Saturday, March 2, 2019

New Edition of Hiking History Tome ‘Forest and Crag’ Published

forest and crag Thirty years after its initial publication, Forest and Crag: A History of Hiking, Trail Blazing, and Adventure in the Northeast Mountains has been republished in an anniversary edition (SUNY Press, 2019).

Laura and Guy Waterman’s book is a history of the love affair with the mountains of the northern forests from the Catskills and the Adirondacks of New York to the Green Mountains of Vermont, the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and the mountains of Maine. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Jackie Archer: A North Country Inspiration (Part 3)

Jackie Archer In early 1967, Jackie Archer, president of Plattsburgh’s NAACP chapter, twice addressed the Beekmantown PTA, once on the subject of teen drinking, and later about the importance of maintaining mental health.

When Black Power stories filled the media, she gave interviews to the press, explaining that whites needn’t fear violence. “They think Negroes want to take over, but they only want the rights that have been promised them.” she was quoted saying. “Some laws have helped the status of the Negro… but are only a scratch on the surface. If the men in Newark or Detroit had jobs they would not be rioting.” » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Warren Co Historical Society Names Leadership

Warren County Historical Society

The Warren County Historical Society (WCHS) offers historical programs, a Resource Center, a Book and Gift Shop, historical and genealogical research, archives and collections, the quarterly newsletter Pastimes, museum displays, and historic preservation advocacy.

The Society is headquartered at 50 Gurney Lane, in Queensbury where a new, permanent exhibit, “Warren County 360: Celebrating Place and People,” is planned for Summer 2019. The Society has a membership of 175 and is funded by memberships, donations, grants, and fundraisers. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 23, 2019

Jackie Archer: North Country Civil Rights Leader (1964)

Jackie ArcherIn 1964, Jackie Archer had several irons in the fire. She was a member of the Beekmantown PTA and was very active in several religious capacities as secretary of the Board of Christian Education of the First Baptist Church; a member of the church’s Guild and Missionary Society; a substitute Sunday school teacher; and, in June, she became Recording Secretary for the Clinton County Council of Churches.

Much of her time, however, was devoted ongoing issues of concerned to the local branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and its leader Paul Lewis: job and housing discrimination. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, February 20, 2019

My First Trout and The Rainmakers

My advice to nine-year-old wanna-be trout anglers is: “Do not wear a sweater.” Repeat: “Do not wear a sweater.”

My earliest trout fishing days in and around Bakers Mills in today’s Siamese Ponds Wilderness Area were frustrating because my own fishhook invariably caught mainly my sweater. And we mostly used night crawlers not artificial flies then. Better to wear something less adept at snagging stray hooks. Try thick vinyl, maybe. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, February 17, 2019

Whallonsburg Grange Purchases 1950s Whitcomb’s Garage

Whitcombs Garage in WhallonsburgThe Whallonsburg Grange Hall, has announce that it has purchased Whitcomb’s Garage in Whallonsburg, the vacant building and land directly across Whallons Bay Road from the Grange.

The 1950s-era garage, on a 1.5-acre lot along the Boquet River, was owned by Clarence “Narni” Whitcomb.   Whitcomb was a lifelong resident of Whallonsburg who sold and serviced cars there until the 1990s; he died in 2017.  » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 16, 2019

Jackie Archer: A North Country Civil Rights Inspiration

Jackie ArcherDr. Martin Luther King Jr. inspired a national movement and remains a catalyst for peaceful change after he was martyred for the cause. He was hardly beloved by all: many felt threatened by him, and when he protested against the war in Vietnam, many criticized him for losing focus and supposedly deserting the primary goal of addressing racial inequality.

Millions supported his efforts, but it was a chaotic time, filled with uncertainty about the future. With the bitterness, hatred, and violence that was revealed, even on the nightly TV news, it sometimes seemed doubtful that true change could ever be achieved.

