Thursday, April 16, 2009

Adirondack Events for Mid-April

Rick Moody — author of Garden State, The Ice Storm, The Diviners and the memoir The Black Veil — will read from his most recent novel at 7 p.m. tonight at the Joan Weill Student Center of Paul Smith’s College. The event is free, sponsored by the Adirondack Center for Writing.

Kayaks are on roof racks and the Northern Forest Paddle Film Festival returns to the Lake Placid Center for the Arts at 7 p.m. Friday. There’ll be five shorts about canoeing, kayaking, waterways and the paddling life. Proceeds support the Northern Forest Canoe Trail. $8-12.

April brings the spring whomp. Old-time fiddle and harmonica duo the Whompers are back in town, 7:30 Friday at BluSeed Studios, in Saranac Lake ($10). Musicians are invited to bring instruments for a second-set jam. On Saturday night, Whompers and friends play at the Red Tavern, in Duane. The place is off the grid and off the map, and the dancing goes late into the night.

In the pastoral hill country east of Glens Falls and west of Vermont, 10,000 spectators are expected to turn out Saturday and Sunday for the Tour of the Battenkill, the largest bike race in the country. Two thousand riders will blow through downtown Greenwich, Salem and Cambridge, but the real character of the race comes from remote dirt roads that have earned the event the nickname Battenkill-Roubaix, after the Paris Roubaix of France.

In Bolton Landing, Up Yonda Farm offers a guided Cabin Fever Hike at 1 p.m. Saturday. The walk winds through the farm’s trails to a vista overlooking Lake George. On Sunday the farm will offer Earth Day activities all day. $3; members free.

Monday through Thursday next week, days start warming at the greatest rate of the year. Impatient? At the Adirondack Museum at 1:30 Sunday, naturalist Ed Kanze presents “Eventually . . . the Adirondack Spring.” Free for members and kids; $5 everybody else.

On Monday the Lake Placid Center for the Arts begins a six-session life drawing course, 6-8:30 every Monday evening through May. $55. Call (518) 523-2512 to sign up. Gabriels artist Diane Leifheit runs the course. She will also offer pastel plein air evening classes beginning May 20 (sign up by May 11). The first session introduces pastels and materials, setting up to paint outdoors and mixing colors. The following four sessions will go on location around Lake Placid (weather permitting), capturing the early evening colors. $95. 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays, through June 17.


Thursday, April 9, 2009

Leave No Child Inside Program at Adk Wild Center

The recipient of the 2008 Audubon Medal, Richard Louv identified a phenomenon many suspected existed but couldn’t quite put their finger on: nature-deficit disorder. Louv is a journalist and author of the New York Times bestseller Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder, is coming to the Adirondacks on Saturday, May 2nd to discuss the future relationship between nature and children. Since its initial publication, Last Child in the Woods has created a national conversation about the disconnection between children and nature, and his message has galvanized an international movement. Now, three years later, we have reached a tipping point, with the book inspiring Leave No Child Inside initiatives throughout the country.

According to Last Child in the Woods two out of ten of America’s children are clinically obese — four times the percentage of childhood obesity reported in the late 1960s. Children today spend less time playing outdoors than any previous generation. They are missing the opportunity to experience ‘free play’ outside in an unstructured environment that allows for exploration and expansion of their horizons through the use of their imaginations. In Sweden, Australia, Canada and the United States, studies of children in schoolyards with both green areas and manufactured play areas found that children engaged in more creative forms of play in the green areas.

Nature not only benefits children and ensures their participation and stewardship of nature as they grow into adults, nature helps entire families. Louv proposes, “Nature is an antidote. Stress reduction, greater physical health, a deeper sense of spirit, more creativity, a sense of play, even a safer life — these are the rewards that await a family when it invites more nature into children’s lives.”

In addition to Louv speaking about nature deficit disorder, more than twenty-five organizations from throughout the region will be present at the Wild Center to offer information, resources and inspiration for families. Through increasing confidence and knowledge in the outdoors, families can learn how easy it is to become reconnected with nature. Activities scheduled throughout the day on the 31-acre Tupper Lake campus will range from fly fishing and nature scavenger hunts to building a fort or just laying back and watching the clouds as they pass in the sky above.

Louv will also officially open The Pines nature play area at the Wild Center. The Pines is a new type of play area designed entirely with nature in mind. Kids are encouraged to explore the play area on their own terms and in their own time. The event will run from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.


Thursday, April 2, 2009

Homegrown Adirondack Paddle Porn

Spring = snowmelt = big rivers = paddle porn. Snowmobilers had their spread in February; now whitewater gets equal time.

