Wednesday, August 10, 2022

Adirondack Garden Club announces 2022 Ellen Lea Paine Memorial Nature Fund grant awardees

KEENE— Named for one of the Adirondack Garden Club’s most outstanding members, the Ellen Lea Paine Memorial Nature Fund was established in 2005 to give financial assistance to individuals and not-for-profit organizations involved in programs whose purpose is to study, protect and enjoy the natural environment within the Adirondack Park. Mrs. Paine, who passed away in 2005, was an avid gardener who took great pride in the gardens of her family properties.

This year, the Ellen Lea Paine Memorial Nature Fund awarded eight grants ranging up to $1,500.

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Monday, August 8, 2022

Land of the Towering White Pines

White Pine west of Crane Mountain, Warren County

About 30 years ago I built a 16’x20’ shed to store my canoes, the riding lawnmower, my chainsaws and assorted wood scraps. There was a cute 8 foot white pine near the site that I left because it looked pretty. That “cute little white pine” has grown; it towered into the sky and its increasing diameter reached and pushed against the roof of my shed such that, as that white pine swayed in the wind, it caused my shed to creak and groan.

Clearly it had to come down (the tree, not the shed). Once on the ground it measured over 60 feet tall.

Earlier this summer my son Adam helped me take down a 90 footer which was only 50 feet from our house and leaning towards the house, with the prevailing winds pushing it from behind. Although white pine can get big, their root systems are surprisingly small and shallow, making them subject to blow down. Our April 14th storm, 14” of wet snow, took down a large white pine just across our street that tore out the power and broadband for 3 days and splintered the power pole 20 feet away into 3 pieces. Although it measured more than 70 feet high and had a chest height diameter of 28”, its root span was only 10 feet wide and 4 feet deep.

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Saturday, August 6, 2022

Loon banding is a lot like fishing…you don’t get them all

Fairly typical weather for the Adirondacks with warm days and cool nights with fog over the lakes brought about by the cool air over the warmer lake surface. We again had a couple rainy periods, so I didn’t have to water the garden or the flower beds. The flowers have been going like gang busters, lots of greenery and many blooms. The bee balm is in full flower, and I was just looking out the window before dark and there were six hummers searching out each red bloom and fighting over the next one.

 

Great Grand Daughter Milly Jade Peterson has been the hit of every party for our family out in the Rochester area. As the photo [below] will show, she is already a real show off. Speaking of hummers, Ted Hicks and I plan on being at Stillwater banding hummers on Saturday, August 6, but that hasn’t been set in stone yet. We usually get there about 7:30 a.m. and band until about 11 a.m., depending on how many birds are around. Right now, they are about at their peak number-wise with the little ones out of the nest, and males still hanging on territory.

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Thursday, August 4, 2022

Old Forge Library to host Sue Kiesel’s Healing Power of Photographing Outdoors presentation on Aug. 11

On August 11 at 5 p.m., the Local Histories and Stories Series will feature Sue Kiesel and her presentation on The Healing Power of Photographing Outdoors in the Adirondacks at the Old Forge Library.

Sue is a lifelong lover of the Adirondacks, having been here her entire life as a seasonal resident. She began her current passion for photography 15 years ago and is a true addict!  She enjoys, more than anything, sharing her captures. It is her greatest desire to sway others to appreciate the healing quality that nature offers all of us. If others catch the bug, perhaps they too will learn how fragile mother nature is and promote protecting it for the many generations to come.

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Tuesday, August 2, 2022

ACLC invites anglers to exchange lead fishing tackle to protect wildlife

Saranac Lake, NY – The Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation invites New York anglers to exchange their lead fishing tackle for $10 worth of non-toxic tackle through its Lead Tackle Buy-Back Program. Anglers can trade in their lead sinkers and jigs this summer and fall by bringing them to any of the eleven participating retailers around the Adirondack Park, including:

·        Blue Line Sports in Saranac Lake
·        Cloud-Splitter Outfitters in Newcomb
·        Crossroads in Chestertown
·        Fish307.com in Lake George
·        Hoss’s Country Corner in Long Lake
·        Norm’s Bait & Tackle in Crown Point
·        Old Forge Hardware
·        Pine’s Country Store in Indian Lake
·        Raquette River Outfitters in Tupper Lake
·        The Red Top Inn in Tupper Lake
·        Woods and Waters in Saranac Lake

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Sunday, July 31, 2022

Hiking with Grandma Beth: Old Forge resident shares coverage of Loon Census, Moose River Plains

As another extension of our initial post about an Old Forge grandmother, Beth Pashley, avid hiker and talented photographer, The Adirondack Almanack will be featuring snippets of Pashley’s hiking adventures on a year-round basis including her visually-striking and artistic nature photographs. Pashley was inspired to embrace the great outdoors with her grandchildren starting at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, dubbing the family bonding time as “The Grandma Chronicles.”

