Monday, March 26, 2018

The Jessup Brothers in the American Revolution

Jessup Patent MapIn the mid-1760s, brothers Edward and Ebenezer Jessup moved from Dutchess County, NY, to Albany and engaged in land speculation in the Hudson River Valley and Lake George area.

The Jessups would become friendly with Sir William Johnson, who had built Fort William Henry in 1755.  Thanks to his close relationship with the Mohawk, Johnson became the Superintendent of Indian Affairs. The Jessups acquired much of their land from Johnson and the Mohawks. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 26, 2018

Selma Film To Mark MLK 50 Event in Saranac Lake

selma filmIn commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the murder of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., a showing of the film Selma has been set for Thursday, April 19th, from 6:30 to 9 pm, in the Cantwell Room of the Saranac Lake Free Library. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 25, 2018

Adirondacks and the Making of the Wild West

buffalo bill's best shotAmong the exhibitions worth visiting in our area this summer is one I’m especially interested in seeing: the Shelburne Museum’s “Playing Cowboy: America’s Wild West Shows,” an exploration of the manifold ways in which William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody and other Wild West characters influenced American popular culture well into the 20th century.

And not because I’m particularly or even remotely interested in the American west, wild or otherwise.

Rather, it’s because of the story’s links to the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 22, 2018

Glens Falls Water System Museum Talk Tuesday

Workers building forms for the Halfway Brook Reservoir dam, 1936. A talk on the Glens Falls Water System – Then & Now, has been set for Tuesday, March 27th at 7 pm at the Chapman Museum, 348 Glen Street, Glens Falls.

Chapman Museum Director, Tim Weidner will present the history of the development of Glens Falls’ water system from the 1860s, when a variety of ideas were floated to meet the growing community’s water needs, through 1936 when Halfway Brook Reservoir was constructed. To bring the story up to the present, City Engineer, Steve Gurzler will provide information about the current system, including the filtration plant in Cole’s Woods. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 21, 2018

The Adirondack Uranium Rush (Conclusion)

The failure of Adirondack Uranium and Mineral Corporation in early 1957 dominated the news cycle, but there was still activity in a half-dozen Lewis County sites where prospectors were searching for uranium.

In May of that year, there was also related news on the eastern edge of the Adirondacks. After an aerial survey detected radioactivity along Route 22 between Ticonderoga and Whitehall, a mining company obtained options to explore the farms of John DeLorme and Earl Shattuck to verify the readings and determine if suitable quantities of ore were present. They weren’t. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 15, 2018

Adirondack Regiment Focus Of Ogdensburg Round Table

118th NY Volunteer InfantryPete Gilbert Jr. is set to lead a round table discussion on the 118th New York Volunteer Infantry, on Sunday, March 25th at 2 pm at the Ogdensburg Public Library.

The 118th New York Volunteer Infantry, or “Adirondack Regiment,” was formed with enlistees from Clinton, Essex, and Warren counties in 1862, and eventually took part in the Peninsula Campaign, the Bermuda Hundred Campaign, and the battles of Cold Harbor, Petersburg, the Crater, and Richmond. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 15, 2018

Queensbury Women’s History Event March 21st

Warren County Historical SocietyA local Women’s History event is set for Wednesday, March 21st at 7 pm, at the Warren County Historical Society, 50 Gurney Lane, in Queensbury.

This Women’s History Month event, which is free and open to the public, features talks by three local women on three notable women in local history Harriet Leonard Colburn, Jeanne Robert Foster, and Frances Garnar Kinnear. Light refreshments will be served following the presentation. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Profiles Of Old Time Adirondack Fulton Chain Guides

In the past year or so, the Inlet Historical Society received donations of artifacts and materials originating from the collections of Inlet residents.

