Monday, August 8, 2016

View’s House Tour by Boat Casts Off Saturday

great campView’s House Tour by Boat offers an opportunity to tour the interiors of some of the most fascinating camps on the Fulton Chain. Twenty party barges will depart at 10 am on Saturday, August 13, from the Old Forge lakefront to give passengers an opportunity to tour the grounds and interiors of camps that boaters usually only view from the water.

This year’s tour will include visits to six camps along the Fulton Chain. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, August 6, 2016

Irish Fenians In The North Country

fenian meetingToday we would label them a “paramilitary organization.” In the years immediately following the American Civil War, life in the Adirondacks was briefly interrupted by the Fenians, also known as the Fenian Brotherhood.

The Fenian Brotherhood was an Irish Republican organization founded in New York in 1858 by John O’Mahoney. Their name is derived from legends about ancient Irish warriors called the Fianna.

Their goal was an Irish Republic free of British rule. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 4, 2016

Erastus Hudson and the Lindbergh Baby Case (Conclusion)

3A EMHudsonClothFrom a forensics perspective, Dr. Erastus Hudson voiced his deduction that the Lindbergh kidnapping was an inside job, based on evidence with which he was personally familiar. “A point of great importance rested in the absence of any fingerprints on the nursery window and its remarkably broad sill. Kelly [of the New Jersey State Police] had powdered it a few hours after the kidnapping. No prints were found, although Betty Gow [the child’s nurse] and Mrs. Lindbergh had opened and closed the window that same night. Miss Gow had rubbed the child’s chest with an ointment, the oleaginous base of which would have augmented the secretion of the finger ridges in leaving clear prints.

“Of course, there would have been older prints as well. The reason Kelly failed to get all these prints was because they must have been washed off. Someone with a pail of water and cloth undoubtedly bathed those spots where fingerprints must have been left. They did so between the time Betty Gow put the baby to bed and about four hours later, when Kelly began investigating. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 1, 2016

Adirondack Museum Planning $9.4M Overhaul

adirondack museum updatesThe board of trustees of the Adirondack Museum has announced the launch of the public phase of its $9.4 million capital campaign “For Generations,” which is hoped to raise funds to update its exhibitions, expand opportunities for visitors to explore the museum’s natural surroundings, enhance universal access, and other improvements.

More than $7.5 million has been raised in donations and pledges to date. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 28, 2016

Erastus Hudson and the Lindbergh Baby Case (Part 2)

2A LadderLindberghHouseOn March 13, 1932 Erastus Hudson of Plattsburgh was asked to visit the crime scene in the Charles Lindbergh home to secure whatever evidence he might produce. First using the standard dusting process, which was best for solid surfaces, he found no prints in the nursery on any items that had already been checked, confirming Kelly’s results, but he did find thirteen on the baby’s books and toys. These were extremely valuable because the baby had been born at home, and thus no fingerprints had been taken. Those gathered by Hudson were the only means of identifying the baby for certain—if he were ever found.

Turning his attention to the ladder that had yielded no prints to police experts, Hudson spent a couple of days applying his innovative process. He estimated collecting “more than 500 fingerprints and fragments, some of which were sufficient to be of value.” » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 28, 2016

History Tour Across Lake Champlain Bridge July 31

crown point 1930On July 31, 2016, at 1 pm, a guided history walk across the Lake Champlain Bridge will be held. Attendees will meet at the Crown Point State Historic Site museum nestled between two colonial forts on the New York side of the bridge for the start of the tour. Allow at least two hours for this walk back and forth across the bridge.

Participants can learn about nearly 9,000 years of human history at this important and beautiful location on Lake Champlain. The channel with its peninsulas, or points, on each side made it one of the most strategic spots on Lake Champlain for the Native Americans for millennia, and for the French, British, and early Americans in the 17th and 18th centuries. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Fire Tower Family Day At Essex Museum Saturday

adk fire towerThe Adirondack History Museum will present its Adirondack Fire Tower program for families on Saturday, July 30 from 9 am – 3 pm.

The program features a presentation by museum educator David Thomas-Train at the museum building, and will include a hike up Poke-O- Moonshine.

The free program for families explores the history and ongoing role of fire towers in regional land stewardship. Participants should bring a bagged lunch, and be prepared to hike the mountain. The program is recommended for students in the fourth to eighth grade level. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 22, 2016

Bluff Point Lighthouse Restoration Celebration Sunday

Roger Harwood, Bluff Point Lighthouse Committee Chair.In honor of the newly renovated Bluff Point Lighthouse on Valcour Island, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) in conjunction with the Clinton County Historical Association (CCHA) has announced a formal Bluff Point Lighthouse Restoration Celebration to be held this Sunday, July 24th at the Peru Dock Boat Launch. 

The schedule of events begins at the Peru Dock Boat Launch at 11 am featuring guest speakers from the NYS DEC and the CCHA, in addition to state and local elected officials. Transportation to and from Valcour Island will be provided by the NYS DEC starting at 1 pm. with free tours at the Lighthouse provided by volunteers from the Clinton County Historical Association from 1 to 5 pm. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 21, 2016

Plattsburgh’s Erastus Hudson and the Lindbergh Baby Case

1A EMHudson“Trial of the Century” is a term frequently bandied about in the media to define extremely high-profile court cases. In the 1900s, twenty or so sported the moniker—the Scopes Monkey Trial, Nuremburg, Charles Manson, and O. J. Simpson among them—but always in the running, and at the top of many lists, is the Lindbergh Kidnapping in 1935. (The crime was committed in 1932; the court case began three years later.) At the center of one of the main issues during that trial was a North Country man, whose testimony spawned doubt among observers that justice was achieved. Many books have been written about the case during the ensuing 81 years, addressing the controversy as to whether the final verdict was justice or a travesty thereof.