Most of these linked videos were made by Lake Placid-based Split Rock Video, which travels widely for fast water and film. This ultimate crash and burn highlight reel features the North Country’s own Black and Moose Rivers alongside the Zambezi and Gauley.

Here is some “classic old school” river running.

A bad swim on the Oswegatchie River.”

An even worse day on the Oswegatchie ends with a broken back.

The conquered-but-still-insane Split Rock Falls on the Boquet River.

Creekin’ on Johns Brook, in Keene, might not look quite as hard, but what the camera doesn’t show is that small streams like these offer few exits.

And lastly, another montage for the rafters: “2007 Hudson River Highlights.”

If you want to know when flows are at optimum levels, gauge data and timing of dam releases in the Hudson and Black River watersheds can be found at the Hudson River-Black River Regulating District Web site.


Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Adirondack Trout And Salmon Season Opener Tips

Tomorrow is the traditional April 1 opening day for New York’s trout and salmon fishing seasons so DEC has issued tips and reminders for anglers heading out on opening day. Early season trout angling in the Adirondack region may be slow due to lingering cold weather and melting snow. Since many Adirondack ponds are likely to remain frozen for opening day, anglers should scout out areas beforehand. Here are DEC’s opening day fishing tips:

Slow presentations using spinners or minnow-imitating lures and, where permitted, live bait, work well in the early season. Those preferring to fly fish will find that similar slow, deep presentations using weighted nymphs and streamers can be effective. Trout and salmon fishing on lakes and ponds is often best immediately after ice-out. Prime areas to fish are those locations that warm the earliest, including tributary mouths and near surface and shallow shoreline areas. Afternoons can be better than mornings during the early season, as the sun’s rays can significantly warm surface waters. Early season anglers are reminded to be extra cautious as high flows, ice and deep snow can make accessing and wading streams particularly hazardous. Remember that ice fishing is prohibited in trout waters, except as noted in the Fishing Regulations Guide.

Several hatchery improvement projects were completed last year. Most significant among these was the completion of an extensive pole-barn complex covering hatchery ponds at the Rome Fish Hatchery to reduce trout predation by birds. It is estimated that this project will save 50,000 to 100,000 fingerling trout annually from predatory birds and will lead to more efficient hatchery operations. Additional hatchery rehabilitation projects are planned for this upcoming year including the rebuilding of the main hatchery building at Rome. Rome Hatchery is one of DEC’s oldest and largest hatcheries, growing and stocking more than 650,000 yearling brown and brook trout annually.

Spring is a busy season for the DEC Hatchery System. From mid-March through mid-June, nine trout and salmon hatcheries stock fish five days a week using 30 state-of-the-art stocking trucks. Stocking of catchable-size trout generally commences in late March and early April in the lower Hudson Valley, Long Island, and western/central New York, and then proceeds to the Catskills and Adirondacks. This year, DEC plans to stock more than 2.3 million legal-size brook, brown, and rainbow trout in 304 lakes and ponds and roughly 3,000 miles of streams across the state. Approximately 100,000 two-year-old brown trout ranging from 12 to 15 inches in length will also be stocked into lakes and streams statewide.

More than 2 million yearling lake trout, steelhead, landlocked salmon, splake and coho salmon also will be stocked by DEC this spring to provide exciting angling opportunities over the next several years. For those who prefer a quieter more remote setting, 325,000 brook trout fingerlings will be stocked in 343 remote lakes and ponds this spring and fall to bolster “backwoods” fishing opportunities. For a complete list of waters planned to be stocked with trout this spring go to www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/30465.html. A listing of waters stocked with all sizes of trout last year can be found at www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/30467.html. In addition to stocked waters, New York State has thousands of miles of wild trout streams that provide excellent fishing opportunities. Regional fisheries offices, which are listed in the Fishing Regulations Guide, can offer specific details about the locations and opportunities offered by these waters.

The general creel limit for brook, brown and rainbow trout is five fish per day and the open season for trout in most New York State waters runs from April 1 through Oct. 15. There are numerous exceptions however, so anglers should review the Fishing Regulations Guide before heading out to their favorite pond or stream.

A New York State fishing license is required for all anglers 16 years of age and older. Those looking to renew licenses can do so at http://www.dec.ny.gov/permits/6101.html or by calling 1-86-NY-DECALS. Fishing licenses can also be purchased from various sporting license outlets located throughout the state (town and county clerks, some major discount stores and many tackle and sporting goods stores).

When purchasing a fishing license, anglers should also consider purchasing a Habitat/Access Stamp, which is available to anyone for $5 from any sporting license issuing agent. Proceeds from sale of this stamp have funded many valuable trout stream access and habitat projects in New York, such as the development of a parking area and footpath on Felts Mill Creek in Jefferson County this past year.