 

Our last Hiking with Grandma Beth post was published in April, so we thought it was high time to reintroduce her photography to readers, this time by covering her recent excursion to Moose River Plains, as well as to highlight her involvement in the 2022 NY Loon Census.

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Sunday, July 31, 2022

Adirondack Lakes Alliance annual symposium slated for Aug. 5

 

PAUL SMITHS (July 27, 2022) – Registration is now open for the Adirondack Lakes Alliance symposium, which will take place 8:30am – 4:00 pm on Friday, August 5.   

The 7th annual event will be held at Paul Smith’s College and there is a $25 fee to register, which includes lunch.
Attendees will receive an update from Dr. Dan Kelting, executive director of the Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute, on the progress of the Adirondack Road Salt Reduction Task Force. Also featured is Chris Mikolajczyk, the current president of the North American Lake Management Society and senior aquatic ecologist at PrincetonHydro. Chris will present about the benefits to lake associations from developing a comprehensive lake management plan.
There will be a resource fair featuring regional organizations and agencies and a series of small group presentations focusing on three key topics. The first covers aquatic invasive species management tools including herbicide treatment and details about the new NYS Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention Certification Program. The second topic is about on-site wastewater systems on our lake shores, specifically looking at impacts and solutions. The final topic will discuss community education and training resources for lake association members, specifically engaging youth, residents, and other members of the public. All attendees will have the opportunity to attend all three sessions.

Saturday, July 30, 2022

Banding and testing loons for pollutants with the Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation

It took a whole week with temperatures in the high eighties before the thunderstorms made it here. The storms dumped almost two inches of rain at Eight Acre Wood overnight, so again I don’t have to water the garden. I did have to water my tomato trees that are in pots almost everyday during that hot time. I’ve picked a few cherry tomatoes which are a tasty bite. The larger tomatoes are growing daily after I pruned off the leaves that had no flowers on them, and now I can even see tomatoes growing.

 

Most of my loons have hatched their young, but I still have one sitting on eggs. The male was glued to the nest yesterday while the female was at a neighboring lake fishing. If the eggs are going to hatch it should happen this week. Sometimes the eggs get chilled in high water and the eggs are not going to hatch. However, the adults sit on them sometimes for over forty days before giving up. Locally, most of the nests have been successful this year, and there are chicks on many of the local lakes. If you come upon them in your travels, give them some space. Don’t force them out into open water when they are hugging the shoreline fishing and keeping out of boat traffic.

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Wednesday, July 27, 2022

Stewardship projects enhance access to Franklin, Union Falls ponds

FRANKLIN, NY — The Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT) has completed a series of stewardship projects that improve access to Franklin Falls Pond and Union Falls Pond and mitigate negative environmental impacts to both water bodies.

“These projects are the latest in a long string of work by the NFCT in this area,” said Noah Pollock, NFCT’s stewardship director. “Franklin and Union Falls ponds are two jewels along the Saranac River — they don’t see the same crowds or traffic as other Adirondack lakes, but are equally beautiful. Our crew worked to formalize an access at the northern end of Franklin Falls Pond long used by paddlers to access the lake. It was a steep, eroding bank that led folks to access the water from a variety of different places, which created a lot of impacts on the shoreline vegetation. We built an 8-foot-wide set of timber stairs that are attractive and easy to use, and installed rocks at other informal access points to discourage use.”

Tuesday, July 26, 2022

Raquette Lake: Great Camp Sagamore offers guided history hikes

Hiking enthusiasts of all ages and abilities are encouraged to take advantage of a unique opportunity to embark on an educational guided hike where participants will venture into the great outdoors at Great Camp Sagamore and learn about the area’s rich history.

Great Camp Sagamore once had a farm, a 100,000-gallon covered reservoir, and a hydroelectric powerhouse, all hidden away in the surrounding forest. These historic structures were located conveniently close by for the workers who operated them, but hidden from view for the Vanderbilt’s distinguished guests.

