Thursday, July 19, 2018

Fort Ticonderoga Battle Re-Enactment This Weekend

Mt Defiance cannon demonstrationFort Ticonderoga is set to host “Defiance & Independence,” a two-day battle re-enactment on Saturday July 21 and Sunday July 22.

Featuring nearly 500 historical re-enactors, this is the largest battle re-enactment of the year at Fort Ticonderoga. The battle will highlight the events of the summer of 1777, when Fort Ticonderoga’s American garrison was defeated by a British invasion force from Canada. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 18, 2018

John Casilear’s Love Affair with Lake George (Conclusion)

After a stellar 30-year career as a professional engraver of bank notes, artwork, and other items, John Casilear had left the industry to become a fulltime painter, and a very good one — a creator of lovely, detailed landscapes epitomized by artists of the Hudson River School. Even as the popularity of that genre faded and the American art world followed new paths, he was still the frequent recipient of praise and admiration. General assessments of his artistic capabilities were positive, and even glowing.

“There are very few artists belonging to the American school of landscape painters who have achieved such widespread popularity as John W. Casilear…. Mr. Casilear is a great lover of pastoral scenes, and some of his most notable pictures of this character have been drawn from the neighborhood of Lake George, and the Genesee Valley…. His pictures when sent from the easel are as harmonious as a poem, and it is this perfect serenity in their handling which is so attractive to connoisseurs…. He is one of the most popular landscape painters of the day” (The Art Journal, 1876). » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Lake Champlain Bridge Guided Walk July 22

Lake Champlain bridgeA guided walk focusing on the history of the area around the Lake Champlain Bridge has been set for Sunday, July 22, 2018 at 1 pm.

This event is the first of two “Points of Interest” guided bridge walks offered this year by the Chimney Point State Historic Site in Addison, Vermont, and Crown Point State Historic Site in Crown Point, New York. Site administrator Elsa Gilbertson (VT) and Thomas Hughes (NY), historian and president of the Crown Point State Historic Site friends group, lead the tour. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 15, 2018

AARCH to Honor Preservation at Hotel Saranac

hotel saranacAdirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) is set to celebrate preservation successes with a reception at the Hotel Saranac in Saranac Lake on Tuesday, July 17 from 3 to 6 pm.

The event will honor the region’s historic architecture, the power of thoughtful preservation to revitalize communities, and the work of many individuals who have helped used this power to make the Adirondacks a special place to live, work and visit.

Guests will have a chance to meet with VIPs (Very Important Preservationists), architects, builders, and chat with regional authors. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 12, 2018

Farm, Canoe Tours Set For Camp Santanoni’s 125th Anniversary

santanoni main campGreat Camp Santanoni, a National Historic Landmark and New York State Historic Area in Newcomb, is celebrating its 125th anniversary this summer with special events.

This weekend, the Friends of Camp Santanoni will host hourly tours at the historic farm. In August, the Friends are collaborating with Cloudsplitter Outfitters in Newcomb to offer canoe tours on Newcomb Lake.

Santanoni Farm Days, on July 14-15, will focus on the history of the 200-acre gentleman farm that once operated in this remote wilderness setting. Tours will be held at 11, 12, 1, 2, and 3 both days to explore the farm’s buildings and landscapes. No registration is required. The farm area is a one-mile hike from the Gate Lodge off NY-28N. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Adirondack RR President: Implement 1996 Management Plan

adk scenic railroadWhat follows is a statement to the press from the Adirondack Scenic Railroad.

“A Freedom of Information filing by the attorney for a supporter of the Adirondack Scenic Railroad provided the public comments received by the APA in response to their DSEIS amendment to the Remsen-Lake Placid travel corridor,” said Bill Branson, President of the Adirondack Scenic Railroad. “By a significant majority, the response favored Alternative 1, take no action,” he added. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 8, 2018

Ensuring Even Greater Success at Camp Santanoni

Santanoni Main Lodge from Air by Jed ThoneWe appreciate Dave Gibson taking an interest in the future of Camp Santanoni (“Bill Would Wrest Away Santanoni Success”) and there’s much about his piece we agree with.

There are also a few significant errors that should be addressed and, most importantly, we’d like to try to answer the question posed by the recent, proposed Santanoni legislation – why might OPRHP be a better state steward than DEC? » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 6, 2018

Mount Arab Fire Tower Centennial Event

mount arab fire towerFriends of Mount Arab are set to celebrate the 100th birthday of the Mount Arab fire tower on Saturday, August 11th from 9 am to 2 pm.