One unique item is the following unidentified newspaper clipping about some notable Fulton Chain guides:

Within a few hundred miles of a complex civilization is found the last vestiges of a fast disappearing frontier. Now high-speed, hard-surfaced roadways carry motorists to within a few miles of the heart of what is still the Empire state wilderness, the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Adirondack Uranium: A Lewis County Boondoggle

In late summer 1955, after two months of surveying and studying uranium deposits in Saratoga County, Robert Zullo and his partners, George McDonnell and Lewis Lavery, saw their claims publicly dismissed in print by a business rival, who told the Leader-Herald there were “no major deposits of uranium in the Sacandaga region.” Geologist John Bird of Schenectady had been hired by a Wyoming uranium-mining company to survey the area, and after thirty days, he had found uraninite only in “ridiculously small” quantities. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 8, 2018

St Lawrence Co Klan History Talk March 15th

A KKK cross-burningAuthor and historian Bryan Thompson will speak on a chapter of the Ku Klux Klan that was active in St. Lawrence County in the 1920s at the next Brown Bag Lunch Series at the St. Lawrence County Historical Association in Canton, NY, on Thursday, March 15th at noon.

Local KKK members held rallies and cross burnings in many towns and hamlets in St. Lawrence County, where they targeted communities of African-Americans, Jews, and Catholics. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 7, 2018

The Adirondack Uranium Rush (Part 3)

Under the newly formed Mohawk Mining Company (MMC), the trio of George McDonnell, Lewis Lavery, and Robert Zullo had high hopes of successfully developing uranium deposits they discovered near Batchellerville in Saratoga County. Plans were made for radiometric surveys of the sites, and they began pumping water from two feldspar quarries to examine the deeper rock for additional specimens. Tests were also planned on old piles of mine tailings that caused Geiger counters to react. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Adirondack Rush of ’49: Searching For Uranium

After the big news of a possible uranium ore bed near Plattsburgh failed to pan out in early 1949, the search for ore continued locally and nationally.

Many magazines, including Life (“The Uranium Rush”) and Popular Mechanics (“The ’49 Uranium Rush”) featured stories on the phenomenon that was sweeping the country. The coincidence of timing — the 100th anniversary of the 1849 California gold rush — made for enticing newspaper headlines as well. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, February 25, 2018

Resistance: Ron Stafford’s Gift to Local Governments

Senator Ron Stafford with a former Town of Bolton Supervisor, Frank Leonbruno, in Bolton Landing, July 2001Having spent more than a decade as an aide to an upstate New York senator, the late Ron Stafford, I retain some residual habits, one of which is flipping through the Governor’s budget proposals as soon as they’re released, alert, I would hope, to anything that might have an impact on our region, positive or negative.

That’s how I happened to become aware of a proposal in this year’s budget to remove Forest Preserve lands from the real property tax standard and authorize New York State to send Adirondack communities “payments in lieu of taxes.”

I gave it more than a cursory glance because in 1989, when I worked for Senator Stafford, the current governor’s father, Mario Cuomo, proposed something very similar. » Continue Reading.


Friday, February 23, 2018

Sarah Pell’s Struggle for History, Human Rights

Mrs. Pell, President Taft, A. C. Bossom” July 6, 1909.Fort Ticonderoga’s “Fort Fever Series” continues on Sunday, March 11, at 2 pm with a program on “A ‘Charmingly Aggressive Woman’: Sarah Pell’s Struggle for History & Human Rights” presented by Miranda Peters, Fort Ticonderoga’s Director of Collections.

This program will explore images, archival materials, and collections never before seen by the public, and recently cataloged by museum staff that reveal glimpses of Sarah Pell’s life and work. This program is part of the National Women’s History Month celebration. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, February 21, 2018

An Adirondack Uranium Rush

It’s hard not to think the above title is ridiculous. Believable possibilities would be iron, feldspar, talc, or garnet. But uranium? And on top of that, a rush? With the excitement of hopeful lottery players, folks in the past have swarmed the mountains and lowlands at word of supposed gold discoveries, or silver, or other metals, all of them precious in terms of financial value to the finder. But rushing to find radioactive materials — the stronger the better — in the Adirondacks? Really?

For the first four decades of the twentieth century, large mines at a few locations worldwide provided the bulk of uranium used in America. Discoveries of ore in Quebec and Ontario in the early 1900s caused speculation that deposits existed in the Adirondacks as well due to a shared geological history. In 1914, George Chadwick, professor of geology and mineralogy at St. Lawrence University, opined that “there’s no special reason” why radium-bearing rocks wouldn’t exist in the local mountains. Perhaps none had been found, he said, because no one had looked for them. » Continue Reading.



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