Wednesday, April 17, 2024

Author Glenn Pearsall to lead April 18 discussion at Union College

Union College Academy for Lifelong Learning (UCALL) and the Kelly Adirondack Center are pleased to present a presentation featuring author Glenn Pearsall who will lead a discussion on his book, When Men and Mountains Meet: Stories of Hope and Despair in the Adirondack Wilderness after the American Revolution. The event will take place at the Old Chapel on Thursday, April 18, 2024 at 5:30 p.m., with refreshments available beginning at 5 p.m. This presentation is free and open to the public.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 14, 2024

Outdoor recreation advocates seek input on waterway accessibility

90-Miler paddlers navigate their way through Raquette Lake.

The Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT) and the Rivers, Trails & Conservation Assistance (RTCA) program of the National Parks Service are partnering on a survey to better understand accessibility along the waterways of the Northern Forest region.

The goal of the partnership between the NFCT and RTCA is to improve access for adaptive paddlers and anyone with a disability or mobility challenge interested in paddlesports. The Northern Forest Canoe Trail Accessibility Survey represents the first step in the planning process for this project.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 13, 2024

Lake George Association receives grant for Floating Classroom, Stream Education program

Lake George, NY — The Lake George Association (LGA) received a $5,000 grant from the Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s Outdoor Fund for operational costs of the LGA’s Floating Classroom. This is the first grant awarded to the LGA from the Outdoor Fund, which aims to connect new audiences to the outdoors. American children spend three times as many hours in front of screens as they do outdoors, says the 501(c)(3) charity, which seeks to introduce a new generation to the wonders of the natural world.

The Floating Classroom is an ideal platform for that. Established in 1991, the spring-through-fall program educates approximately 1,700 students (grades 3–12) and 400 adults every year about freshwater protection.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 11, 2024

Why Spring Smells So Good

Raindrops fall on a plant

As the soil warms up in April and May and green plants spring forth once again, a delicate aroma hangs in the air, apart from any floral scent wafting on the breeze. It’s earthy and fresh, and I find it almost intoxicating. It turns out that spring’s special perfume has some fun and quirky root causes. 

Spring’s perfume has long intrigued humans, to the point that sixty years ago, Australian scientists gave it a name: “petrichor.” Greek in origin, this word means “smells like a rock.” Or something like that. Not long after the wondrous bouquet of spring got its official name, British scientists in the UK found its main source, a tertiary alcohol they dubbed “geosmin,” another Greek-based term. Roughly translated, it means “smells like a rock.” 

» Continue Reading.


Friday, March 8, 2024

A Forest for the Trees

Bare Root White Pine & Cedar Transplants Purchased from Soil & Conservation

A Forest for the Trees

 

As late winter’s warming temps tease, and peeking bud tips hint at another spring’s promise, it’s a good time to make preparations and plans to plant trees for our future north woods forests.

 

For some tactics, tips, techniques, and lessons learned from my personal tree planting journey, click the link and read on.


Thursday, March 7, 2024

Nature’s Healing Touch: Exploring Mindfulness in the Adirondacks

A Spring Beauty flower

By Emily Bohnet

Nestled amidst the breathtaking Adirondack Mountains lies a haven of tranquility, inviting us to bask in the warmth of nature’s embrace. In this enchanted realm, where the whispering pines sway in gentle rhythms and the rivers run powerful and free, we are invited to explore mindfulness and discover calm and quiet around us. 

What Makes Mindfulness So Special?

Mindfulness is not just a practice; it’s a way of life—a gentle reminder to savor each moment, to cherish the simple joys, and to embrace the beauty that surrounds us. In the Adirondacks, mindfulness takes on a magical quality, inviting us to slow down, breathe deeply, and connect with the soul-stirring wonders of the natural world.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 5, 2024

Day Four: A rescuer’s account of a hiker’s baffling survival

The route of the Upper Valley Wilderness Response Team

By James Mason, UVWRT Safety Officer

On a chilly night in early May 2009, the pager sounded. New Hampshire Fish and Game (NHFG) summoned our Upper Valley Wilderness Response Team (UVWRT) to assist with a search. A man in his 60s was missing on or around Franconia Ridge in the White Mountains. NHFG officers and two other rescue teams had already searched the steep area without finding him or identifying any clues that might lead to refining their search strategy.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, February 12, 2024

Trekking through Rockwood State Forest

Rockwood State Forest sign.

Today, [Saturday, Jan. 27] I joined members of the Alpiners hiking club for a trek through part of the Rockwood State Forest in Fulton County. It was 35 degrees [with zero] precipitation as compared to last Saturday’s 4 degrees!  We were prepared with both snowshoes and microspikes.  Because it has been fairly warm and so rainy, we decided we only needed the spikes and hiking poles. Piper the Wonder Dog and Nikki also joined in the fun.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, December 26, 2023

DEC tips for “sharing the snow” this winter

A group of people walking into the woods in winter

Winter is a great time to be outside in New York. Winter hiking, snowshoeing, skiing, birding, snowmobiling, hunting, trapping, and ice fishing are among the most popular activities available to residents and visitors alike. Whether you seek solitude or excitement, you can find it in New York during winter.