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Monday, July 25, 2022

Pondering An Old Friend

serviceberry

By D.C. Rohleder

As I sit on a West-facing porch on a humid mid-July morning drinking strong black coffee, my attention  is drawn to an ailing old Friend. This Friend has been a rock for me and others in the 20+ years I have lived here – providing entertainment, respite, and nourishment for myself and numerous species of wildlife. No other organism on my property is more magnanimous.

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Monday, July 25, 2022

DEC Proposes Improvements to State’s Forest Tax Law Program

dec logo

Public Comment Period on Proposed New and Improved Regulations Now through September 19; Two Virtual Public Comment Hearings Scheduled for September 13

On July 13, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced proposed changes to the implementing regulations for Real Property Tax Law Section 480a, also known as the Forest Tax Law. The comprehensive overhaul of these nearly 50-year-old regulations will lessen the administrative burden on participating forest landowners, help DEC promote compliance with requirements in place, and maintain and improve sustainable timber management on enrolled lands.

“The Forest Tax Law Program provides private forest landowners a significant real property tax reduction on enrolled forest lands in exchange for managing their timber resource for the long-term with the support of professional foresters,” said Commissioner Seggos. “Privately owned forests make up to 74 percent of the total forest land area in New York, and healthy, well-managed forests are essential for supporting our economy, protecting water and air quality, providing wildlife habitat, and improving forest carbon storage and sequestration, supporting the State’s climate efforts.”

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Monday, July 25, 2022

ADK, The Nature Conservancy improve access at Silver Lake Bog Preserve

 

July 25, 2022 — Black Brook, NY — The Nature Conservancy’s Silver Lake Bog Preserve’s nature trail is now more safe, sustainable, and accessible after a month of work by ADK’s professional trail crew. Part of a multi-year effort to make the Silver Lake Bog Preserve more accessible to all, The Nature Conservancy in the Adirondacks contracted with ADK to rebuild a bridge, reroute unsustainable trail sections, and establish a formal trail to the bluff viewpoint, which includes wooden ladders to increase safety.

The Silver Lake Bog Preserve is a publicly accessible 98-acre property that features a boardwalk that winds through an ancient peatland bog, the unsung hero of carbon capture, hardwood forests, and spectacular views of the surrounding landscape. The improved trail travels 1.5 miles through the Preserve and features a 200-foot bluff overlooking Silver Lake and Whiteface Mountain.

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Monday, July 25, 2022

DEC seeks public’s help reporting Asian Longhorned Beetle sightings

Adult Asian Longhorned Beetles (ALB) are active from late July through September. The ALB (Anoplophora glabripennis) is an invasive wood-boring insect that feeds on a variety of hardwoods including maple, birch, elm, ash, poplar, horsechestnut, and willow, among others.

Native to China and Korea, the beetles are approximately 1.5 inches long and shiny black, with white spots on their wing cases. They have black and white antennae that can be up to twice as long as their body. (They should not be confused with the native white-spotted pine sawyer, which has a distinctive white spot on their back, below their head.)

If they are in your neighborhood, it’s possible one will end up in your pool. The more “eyes” we have looking for infestations, the better chance of finding new ones early and eliminating them. ALB attacks and kills hardwoods, and they emerge from infested trees in the late summer to find a new host.

The DEC invites pool owners to check filters for the invasive insect regularly and submit a report if any are found. YOU are the key to keeping our forests free of ALB.

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Saturday, July 23, 2022

Loon Census 2022, observing hummingbirds, bears and deer from front porch

A little rain kept my garden growing and flowers blooming. My bee balm has come out, giving the hummers a new place to eat in both the front and back yards. Karen and I sat on the front porch
yesterday (July 17) and the hummer feeders were a beehive of activity all afternoon. In the morning we had a mother bear come through with two of last year’s cubs checking out the bird feeders. The mother and one cub walked around the electric fence. The other cub got confused as to where the others went. It tried to go through the fence, but took a shot and backed off. Then it circled around looking for mom and hit the fence again. It left in a hurry that time, and probably will not try that again.

A few minutes later, there was a doe with twin fawns who were nursing together out in front of the house. It would have made a great picture as they were right in a sunshine spot, but the camera was in the truck. Many birds have been bringing their young ones to the feeders for a snack. Several Blue Jays with young have been coming every day. I set the Potter traps yesterday and caught five of the young ones. I also caught an older Jay that I had banded as a juvenile in July of 2014 which made that bird 8 years and two months old. That is one of the oldest returns I’ve had of a Jay. They usually eat and run never to be seen again, but not this one. I also caught some juvenile Slate-Colored Juncos who were still sporting some pin feathers.

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