Friday, October 27, 2017

Reflections on Roadkill

moose Every so often, my friend David texts me a picture of roadkill. A fisher trailing a single strand of blood-red sinew. A wind-roused pile of porcupine quills. A bobcat in graceful, permanent repose. One year, he built extra time into his schedule so he could stop to document every carcass on his daily commute – 40 critters in all, not including salamanders, snakes, and myriad other wildlife too small to be seen from a moving vehicle.

What David knows, and what I too have come to appreciate, is that roadkill is not mere gore. Roadkill is, in fact, an opportunity, a chance to look closely at the bodies of animals who would otherwise fly, dart, or scamper away from us. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 26, 2017

Emerald Ash Borer Class for Woodland Owners Planned

emerald ash borer photo courtesy DECThis August, the emerald ash borer (EAB) was confirmed in both St. Lawrence and Franklin counties. The Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), and NYS Agriculture and Markets will hold a class on EAB on November 1, 2017 from 5:45 to 8 pm at the Cornell Cooperative Extension Learning Farm, 2043 State Route 68, Canton. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Ecology of Adirondack Wildfires

orthway Fire Just South of Pottersville, April 2012 (Jonathan Sinopoli Photo)There are several natural disasters that can alter the ecological make-up of an area. Widespread tree disease, severe winds, and intense ice storms can all seriously damage or destroy the dominant members of a forest community. However, the most catastrophic force of nature is fire, as a major blaze can significantly impact more than just the composition of trees that cover a given location.

Unlike other natural calamities, fire can wipe out most of the plants that root in an area. In an ice storm, or a major wind event, it is primarily the older and taller trees that are subject to the greatest devastation. Seedlings, saplings, the various shrubs that form the understory and the array of herbaceous plants that grow on the forest floor often benefit from the increase in sunlight that result when the canopy has been drastically thinned or eliminated. During an intense fire, however, the entire plant community can be obliterated. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Applications Sought for Master Gardener Training

Master Gardeners working at Eastside Center in Glens FallsApplications are being accepted for the Warren County Master Gardener Training Program, which will begin in January 2018. The program is open to anyone who has an interest in expanding their gardening experience and knowledge.

The Master Gardener Training Program is packed with information provided by the many scientists, educators, and garden experts associated with Cornell University. The course includes information about: botany; entomology; organic gardening; soil health; use of fertilizers; plant diseases; good flower, fruit and vegetable growing practices; and wildlife management. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Can Wooly Bear Caterpillars Predict Winter Weather?

wooly bearThe woolly bear caterpillar is the larval stage of the Isabella tiger moth, Pyrrharctia Isabella. The Isabella tiger moth overwinters in the larval stage. In the fall, caterpillars seek shelter under leaf litter or other protected places.  They eat mostly weeds, including dandelion, clover, and grasses. Woolly bears are relative speedsters in the caterpillar world, crawling at a neck-snapping .05 miles an hour, or about a mile a day.

The woolly bear caterpillar — with its distinct segments of black and reddish-brown — has the reputation of being able to forecast the coming winter weather. According to legend, the wider that middle brown section is, the milder the coming winter will be. Conversely, a narrow brown band is said to predict a colder, snowier winter. Among a group of woolly bears, the stripes can vary greatly, making their forecast difficult to confirm; the same group of eggs can even hatch into caterpillars of varying dark and light bands. » Continue Reading.


Monday, October 23, 2017

Oil Transport Symposium Proceedings Now Available

Workshop participants map out the issues around crude oil transport in the Great Lakes system. Photo: K.Bunting-Howarth, NYSGNew York Sea Grant was among the nearly 130 federal, state and provincial governments; industry; NGOs; and academic entities that participated in the 2017 Crude Move Symposium addressing the economics, risks, and hazards of crude oil transport through such waters as the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River system and the Gulf of Mexico.

The 39-page proceedings and video recordings of the symposium are now available online. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 22, 2017

Paul Hetzler: If An Ash Tree Falls

Call it an infection or an epidemic, but even the most docile and pleasant woods will soon be transformed into Fangorn Forest. As far as anyone knows, local trees will probably not become animate like the ones in the fictional woodland of J.R.R. Tolkein’s trilogy. However, they may be just as dangerous, only for a different reason.

In The Lord of the Rings, trees were inherently good, and if provoked sufficiently could take up arms and kill lots of bad guys. Presumably our trees are also of good will, or at least do not have anything against humans in particular. But changes are coming within the next decade that will render them dangerous through no fault or intent of their own. » Continue Reading.


