbet recipe!

From 2014: An informational article on wild blackberry season in the Adirondacks.

From 2016: On the color of cranberries

From 2016: Juneberries ripening in July

From 2019: Facts about growing berries in the North Country

From 2020: Northern New York runs grower trials for 3 fruits in an effort to establish new commercial fruit crops

Click here to explore all articles tagged under berries in our archive.

Photo: Blueberry harvest at Wild Work Farm in Keene Valley, NY. Netting over berry bushes protects the crop from birds. Most small-scale diversified farms and orchards pick their harvests by hand. Photo provided by Adirondack Harvest

 


Saturday, July 17, 2021

MAKE IT: Tomato/Tomato Paste Salsa

salsaThis USDA tested and approved recipe is from the University of Georgia Extension. It yields 7-8 pints, and produces a lovely, vinegar-free salsa. This recipe provides a perfect method to use – and preserve – the abundant ripe tomatoes currently (or almost) available at farmers’ markets or even your own gardens! Make sure to use caution when handling chilis and jalapeños, so that you do not inadvertently get the capsaicin oil in your eyes (don’t ask me why I am including that information here!).

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Sunday, July 4, 2021

Berries are the Harvest of the Month for July

picking berriesAll about berries! Blueberries, both wild and cultivated, are native to the Northeast. They belong to the Ericaceae plant family, along with cranberries. They are in season in the Adirondack region from mid-July through September. The United States is the primary producer of blueberries worldwide, followed by Canada, and Peru. In the US they are mostly grown in Oregon, Washington State, Michigan, New Jersey, California, and North Carolina. Many diversified farms and orchards grow blueberries in the Adirondack region. Blueberries like acidic soil and cold winters for a dormancy period.

Above photo: Blueberry harvest at Wild Work Farm in Keene Valley, NY. Netting over berry bushes protects the crop from birds. Most small-scale diversified farms and orchards pick their harvests by hand. 

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Saturday, July 3, 2021

MAKE IT: Campfire Orange Blueberry Muffins

campfire orange blueberry muffins

Muffins cooked in oranges – whomever originally came up with this idea deserves a medal! This versatile recipe can be made with any muffin mix, allowing you to tailor it to your preferences.

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Wednesday, June 30, 2021

Foraging for Wild Food: Workshop series at Paul Smith’s VIC

pigweedI’ve always found the idea of foraging for wild edible plants appealing, but daunting. I know a little about wild plants and foraging, but I lack confidence. And with good reason. I didn’t grow up foraging and, although it’s possible to acquire knowledge about foraging from books and websites, it’s a lot easier (and safer) to learn from someone who has first-hand foraging knowledge and experience; someone who has been gathering, preparing, and eating wild foods throughout his or her entire life.

Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) of Franklin County is offering a series of Wild Edibles Workshops during July and August.

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Thursday, June 24, 2021

Chef Darrell’s Mountain Diner Opens in Blue Mountain Lake

diner
New restaurant hailed as ‘an oasis in a food desert’

Seventy-five years ago Silk City Diner number 59 left the factory in Paterson, New Jersey. The 42-seat restaurant—with a stainless steel and cream enamel exterior, traveled to Conowingo, Maryland,  about 35 miles from Baltimore. There it served customers for decades. From Maryland it was hauled to Pennsylvania, then Ohio, where was partially restored. it landed in Blue Mountain Lake, NY, in 2017, during a blizzard.

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Monday, June 21, 2021

Mobile Farmers Market kicks off 2021 Season

woman shopping inside of mobile market truck

The Mobile Farmers Market has returned for the 2021 season, with community-based stops set across Franklin and Clinton counties.

A program of the Joint Council for Economic Opportunity (JCEO) and the Heart Network, the Mobile Market provides access to fresh fruit and vegetables, baked goods and a salad bar; the market made its debut in 2018 and has since expanded its stops and offerings. The Mobile Market accepts Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits with the additional bonus of the Double Up Food Bucks Program that doubles the amount of produce SNAP recipients can purchase; customers can also use farmers market vouchers.

JCEO and the Heart Network will continue to follow all state and federal COVID-19 guidelines and protocols. Only one person and a JCEO employee are allowed on the bus at a time. Masks are required and customers waiting to enter the bus are asked to maintain social distancing.

The Mobile Market schedule is subject to change. To view the schedule, visit heartnetwork.org/mobile-farmers-market or call (518) 319-4028.

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Sunday, June 13, 2021

June Harvest of the Month | National Dairy Month

dairy cowsJune is National Dairy Month, which originated in 1937 as “National Milk Month” by the National Dairy Council in an effort to encourage consumers to drink more milk during a time of surplus. Today, many organizations and regions continue to observe June as Dairy Month along the same theme. 

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Thursday, June 3, 2021

Farmers markets around the region now open

Another sign that we’re getting back to “normal”: The return of farmers markets. Many have opened around the Adirondack region and Adirondack Harvest has compiled them here.

farmets markets list


Saturday, May 29, 2021

MAKE IT: Wild Spring Greens Salad with Maple Balsamic Dressing

Wild Spring Greens Salad with Maple Balsamic Dressing

One of my favorite things to do in the springtime is to gather young wild greens for my salads. I love eating salads full of dandelion, common evening primrose, red clover, and chicory greens. When harvesting any of these greens, make sure to follow safe and ethical harvesting practices, and wash thoroughly with cold water prior to consuming. Enjoy!

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Saturday, May 15, 2021

MAKE IT: Sweet Roasted Chickpeas

chickpeasThese crispy sweet roasted chickpeas are the perfect choice for your snack craving! Rich in B vitamins and folate, chickpeas also provide a decent amount of iron, fiber, protein, and healthy fatty acids.

If you do not want a sweet snack, you can switch out the sugar and cinnamon for other spice combinations (curry powder, cayenne pepper/chili powder, za’atar, and more!).

These chickpeas can be kept for a day in an airtight container, but do tend to lose their crispiness fairly quickly. However, they are so delicious, that you won’t have to worry about leftovers!

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Saturday, May 8, 2021

Nettles: Not Just for Breakfast Any More

One of my favorite plants is either highly versatile, or confused. On one hand, professional herbivores like deer refuse to touch it, but many people, myself included, gladly eat it every day it’s available. While contacting it is painful, it has been proven to relieve certain chronic pain. It is steeped in over a thousand years of folklore, at one point imbued with the power to cleanse away sin, yet medical science recognizes it as a legitimate remedy for many disorders. Some gardeners consider it a bothersome weed, while others cultivate it.

The stinging nettle, Urtica dioica, is native to Europe, Asia, and northern Africa but has been widespread throughout North America from northern Mexico to northern Canada for centuries. Experts disagree as to the number of species and subspecies worldwide, as nettles freely hybridize.

Nettles sprout little hypodermic needles on stems, leaves, and even flowers. Called trichomes, these glass-like, silica-based needles inject a mixture of irritating chemicals upon contact. The cocktail varies by species, but usually includes histamine, 5-HTP, serotonin, formic acid and acetylcholine.

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