Sunday, February 3, 2019

Adirondack History Museum Seeking 46er Summit Canisters

46er Summit Canisters The Adirondack History Museum is starting a campaign to gather as many Adirondack 46er summit canisters as possible to incorporate in their Hiking the Adirondack High Peaks exhibit.

The Museum currently has four canisters, from Seward, Marshall, Santanoni, and Esther. Their goal is to be the repository for the entire collection, to be permanently displayed at the Adirondack History Museum. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 2, 2019

Nonpareil Athlete Babe Didrikson’s North Country Visit

During the first half of the 20th century, traveling basketball and baseball teams were part of America’s social fabric, providing great entertainment for millions of appreciative fans. Mostly visiting cities and surrounding communities, the famous and near-famous made the rounds each year. Their competition consisted of locally organized squads that often recruited one or more talented college or semi-pro players.

In New York, the most popular routes for traveling teams were from New York City north to Albany, and west to Buffalo. It was uncommon to find nationally known stars straying from those paths to visit the state’s northernmost regions, but in 1934 — 85 years ago this week — Plattsburgh and other lucky sites played host to sports royalty in the person of Mildred “Babe” Didrikson. At the very least, she was the equal of most men in several sports. Invariably, she is listed among the greatest female athletes of the 20th century. Compilations, like this one by Sports Illustrated, usually place her at the top among athletes who specialized in single disciplines, but when it comes to all-round talents and achievements, there are few if any challengers to Didrikson. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Ticonderoga Historical To Conserve Battlefields Mural

clegg muralThe Ticonderoga Historical Society has received a grant of $7,500 for the conservation of a mural depicting the significant historic battlefields from Plattsburgh to Saratoga.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Fort William Henry Corp Under New Leadership

Fort William Henry Hotel The Board of Directors of Fort William Henry Corporation has announced the election of Kathryn Flacke Muncil, Sebastian J. Luciano, and Nancy Flacke Reuss to a new executive leadership team.

The first Fort William Henry Hotel opened in 1855. The resort, one of the oldest and largest on Lake George, now includes the Fort William Henry Hotel and Conference Center, the Best Western Hotel at Exit 21 and the recreated Fort William Henry, site of a pivotal 1757 French and Indian War battle.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 26, 2019

That So-Called Adirondack Hall of Fame

I’ve made it a point of personal honor not to engage in arguments over lists, a lesson learned in high school when the radio stations would play their obligatory end-of-year “100 Greatest Rock and Roll Songs of All Time” segments.

And you’d sit around with a bunch of people in your friend’s basement having a meltdown that Stairway to Heaven placed ahead of Satisfaction.

The capper was when stations, looking to reintroduce some buzz into a growingly tired feature, would pick something like Rubberband Man by the Spinners as the No. 1 Rock and Roll Song of All Time, spurring a renewed burst of moral outrage that even weed couldn’t suppress. The Internet has made things far worse, as morons in search of clicks have ranked stuff like the Top 10 Grasshoppers and the 10 Best Places For Retirees to Buy Housing Shingles. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 23, 2019

John W. Taylor: New York’s (Almost Only) Speaker of the House

The title Speaker of the House of Representatives has received lots of attention during the past few years. It’s hard to believe that the nation’s fourth-most-populous state (New York—nearly always number one, and in the top five since 1790) has only one native who served in that position.

Well, technically, there are two, but one of them served 99.82 percent of the pair’s total time in office—to be explained later. If you’re from Northern New York and dislike the idea of people owning people, you’ll be pleased at his strong stance for freedom during one of our nation’s most turbulent times. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 20, 2019

When The 1918 Influenza Pandemic Reached Keene

influenza articleLocal historian and author Margaret Bartley is set to give a talk on the impact the 1918 Influenza Pandemic had in the Town of Keene at the Keene Valley Library.

Bartley has collected individual stories and photos that help convey the impact the public health crisis had on the relatively isolated community. She will detail the devastating flu’s impact on Keene and the surrounding Adirondack region. Bartley estimates 90% of the hamlet’s population was infected. At one point in 1919, there were so many deaths town officials struggled to bury the bodies. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 19, 2019

Murder in Troy: The Welshman And William Wesson (Conclusion)

What follows is the conclusion of the murder story that was begun here last week, ending with testimony from several witnesses, including the defendant. This picks up in the trial’s final phase.