But Dr. King wasn’t alone as a leader. Others took up the mantle at all levels of society, and when someone did in Clinton County, I found renewed hope that substantive change could be achieved. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, February 14, 2019

Event Highlights Ticonderoga on the Eve of Revolution

Fort Ticonderoga British GarrisonFort Ticonderoga is set to host a living history event Saturday, February 16, 2019 about British garrison life in February 1775, three months before Ticonderoga was pulled into the American War of Independence.

Living history programs feature the weapons, trades, and home life of soldiers and families during peacetime at Ticonderoga. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 9, 2019

Lorraine Duvall: Why We Seek Wilderness

letters to a spiritual seekerIn March 1848 a colleague of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Harrison Gray Otis Blake, sought out Henry David Thoreau to help him on his spiritual pilgrimage, recognizing Thoreau’s need to live a “fresh, simple life with God.”

Thoreau wanted to live his life free from the trappings of the commercial world, enabling him to enrich his inner life. He escaped to his Walden Pond to experience “nature as goodness crystalized.” » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Disappointing Personal Lessons in Racism

The arrival of Black History Month (also known as African American History Month in the US) is a time to discuss and celebrate the achievements and lives of many brave souls who came before us. On a personal level, my thoughts turn to a dichotomy of experiences: pride that historically, New Yorkers in general have stood on the side of civil rights and equality for all, but dismay at several personal recollections when racism unexpectedly reared its head right before my eyes. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Adirondack World of Edna West Teall at ADKX

Adirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake (ADKX) annual winter Cabin Fever Sunday Series is underway, featuring seven events that look deeper into Adirondack history and culture.

The next event, The Adirondack World of Edna West Teall with Laura Rice and Elizabeth Folwell, is set for February 10th, at 1:30 pm. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, February 3, 2019

Adirondack History Museum Seeking 46er Summit Canisters

46er Summit Canisters The Adirondack History Museum is starting a campaign to gather as many Adirondack 46er summit canisters as possible to incorporate in their Hiking the Adirondack High Peaks exhibit.

The Museum currently has four canisters, from Seward, Marshall, Santanoni, and Esther. Their goal is to be the repository for the entire collection, to be permanently displayed at the Adirondack History Museum. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 2, 2019

Nonpareil Athlete Babe Didrikson’s North Country Visit

During the first half of the 20th century, traveling basketball and baseball teams were part of America’s social fabric, providing great entertainment for millions of appreciative fans. Mostly visiting cities and surrounding communities, the famous and near-famous made the rounds each year. Their competition consisted of locally organized squads that often recruited one or more talented college or semi-pro players.

In New York, the most popular routes for traveling teams were from New York City north to Albany, and west to Buffalo. It was uncommon to find nationally known stars straying from those paths to visit the state’s northernmost regions, but in 1934 — 85 years ago this week — Plattsburgh and other lucky sites played host to sports royalty in the person of Mildred “Babe” Didrikson. At the very least, she was the equal of most men in several sports. Invariably, she is listed among the greatest female athletes of the 20th century. Compilations, like this one by Sports Illustrated, usually place her at the top among athletes who specialized in single disciplines, but when it comes to all-round talents and achievements, there are few if any challengers to Didrikson. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Ticonderoga Historical To Conserve Battlefields Mural

clegg muralThe Ticonderoga Historical Society has received a grant of $7,500 for the conservation of a mural depicting the significant historic battlefields from Plattsburgh to Saratoga.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Fort William Henry Corp Under New Leadership

Fort William Henry Hotel The Board of Directors of Fort William Henry Corporation has announced the election of Kathryn Flacke Muncil, Sebastian J. Luciano, and Nancy Flacke Reuss to a new executive leadership team.

The first Fort William Henry Hotel opened in 1855. The resort, one of the oldest and largest on Lake George, now includes the Fort William Henry Hotel and Conference Center, the Best Western Hotel at Exit 21 and the recreated Fort William Henry, site of a pivotal 1757 French and Indian War battle.

» Continue Reading.