Friday, October 20, 2017

Bear Denning: Bears Are Making Their Beds

bear den The fields around our home are something of a bear buffet from mid-summer through fall: wild blueberries in July followed by blackberries, then apples come September, with beechnuts falling from the trees skirting the mown area. In our 13 years here, we’ve seen a mother bear noshing on fallen apples while her cubs scampered around in the tree above her, heard bears climbing and snapping the occasional apple branch while we lay in tents 20 yards away during a backyard campout, and even witnessed two cubs playing in our kids’ sandbox.

I’ve often wondered where the neighborhood bruins – otherwise known as American black bears (Ursus americanus) – den up for the winter. How do they decide where – and when – to hunker down for the cold season? » Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 19, 2017

A Curt Stager Lecture at Whallonsburg Grange

Whallonsburg Grange HallThe Whallonsburg Grange Hall will host a lecture by scientist, educator, and author Dr. Curt Stager on Sunday, October 29 at 3 pm. The Paul Smiths College professor will be speaking on “Leaving a Trace: Humans in the Adirondacks,” the final lecture in the fall Lyceum series “What’s the Big Idea?” Dr. Stager will be discussing his own research and the growing body of evidence about early habitation in the region – evidence that shows that human roots run deeper in the Adirondacks than those of the forest itself. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Following This Fall’s Bird Migration

birdwatchingEach fall, migrating birds can be seen flying south to their wintering grounds. This is the ideal time of year for New York residents and visitors to head to Bird Conservation Areas across the state for great bird watching opportunities.

Visitors can search fields and forests for warblers, sparrows, and other songbirds and explore lakes, ponds, and beaches to see waterfowl and shorebirds. While exploring, visitors can hawk watch to witness the raptor migration. » Continue Reading.


Monday, October 16, 2017

Adirondack Wildlife: Osprey Exit the Park

American OspreyAs the temperatures in the many lakes and ponds that dot the Adirondacks begin to cool, the fish inhabitants of these waterways start to spend more of their time at greater depths. While this change in the routine of these gilled vertebrates impacts the way late season anglers pursue them, it also affects the life of our region’s most effective surface fish predator – the osprey.

With its 4 to 5 foot wing span and 2 foot long body, the osprey is a bird that is difficult to overlook as it soars over a picturesque mountain lake, or perches on the limb close to the shore of a pristine pond. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 15, 2017

Cultivating Mushrooms in the Adirondacks

I absolutely love mushrooms. They add real zest and excitement to all sorts of recipes. I’ve been cooking with them all of my adult life. They’re the perfect choice for hearty, intensely satisfying, really-good-for-you, low-calorie meals. Great if you’re watching your waistline!

It’s easy and fun to cultivate edible mushrooms using logs, stumps, or other mediums (i.e. straw, corn cobs), and the moist shade of your wooded property. Each mushroom variety offers its own unique, often nutty flavor. And they’re packed full of nutrients; things like B-vitamins, including riboflavin (an essential dietary nutrient which plays a major role in red blood cell formation and energy production, and strengthens the immune system), niacin (a digestive aid that can help maintain good blood circulation, healthy skin condition, and brain function), and pantothenic acid (one of the most versatile and flexible vitamins). » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 15, 2017

Chirp, Click, Buzz: An Insect Orchestra

field crickets This time of year, I keep the windows cracked open on even marginally warm nights, savoring the sweet air that sifts through the screens. On that air comes the sound of others relishing the last bit of warmth before frost settles in: namely, crickets and katydids.

With trills and chirps, clicks and buzzing, these winged insects – all members of the order Orthoptera, along with grasshoppers – woo potential mates. This music is ancient – and has been a key to the insects’ survival for some 200 million years. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 8, 2017

Adirondack Birding: The Great Warbler Migration

Male Yellow WarblerFor most birds, autumn is a time of migration. As is the case in spring, not all species engage in their bouts of long distance travel at the same time; some are known for heading out early while others linger in the region for several additional months before starting their journey.

Among the birds that are quick to depart the North Country are the warblers, a large group of small, delicate creatures that abound in the vast expanses of forests when daylight is at a maximum and bugs are at their peak. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, October 7, 2017

Painted Lady Butterflies Making Mass Migration

The Adirondack Park is tinted with a new hue of brown this past week, and not from the changing foliage of deciduous trees for winter. The painted lady butterfly with its cinnamon orange wings outlined by mocha appendages is making moves South for what is seemingly the “most massive migration since the ’80’s” as Chip Taylor of Monarch Watch claims.

Commonly mistaken for the monarch butterfly because of the similar coloration, the painted lady finds residence on all continents except for Australia and Antarctica. In the United States, extremely well breeding populations are found in the North, West and Eastern regions. Taylor said he is receiving “reports from Montreal to the Front Range of Colorado [that] entail the mid-continental migration of possibly billions of painted lady butterflies” this year. » Continue Reading.


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