During closing statements, defense attorney Jeremiah K. Long pleaded for his client’s life: “The charge of murder in the first degree is a fearful one. To condemn this aged man to death will be a fearful responsibility for every individual juror. The facts did not warrant a conclusion of deliberate killing. The ends of justice might be satisfied by the infliction of a lighter penalty than death…. None of the circumstances showed that the crime was premeditated. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, January 17, 2019

MLK’s Poor People’s Campaign Revival in Saranac Lake

A celebration of the life of Martin Luther King has been set for Saturday, January 19, 2019 from 7 to 8 pm at the First Presbyterian Church Great Hall, 57 Church Street in Saranac Lake.

After listening to Dr. King’s words on the need for social and economic justice, Joe Paparone will speak on the revival of Dr. King’s last project, the Poor People’s Campaign, and discuss continuing this legacy today. There will be music and refreshments. » Continue Reading.


Friday, January 11, 2019

Museum’s Cabin Fever Sunday Talks Begins with Tahawus

Adirondac in 1994 Adirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake (ADKX) has announced their 2019 Cabin Fever Sunday Series, featuring seven events that look deeper into Adirondack history and culture.

The first event, Tahawus: Birth of a Hamlet and a Club, is set for January 13, at 1:30 pm. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Murder in Troy: Thomas Jones Kills William Wesson

On the evening of June 27, 1892, in a St. John’s Street boarding house in South Troy, New York, 66-year-old Thomas Jones was nearing the end of a three-day bender. He was fond of drawing a .32-caliber pistol and showing it off, something Jones had done repeatedly that day, much to the alarm of others. He hadn’t been on the job for several days at the Burden iron works, and had argued repeatedly with a coworker and co-resident of the boarding house, 22-year-old William Wesson, even offering to fight him in a duel. It was dismissed as nothing more than the ramblings of an old, annoying drunk. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Horse Artifacts Focus of Fort Ti Program Sunday

fort ticonderogaFort Ticonderoga’s wintertime Fort Fever Series returns in 2019 and features programs led by Fort Ticonderoga museum staff who will share their latest research and discoveries.

The first program, presented on January 13, 2019, is  “Half-Spanish, Part-Hungarian, & All-American: Cavalry Treatises, Saddles & Objects in Fort Ticonderoga’s Collection.” Join Vice President of Public History Stuart Lilie to explore the horse artifacts in Fort Ticonderoga’s collections and the unique stories of American saddlery that they tell. The Collections of Fort Ticonderoga include saddles, documents and other pieces which record the ongoing evolution of American military saddlery beyond the long 18th century. » Continue Reading.


Monday, January 7, 2019

Great Camp Santanoni Winter Weekends

Camp Santanoni Historic AreaThree Winter Weekend events will be held for the sixth consecutive year at Camp Santanoni in Newcomb.

The events will take place during the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend, January 19-21; Presidents Day holiday weekend, February 16-18; and the weekend of March 16-17.

These Winter Weekends have grown in popularity in recent years as cross-country skiers and snowshoers access the historic great camp property to rest, tour the buildings, and view interpretative displays. » Continue Reading.


Monday, January 7, 2019

Historic Preservation Grants Available

Genesee Country Village and MuseumPreserve New York grant applications are now open.

Launched in 1993 through a partnership between The Preservation League of New York State and the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA), Preserve New York makes grants for historic structure reports, building condition reports, cultural landscape reports, and cultural resource surveys. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 2, 2019

Community Xmas Trees: Historically Rooted in the Adirondacks

Community Christmas trees are an American tradition that bring people together regardless of income, faith, political persuasion, or pretty much anything that divides us. Whether sponsored by a city, town, church, or civic organization, community trees are placed in an outdoor public setting for anyone to enjoy.

It’s a rare treat to share something so nonpartisan: whatever you might personally like about the holidays is what you’ll take away from viewing the tree or sharing in song and merrymaking with fellow citizens. And it’s nice to know that America’s first community Christmas tree, the one that spawned a movement still going strong more than a century later, was an Adirondack balsam. » Continue Reading.