Monday, May 2, 2016

Exhibit On Explorer Floyd Bennett Opening In Ticonderoga

floyd bennettThe Ticonderoga Historical Society opens its third exhibit of the 2016 season this Friday, May 6, at 6:30 pm at the Hancock House. “From the Adirondacks to the Arctic” examines the life of local resident Floyd Bennett, who piloted Admiral Richard E. Byrd on his controversial and historic 1926 flight over the North Pole.

Also included in the exhibit is a broader discussion of local connections to exploration, including the USS Ticonderoga’s (CVS14) role in spacecraft recovery. The ship participated in the Apollo 16 and 17 and Skylab programs during the early 1970s. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 28, 2016

POW Labor Camps in the Adirondacks

PineCamp1942The word Adirondack calls to mind many things — natural beauty, family playground, sporting opportunities, colorful history — but nothing so dark as prisoner-of-war host.

Yet during the last world war (let’s hope it was the last), followers of Hitler and Mussolini populated the North Country. Volumes have been written about the suffering endured in POW camps, but for countries adhering to the Geneva Conventions, there was a clear set of rules to follow. Among them was that prisoners must receive adequate provisions and supplies (food, clothing, living quarters), and if put to work, they must be paid. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 28, 2016

Historic Saranac Lake Seeks Roaring Twenties Artifacts

The Saranac Laboratory MuseumHistoric Saranac Lake is seeking the community’s help as the organization creates a new museum exhibit on the roaring twenties. The exhibit, titled, “A Grand Hotel” will feature artifacts of the 1920s. Historic Saranac Lake staff is hoping that community members will help by loaning artifacts for the exhibit.

“We are seeking items of clothing, jewelry, and other artifacts that are of the time period,” said Public Programs Coordinator Chessie Monks-Kelly. “We are particularly interested in items connected with local hotels of the 1920s.” » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Champlain Canal Region Gateway Visitors Center Planned

champlain canal region gateway visitors center conceptAt a recent Saratoga County Board of Supervisors meeting, Mechanicville Town Supervisor and Historic Hudson – Hoosic Rivers Partnership Chair Tom Richardson unveiled the design of a new regional visitors center that is to be constructed near Fort Hardy Park in the Village of Schuylerville.

The Champlain Canal Region Gateway Visitors Center is hoped to serve as a catalyst for sustainable tourism development and community revitalization in Rensselaer, Saratoga and Washington counties and to introduce locals and travelers alike to the historically significant and culturally unique destinations in the Champlain Canal Region of Lakes to Locks Passage. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Lake Placid Olympic Museum Staff Recognized

lake placid museum award of meritLake Placid Olympic Museum staff members Alison Haas and Susanna Fout have received the Individual Achievement Award of Merit from the Museum Association of New York. The award was presented at the Museum Association of New York’s Annual Conference on Monday in Lake Placid.

The Awards of Merit program acknowledges programs and individuals who have made the state’s museum community richer and more relevant. The Olympic Museum’s achievements in 2015 are highlighted by the establishment of new exhibits and programs, its expanded outreach and educational programs, and an increased presence in both the local and broader sports communities. In addition, the museum has made strides in assuring the preservation and accessibility of its collections. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Land of the Heathens: The Wildest Adirondacks Ever!

BishopRHNelsonFervent pleas for aid to missionaries around the world are common, and by no means a recent phenomenon. Take, for instance, the effort led by Episcopalian Bishop Richard H. Nelson in the Albany area in 1913. Said the Glens Falls Daily Times, “It is the intention of Bishop Nelson to organize a missionary league in the diocese for the purpose of raising sufficient money to carry on the work of building up parishes in the neglected sections.” Nelson displayed a map of those neglected sections, where, he said, “The condition is almost unbelievable.”

When I was much younger, one of the most beloved and respected teachers in our local school left to work in the missions in Africa. She described many of the same problems voiced by Nelson: poverty, illiteracy, poor spiritual condition, and a disturbing lack of morals. In both cases (Nelson’s and the teacher’s), the viewpoint was from a devout Christian perspective (our teacher was a Catholic nun). » Continue Reading.


Friday, April 15, 2016

Friends of Camp Santanoni Welcome DEC Management Plan

IMG_3836The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) recently finalized a management plan dedicating more restoration and maintenance to Newcomb’s historic Great Camp Santanoni.

According to Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) Executive Director Steven Engelhart the preservation of Camp Santanoni was one of the first issues that helped to form the nonprofit preservation organization. Now, 25 years later, AARCH continues to provide historic outreach, education and advocacy around the Adirondack Park. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 10, 2016

Phil Brown: The True History of Mud Pond Waterway

john caffryLast month, the state’s top tribunal, the Court of Appeals, heard arguments in a legal dispute over the public’s right to paddle a two-mile stretch of water near Lake Lila. It is sometimes referred to as the Mud Pond Waterway.

I paddled the waterway in 2009 and was sued for trespass the following year. A state Supreme Court judge dismissed the lawsuit in 2013. The Appellate Division upheld the ruling in 2015, but the landowners appealed a second time.

Given that a ruling in the Court of Appeals could have statewide ramifications, there is a fair amount of interest in the case. Several reporters and photographers attended the oral arguments, and a number of newspapers around the state and outside the state ran stories.

Some news stories said the appellants — the Brandreth Park Association and the Friends of Thayer Lake — have owned the property since the mid-1800s. This is understandable, as a summary of the case on the Court of Appeals website stated that the land in question has been in the hands of the Brandreth family “since an ancestor bought it from the State in 1851.” » Continue Reading.