Friends of Mount Arab board members will be at the trailhead. Steward and board member Tom Cullen will be at the summit observer’s cabin. It is a short jaunt to the summit, 1 mile each way, and the ascent is very family-friendly. The Adirondack Mountain Club recently organized a Trail Steward Workshop on Mount Arab, and all the waterbars are greatly improved. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 5, 2018

John Casilear: Life As An Emerging Artist

Notable American engraver John Casilear took on various projects, including vignettes for book illustrations. In 1839, he worked on the designs for The Token and Atlantic Souvenir, an annual gift book whose contributors at the time included Nathaniel Hawthorne. But in 1840 he embarked on a new adventure, assuming the life of a painter, which began with a trip to Europe to sketch scenery and study the work of the Old Masters.

His companions on the journey were portrait artist Thomas Rossiter and Casilear’s two best friends, John Kensett and Asher Durand. All would one day be identified as artists of the Hudson River School.

They traveled on the world’s largest steamship, the British Queen, and spent much of their time in the countryside on sketching trips, plus viewing the works of European artists at every opportunity. Among the cities they visited were London, Rome, and Paris. Experts later noted the influence of France’s Claude Lorrain as evident in many of Casilear’s landscapes. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 4, 2018

Luzerne: Holocaust Survivor Murray Jaros’s Story

luzerne illustrationHolocaust survivor Murray Jaros is set to give a talk at the Hadley-Luzerne Public Library, 19 Main Street, Lake Luzerne, on Thursday, July 12th at 7 pm.

The talk – “My Story from Nazi Germany to the Solace of Lake Luzerne” – looks at Jaros’s days as a young boy in Nazi Germany, his family’s trials and tribulations, escaping the Nazis, his survival during months of hiding and his eventual journey to Lake Luzerne. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 1, 2018

Azure Mountain’s Fire Tower Centennial

azure mountain The first time I went up Azure Mountain, it was because I’d read about it in a trail guide – it was only a mile hike so I thought it would be pretty easy. The trail started out very gradually, passing a small clearing with an old stone fire place and a picnic table. (I would later learn that’s where the fire observer’s cabin was located.) But after that, the trail became steep. Only a few switchbacks, then practically straight up the mountain – a 900+ foot elevation gain in a pretty short distance. On one stretch there were even a couple of bare poles, leaning at rakish angles, with insulators on the top. (They once held the telephone wire that went up to the fire tower). » Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 30, 2018

John Casilear’s Love Affair with Lake George

Artistry — in terms of painting, drawing, sketching, etc. — escapes me. While I admire and enjoy it, the combination of vision, creativity, and especially ability seems foreign, even though I lived with it while growing up. Through learning to read and constantly employing skills in that area, I gradually developed a certain comfort in the world of words, but none of it came to me magically, which is how I viewed the artistic capabilities of two of my siblings: without any lessons or instructions, they could just do it. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 27, 2018

At Eagle’s Nest: Ned Buntline In The Adirondacks

ned buntline

Stocky red-bearded Ned Buntline, the unruly dime novelist, and Buffalo Bill’s promoter was born Edward Zane Carroll Judson in 1823. He left home at thirteen and took to the high seas, and at fifteen he had already worked as a cabin boy on a freighter bound for the Caribbean, become a midshipman, and published his first story. He chose the pen name Buntline as a reminder of his sailing days (a buntline was a rope at the bottom of a square sail).

When his maritime career ended, he spent the next two years, by his own embellished accounts, killing buffaloes and grizzlies and roaming the western plains for the Northwest Fur Company. In 1844 while writing for a New York “flash” newspaper, the Knickerbocker, he started his own magazine, Ned Buntline’s Own. It was mixture of adventure stories and scandalous gossip in the flash press style. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Chazy Summer Fair to Mark World War One Centennial

alice t miner museumAlice T. Miner Museum and the William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute will hold a Centennial Summer Fair, Saturday, July 14th at Miner Institute in Chazy, from 1 to 4 pm.

This event will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I and will also serve as a fundraiser for the United Way of the Adirondack Region.

The Fair will give visitors the opportunity to learn about the significance of World War I and enjoy period-themed entertainment and refreshments. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 24, 2018

Blue Mountain Lake: Chauncey Hathorn and Bennett Brothers

arctic houseOn a cool autumn evening in 1874, 19-year-old Edward Bennett stood in line holding his two-dollar ticket and waited to board the night boat to Albany. If all went as scheduled, he would arrive by morning just in time to catch the train to Saratoga. There the newly opened Adirondack railroad would take him to the last stop on the line, North Creek, one of the gateways to the Adirondacks. Those who would come to know him as a robust mature adult would not have recognized this skinny, pale Irish farmhand.

And anyone inquiring as to his destination must have smiled when he told them that he was headed for a remote lake in Hamilton County, one of the least populated sections of the woods. The entire county had less than 3,000 souls living on 1,721 square miles, that’s well over a million acres of forest land. The winters were as brutal as they were long; four months, and temperatures as low as -40. » Continue Reading.



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