Sunday, April 5, 2020

Fort Ti aims to ‘fortify’ with digital programming

Center of Digital HistoryOn June 26, 1776, John Adams wrote to Abigail words appropriate for our present circumstances:

Our Misfortunes in Canada, are enough to melt a Heart of Stone. The Small Pox is ten times more terrible than Britons, Canadians and Indians together. This was the Cause of our precipitate Retreat from Quebec, this the Cause of our Disgraces at the Cedars.-I dont mean that this was all. There has been Want, approaching to Famine, as well as Pestilence. And these Discouragements seem to have so disheartened our Officers, that none of them seem to Act with Prudence and Firmness.
But these Reverses of Fortune dont discourage me. It was natural to expect them, and We ought to be prepared in our Minds for greater Changes, and more melancholly Scenes still. It is an animating Cause, and brave Spirits are not subdued with Difficulties.”

Beth L Hill,  President & CEO of Fort Ticonderoga, is taking inspiration from this letter.  The Fort is unveiling an online initiative to “Fortify Yourself” through digital educational programs, videos, and social media engagement. As well as access to an extensive virtual vault of rare museum collections. Visit their Center of Digital History to explore.


Friday, April 3, 2020

Self-quarantining and radio contact

radioI’ve been thinking about ways that TB patients combatted loneliness. Spending much of their time alone, often far from family and friends, radio served as a source of entertainment and a lifeline to community. In 1927, a time when there were fewer than 100 radio stations in the United States, Saranac Lake founded its own local radio station, WNBZ. The people at WNBZ produced locally grown radio shows tailored to keep TB patients busy, like courses in literature and history and one called, “Let’s Learn Spanish.”

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Louis Marshall and Forever Wild

Paul Schaefer

Thirty-three years ago, that champion of the Adirondack wilderness, Paul Schaefer, then aged 78, first introduced me to his Adirondack library. Among the first volumes he brought to my attention – because he valued it and had read it repeatedly since he was a younger man – was the transcript of the 1894 New York State Constitutional Convention in Albany – the one that, after weeks of debate, by vote of 122-0 approved the “forever wild” provision protective of the Adirondack and Catskill Forest Preserve.

 

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 28, 2020

From the archive: Searching for the Hudson’s source

Every weekend, we’ll dig into the Almanack archive and revisit some classic features.

lake tear of the cloudsFrom five years ago:
Pete Nelson ponders the true source of the Hudson River

“For generations of hikers Lake Tear has been a special destination, an upward trek to the ultimate source of one of America’s greatest rivers.  But is it?”

And Paul Hetzler gives tips for starting garden plants from seeds.

HOT TOPIC: This story by Phil Brown from three years ago (March 23, 2017) generated 145 comments:
Rail-Trail Advocates Join Adirondack Railroad Lawsuit

JUST FOR FUN: From 10 years ago (March 31, 2010), Alan Wechsler’s “Why I’ll Never Be A Winter 46-er”

 

 


Friday, March 27, 2020

Local history and Lessons in Resilience

cure cottage porchMany years ago, Saranac Lake rallied to fight a deadly disease. Today’s news sure has us thinking about our local history.

Tuberculosis killed 1 in 7 people in the late 1800s. Highly contagious and with no known cure, fear and stigma surrounded TB. Unlike the new virus we face today, many of its victims were young people in their 20s. Like today, quarantine was often seen as an appropriate solution, and sometimes people were isolated against their will. A person’s ethnicity, race, and socioeconomic status affected the kinds of treatments available.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 26, 2020

Almanack Founder John Warren Says Goodbye

My contract to edit Adirondack Almanack, which I founded in 2005, and have edited for the past 15 years, is not being renewed by Adirondack Explorer.