That North Country man was Erastus Mead Hudson, born into a prominent Plattsburgh family in March 1888. (Hudson Hall at Plattsburgh State University is named after Erastus’s father, George Henry Hudson.) He attended Plattsburgh High School, and after graduating from Harvard in 1913 with a bachelor of science degree, Erastus attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City, graduating in 1917 with specialties in bacteriology and body chemistry. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 14, 2016

Equal Pay for Women in 1870: The Charley Warner Solution

1928 HdlineCWarner01Unequal pay for women ably performing the same jobs as men is unfair and idiotic. Why the sex of an employee reduces their pay should be a mystery to all, especially when most men can relate stories of male co-workers receiving equal pay despite being underperformers, shirkers, or just plain lazy. But the issue is nothing new. Faced with a need for self-supporting income in the 1870s, a northern New York woman didn’t wait for society to grant her equality. She instead chose her own path: going undercover in a man’s world. In doing so, she may have also found more happiness than anyone realized at the time. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Ticonderoga’s Hancock House Celebrating 90 Years

hot box honeyThe Ticonderoga Historical Society will celebrate the 90th birthday of the Hancock House, its architecturally significant headquarters building, on Saturday July 16th. The gala “Roaring Twenties” evening, will be complete with flapper dresses and hot jazz.

Burlington-based Hot Box Honey headlined the Hancock House’s 2015 USO Show. Led by jazz vocalist Jane Evans and guitarist Gregory Evans, Hot Box Honey is an eight-piece band with horns, multi-vocalists, guitar, double bass, piano and drums. They will showcase an upbeat mix of swing, Latin, and jazz standards from the 1920s era. Also entertaining during the picnic supper portion of the evening will be the Saratoga Springs barbershop quartet The Elderly Brothers. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 10, 2016

Irish Military Encampment And Concert Saturday

hair of the dog bandMilitary living historians and authors will cover the grounds of the Hancock House in Ticonderoga on Saturday, August 13 for a day-long event celebrating Irish history. The evening will feature a concert by “Hair of the Dog,” the well-known Celtic band with a large fan base across the United States and Europe. Opening for the band is the popular local trio “Loose Monkeys.”

The afternoon will also include several brief programs highlighting the Irish in the American Civil War and How the Adirondacks worked for Irish Freedom. William L. McKone, author of Vermont’s Irish Rebel – Captain John Lonergan and President of the Fenian Historical Society, will present a program on the Fenians. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Around The Campfire With Old Mountain Phelps

Orsen PhelpsOrson Schofield “Old Mountain” Phelps (1816-1905) was the archetypical Adirondack guide.

Guide historian Chuck Brumley attributed this to the wide literary attention Phelps received from early city visitors to the High Peaks, including Verplanck Colvin and Charles Dudley Warner. Phelps was painted by Winslow Homer. He became a stock character in the guidebooks of E.R. Wallace and S.R. Stoddard.

Phelps certainly had the requisite outdoor skills to be a well-known Adirondack guide, and he cut many High Peaks trails still in use, as well as naming a number of high peaks. But it was his personality and aphorisms that caught the imagination of many of the “city men” he guided. He amused and impressed his clients with rustic humor and philosophy.

It is this aspect of Phelps that is apparent in a previously unknown collection of papers recently acquired by the Adirondack Research Library of the Kelly Adirondack Center of Union College. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Why We Celebrate the Fourth the Way We Do

1876 ODJ4thJulyFRFourth of July celebrations across the Adirondacks and foothills are rooted in regional and national traditions. The principal components — parades, social gatherings, feasts, and fireworks — have endured since the early 1800s. They’re actually based on suggestions by one of our Founding Fathers.

During the first century of the nation’s existence, memories of the revolution remained strong, spawning several customs that have since disappeared. Besides parades, food, and fireworks, it was common during that time to skewer King George in a variety of ways. Some towns presented plays with characters from the revolution, generating boos and hisses when the king’s character appeared on stage. All events of those days featured speeches that were widely anticipated, including at least one mocking King George for his treatment of the colonies. Another highlight in every city, town, and village celebration was a reading of the Declaration of Independence.

Each July, newspapers recounted the festivities held in communities large and small, from Albany and Troy to Plattsburgh, Ogdensburg, Watertown, and scores of small villages. Reading of the Declaration of Independence at each location was a revered tradition and truly the heart of every celebration. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 3, 2016

Saranac Laboratory Museum Free Admission Days for Residents

Petrova Elementary 4th graders on a recent field trip to the Saranac Laboratory MuseumHistoric Saranac Lake has announced a monthly free admission day for residents of the Saranac Lake School District. On the last Saturday of every month, through September, the Saranac Laboratory Museum will be free of charge for all local residents. Admission to the Museum is normally $5 for adults, and children are always free of charge. Admission is also free for Members of Historic Saranac Lake. » Continue Reading.