One Property, Many Uses
Many forms of winter recreation can and do take place simultaneously on the same public or private property without conflict. It just takes a little advanced planning, respect, and common courtesy among users. Whether recreating on public land or private land where you have permission, you should be aware of the types of activities that also may be taking place on the property you are using. It’s always a good idea to ask a landowner if others will be present when you wish to pursue your pastime, whether that involves snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, trapping, or hunting rabbits or deer. We all share the outdoors, the snow, the woods, and the fields. Just as it is the case during warmer months, being considerate of others is vital when sharing the snow in winter.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, December 16, 2023

Four NY counties designated as primary natural disaster areas

rainstorm in the distance

On December 8, Governor Kathy Hochul announced that four counties in New York State have been designated as a primary natural disaster area by the United States Department of Agriculture due to damage caused by a tornado and excessive rain in July. This designation means that impacted farmers in Clinton, Franklin, Lewis, and Onondaga County may be eligible for assistance, including emergency loans, from the United States Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency.

“As climate change continues to drive more frequent and extreme weather events in our state, New Yorkers faced unprecedented levels of rain in July that flooded our communities and devastated crop land,” Governor Hochul said. “This designation will help ensure New York farmers significantly impacted by this summer’s severe weather have access to the resources they need to help rebuild and recover.”

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, December 12, 2023

Super Modeling

female model on runway

Weather modeling has become quite a big deal in recent decades, with meteorologists falling all over themselves to report what the latest models say. It sounds like a fun job, and I’m trying to find out how to apply to become a weather modeler. If it involves appearing in a swimsuit, though, forget it.

I love it when a radio announcer chirps “clear and sunny” during a storm because they read the outlook without first going to the window to have a look out. Funny how reality can boost the accuracy of weather reports. So, when you can’t even bank on today’s forecast, it’s normal to view long-range projections with a skeptical eye.

However, seasonal models are very good at foreseeing key trends such as droughts or severe hurricane seasons. You can depend on models if they call for above-average precipitation this winter. But if you want to know if it will snow on a given day next week, you’ll have to listen to the radio. Or flip a coin.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, December 10, 2023

Poinsettia: A Sub-Tropical Plant That’s A Christmas Tradition 

Illustration of a poinsettia

Poinsettias are among the most popular potted flowering or foliage plants of the Christmas Season. They have been for decades. According to the 2020 United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Floriculture Report; the most recent statistics available); the wholesale value of U.S. grown poinsettias, that year, was $157-million. At the retail level, by most estimates, poinsettias contribute more than $250-million to the U.S. economy.

Paul Ecke Ranch 

Long-recognized as the largest and most successful poinsettia breeder in the world, Paul Ecke Ranch in Encinitas, California was founded in 1924, by German immigrant entrepreneurs who moved to the U.S. in 1902. For three generations, the Ecke family grew and sold poinsettias; first as cut flowers and field-grown landscape and mother plants and, eventually, as greenhouse-grown stock-plants. They moved their stock-production facility to Guatemala during the 1990s and, in 2012, sold the business and the name. The leadership team stayed on.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, November 29, 2023

What’s In A Name: Styles Brook of Keene

 

styles brook book cover

By John Sasso

Recently, author and Keene resident Lorraine Duvall released her latest book, Where the Styles Brook Waters Flow: The Place I Call Home. Her book is a collection of stories which were told to her by her neighbors about life along the Styles Brook Valley, along with her own personal recollections. The waters of Styles Brook flow westward for about seven miles from The Glen, a hamlet tucked between the Jay and Hurricane Mountains, into the East Branch of the Ausable River. The brook is fed by smaller brooks and ponds on these mountains, such as O’Connell Brook, Madden Brook, and Merriam Swamp.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, November 26, 2023

Houseplants: Gardening Indoors During the Winter 

Geranium in a pot

The idea of taking plants from the wild and bringing them indoors seems to fly in the face of all things natural. But starting somewhere around 1,000 BC, plants and small trees were being used as ornamental features in homes, in several ancient civilizations.

A Brief History 

We know, from early paintings and sculptures, that the ancient Greeks and Romans grew plants in containers. And that in ancient India, Japan, and Egypt, potted ornamental plants were commonly placed in courtyards and home gardens. It really isn’t much of a stretch then, to hypothesize that some of those plants were taken into homes. In fact, evidence of wild plants being successfully cultivated indoors can be found in ancient Egyptian writings. And for centuries, the Japanese have employed the dwarfing of trees and other plants for room ornaments; a practice known as bonsai tree cultivation.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, November 6, 2023

Poetry: Woods-Speak

Leaves on a forest floor

By Jack Carney

The winds blew fiercely across
the lake for three days without
letup – no weathervane needed
to know they were nor’easters.
The trees lakeside told me,
whipped about, bowing and scraping to the
southwest, oranges and reds stripped away.

» Continue Reading.



Wait! Before you go:

Catch up on all your Adirondack
news, delivered weekly to your inbox