This took me by surprise and comes at a tough time, but the decision was made by Adirondack Explorer’s new publisher, Tracy Ormsbee of Albany. Since 2014 this Almanack has been owned by Getting The Word Out Inc., (dba Adirondack Explorer). » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Jay O’Hern’s New Book Tackles Lumber Cruising

Adirondack Timber Cruising by William J O'HernProlific Adirondack researcher and writer William J. O’Hern’s new book Adirondack Timber Cruising takes the reader on a journey through the development of timber cruising, logging, and forestry and our relationship to forests.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 17, 2020

Historic Preservation Myths: It Cost Too Much

Town of Westport Town Hall courtesy Press-RepublicanThis is the last a four part series. You can find the first part here.

Historic preservation has a set of myths. Some originate from a grain of truth, many are outright wrong, and still others require a more nuanced understanding. We run across these myths all the time in our work and constantly push back against them through education, persuasion, and the wisdom of our own experiences. In this series, we take on the four most persistent and sometimes damaging myths in our field.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 15, 2020

Mt Marcy, Influenza And Our Impulses To Protect Public Land

Whether we seek a wilderness, park, backyard, garden or streetscape, studies show we can expect an emotional, psychological, and physical benefit from regular outdoor activity, interactions with trees or woods, waters and views, however prosaic or sublime. The more we can focus on the natural world around us, the more our powers of awareness grow and the more our minds can grow quiet.

As the First World War slowly ended, another pandemic, influenza, was spreading around the world and killing tens of millions. The impact of losing so many young people so suddenly from that flu, coming on top of so many deaths and injuries resulting from the war itself, must been extremely profound. That time of death, threat and recovery motivated many to get outdoors and to push to acquire more public lands in which to literally “re-create” themselves. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 15, 2020

POSTPONED: Ti Historical Opening

the little fraudsTHIS EVENT IS POSTPONED

The Ticonderoga Historical Society is set to open for their 2020 season on Friday, March 27 with “The Singing of the Green, The Irish in American Musical Theater,” a presentation by Diane O’Connor. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 12, 2020

William Beaumont’s Medical Legacy

William BeaumontIn 1822, a fur trapper named Alexis St. Martin was accidentally gut-shot by a shotgun in Mackinac Island, Michigan. Near death, he was treated by William Beaumont, an Army physician who for much of his career had practiced medicine in Clinton County, New York. What followed was a remarkable chapter in medical history, one that resonates today. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 9, 2020

New Book On 1970s Adirondack Feminist Collective

finding a womans placeForty-six years ago, seven women left behind the lives they knew and created a commune in the Adirondack Mountains which they called “A Woman’s Place.” According to award-winning author Lorraine Duvall, from 1974 to 1982 A Woman’s Place served as a refuge for self-discovery and changed the lives of hundreds of women. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 8, 2020

Historic Preservation Energy Efficiency Myths

historic preservation illustration

Myths pervade most aspects of life and they can be very persistent. Whether it’s “we only use 10% of our brain” or “George Washington had wooden teeth” these myths can be relatively harmless  – or they can really get in the way of true understanding and action.

Historic preservation has its own set of myths. Some originate from a grain of truth, many are outright wrong, and still others require a more nuanced understanding. » Continue Reading.


Friday, March 6, 2020

Port Henry: Hollywood of the East

Main Street Port Henry around 1900 provided by Whallonsburg GrangeThe Whallonsburg Grange Lyceum is set to continue their spring series “Hidden in Plain Sight” with the presentation “Port Henry: Hollywood of the East” on Tuesday, March 10th. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 5, 2020

Historic Preservation Myths: Government Money

Homeowner Hannah Hanford at her home in Saranac Lake provided by AARCH

Myths pervade most aspects of life and they can be very persistent. Whether it’s “we only use 10% of our brain” or “George Washington had wooden teeth” these myths can be relatively harmless  – or they can really get in the way of true understanding and action.

Historic preservation has its own set of myths. Some originate from a grain of truth, many are outright wrong, and still others require a more nuanced understanding. » Continue Reading.