Friday, April 8, 2016

Fort Fever Talk Explains Ticonderoga Redoubts

redoubt event fort tiFort Ticonderoga’s final Fort Fever lecture for 2016 takes place on Sunday, April 10, at 2 pm with “Building 18th-Century Redoubts” presented by Assistant Military Programs Supervisor Nicholas Spadone.

From theory to practice, the lecture will examine the construction of redoubts along the Ticonderoga peninsula. This program looks at the science and geometry used in the layout process closely followed by American officers. Participants will be able to explore the literature that influenced young officers to make such fortifications in a brand new American Army.

“Building 18th-Century Redoubts” will begin with a presentation in the Mars Education Center and conclude with a walking tour of Fort Ticonderoga’s redoubts, the largest surviving network of Revolutionary War earthworks in North America. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Hamilton County Bicentennial Celebration Planned

hamilton county bicentenial logoThe celebration of Hamilton County’s bicentennial begins on April 12th, 200 years to the day after the provisional creation of the county in 1816.

The year of events gets started at 10:30 am April 12 with a birthday party for the county, held at the County Courthouse in Lake Pleasant. State Senator Hugh Farley and Assemblyman Mark Butler will join other officials on the steps of the courthouse. A small reception with birthday cake will follow, and Hamilton County Historian Eliza Darling will offer tours of the historic county complex. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 2, 2016

F. C. Moore’s Big Moose Lake Retreat

big moose campIn the late 19th century, the Adirondacks became a prime summer destination for sportsmen and their families who enjoyed the region’s hunting, fishing, and fresh air. By the 1880s, wealthy businessmen were building permanent camps on even the remotest lakes, including Big Moose, near Old Forge. Sometime after 1880, local guides Jack Sheppard and Richard C. Crego built a summer camp on South Bay of Big Moose Lake for F. C. Moore of New York City.

Francis Cruger Moore was born in Houston, TX in 1842. After the Civil War, he headed north to New York City, where through hard work, he became president (1889-1903) of the Continental Insurance Company.

Moore, his step-son Henry Evans, and their wives summered at Big Moose regularly. To reach the camp, Moore and his guests had to travel north to Boonville, NY, and then survive a tortuous 43-mile journey on primitive roads, a rickety wooden-railed railroad (The Peg Leg Railroad), a riverboat, and finally a guide boat across several lakes. Moore invested heavily in the main camp which stood near the present Manse of the Big Moose Community Chapel. By 1889, a second camp was built nearby for the Evanses. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Remarkable Women of Clinton County

remarkable women of clinton countyTo celebrate Women’s History Month, the Clinton County Historical Association will host Clinton County Historian Anastasia Pratt for a presentation on Women of Clinton County.

To complement the release of her 2015 book, Remarkable Women of Clinton County, Pratt will give an encore presentation, focusing specifically on the stories of Clinton County’s most influential women through the decades and how they are remembered today.

The presentation will take place on Monday, April 4th at 7 pm at the Clinton County Historical Museum. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 26, 2016

Mary Ann Day Brown, Widow of John Brown

john brownLast weekend, the Saratoga Historical Society in California celebrated the 200th birthday of Mary Ann Day Brown, wife of radical abolitionist John Brown. The milestone was observed a few weeks prior to her actual birthday (April 15) to coincide with the Blossom Festival…. but, wait. Doesn’t John Brown’s body lie a moldering in his grave in New York State? Yes, it does, in the Adirondacks near Lake Placid. The grave of his second wife Mary however, is at the other end of the country, in Saratoga, California’s Madronia Cemetery.

It is all rather ironic since the life of Mary Ann Day started 200 years ago on April 15, 1816, in Granville in Washington County. Mary was a quite ordinary woman of the 1800s: quiet, modest, godly, and usually poor. Scores of thousands such lives pass unnoticed; history tends to remember women of wealth, beauty or offbeat wackiness if it recalls their existence at all. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 22, 2016

The Dangerous Work Of Adirondack Forest Rangers

Forest Rangers DEC PhotoForest Rangers are often thought to have an idyllic profession and it is an exceptional job, but not without risks. The terrain is often difficult and assistance hours away.

For example, during the recent recovery of hiker Hua Davis on MacNaughton, a Forest Ranger was accidentally submerged up to his chest in a freezing mountain brook – a perilous situation when you are 13 miles by trail from the nearest road.

Although New York State Forest Rangers have an excellent safety record, there have been numerous fatalities in the line of duty and many injuries. What follows are just a few examples. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 21, 2016

Pioneering Nurse Linda Richards (Conclusion)

LRichardsP3After a few months’ stay in France, Potsdam native Linda Richards arrived back in the United States in March 1891. With the best credentials in the world for training nurses, she developed new programs or redesigned existing ones at many facilities during the next two decades.

Among them were the Philadelphia Visiting Nurses’ Society; Kirkbride’s Hospital for the Insane (Philadelphia); the Methodist Episcopal Hospital (Philadelphia); the New England Hospital for Women and Children (Roxbury, Massachusetts); and the Brooklyn Homeopathic Hospital (New York City). In 1895, during her tenure at Brooklyn, she was elected president of the newly founded American Society of Superintendents of Training Schools for Nurses. Describing the changes she had seen since the early 1870s, Richards called it a “revolution of feeling toward training schools and trained nurses.”

While working with the society, she continued building and improving programs in facilities that included the Hartford Hospital (Connecticut); the University of Pennsylvania Hospital (Philadelphia); the Taunton Hospital for the Insane (Massachusetts); the Worcester Hospital for the Insane (Massachusetts); and the Kalamazoo Insane Asylum (Michigan). » Continue Reading.