For anglers seeking publicly accessible stream fishing locations, DEC continues to add to its inventory of public fishing rights (PFR) maps that can be downloaded from http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/9924.html.

Prevent the Spread of Invasive Species and Diseases – With the recent discovery of the fish disease Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS) in New York, and an invasive species of algae, didymo, in the Delaware River system and the Batten Kill, anglers are reminded of the important role that they play in preventing the spread of these and other potentially damaging invasive species and fish diseases. Please thoroughly dry equipment, particularly waders and wading shoes, for 48 hours before moving from water to water. If drying is not possible, equipment must be disinfected. One of the easiest and safest ways to disinfect gear is by soaking it for 10 minutes in a cleanser/disinfectant containing the ingredient alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride. This ingredient is found in most common household antiseptic cleansers such as Fantastic, Formula 409 and Spray Nine. Anglers are also encouraged not to use felt-soled waders as they are more apt to transport didymo and other invasives than other forms of wading soles. For more information on invasive species and disinfection procedures, request a copy of the new DEC brochure “Anglers and Boaters: Stop the Spread of Aquatic Invasive Species and Fish Diseases in New York State” from your local DEC office.

New Baitfish Regulations Established to Protect New York Fisheries – Anglers are reminded that a new “Green List” of baitfish species that can be commercially collected and/or sold for fishing in any water body in New York where it is legal to use fish as bait has now been established in regulation. For a complete discussion of these regulations and how to identify these approved baitfish species, download the new brochure “Baitfish of New York State” at www.dec.ny.gov/docs/fish_marine_pdf/baitfishofny.pdf. Personal collection and use of baitfish other than those on the “Green List” is permitted, but only on the water from which they were collected and they may not be transported overland by motorized vehicle. These new regulations have been established to stem the spread of non-native baitfish and dangerous fish diseases in New York State.

Best Bets for Trout Anglers in the Adirondacks:

DEC Region 5 – Adirondack trout streams are icy and there is plenty of snow in the mountains. A relatively mild thaw should clear the ice, but expect high stream flows until the snow pack is reduced. Best bets for early season angling in the southern part of the region are the Batten Kill, Kayaderosseras and Mettawee rivers. Catch-and-release regulations were enacted on the Batten Kill in 2004 from the Eagleville covered bridge to the Vermont state line. Year-round trout fishing is permitted in the catch-and-release section (artificial lures only). The lower two miles of the catch-and-release section will be stocked with two-year-old brown trout some time in May. A creel census of anglers will be conducted in 2009 to assess the fish population and the effectiveness of the catch-and-release regulations.

Many regional streams and rivers will be stocked in April and May. However, due to ice conditions, very few streams are stocked prior to opening day. If possible, yearling brook trout will be stocked in the Chateaugay River in Franklin County by April 1. The Chateaugay, Salmon and St. Regis rivers are scheduled for a creel census in 2009 to assess angler use and the fish population in these rivers. Rainbow trout might also be stocked in the Saranac River within the Village of Saranac Lake prior to April 1. Hundreds of smaller streams contain wild brook and brown trout. Fish slowly, especially if the water is cold, high, and swift. Contact the regional fisheries office for a brochure listing many of the wild trout streams in Region 5.

Remote ponds in the Adirondacks are rarely ice-free until mid-April or later, a pattern that is likely to hold this year. Once waters are ice-free and temperatures rise, surface trolling for salmon and lake trout is a good bet on the larger lakes. Brook trout pond fishing is good from ice-out through May. Anglers are reminded that in many Adirondack ponds the use of fish as bait is prohibited. For a list of these waters check the “Special Regulations by County” section in the Fishing Regulations Guide, or contact the DEC’s Region 5 Fisheries Office in Ray Brook at (518) 897-1333. A variety of leaflets are also available from the regional office including stocking lists for Region 5, top fishing waters, a list of reclaimed trout ponds, and others. For up-to-date information on fishing conditions in the region, anglers can access www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/9219.html on the DEC web site. While browsing the Region 5 Fisheries website, be sure to check out the public fishing rights maps at http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/32610.html for many area rivers. These maps can be downloaded and printed out to provide detailed locations for stream sections with purchased and deeded public rights for angling. Maps are also available from the regional office.

DEC Region 6 (Western Adirondacks)

The opening of trout season expands the region’s trout fishing beyond Lake Ontario and a select set of large lakes, to the rest of the region’s great variety of large and small streams, ponds and lakes. Region 6 includes the Western Adirondacks, Tug Hill, and the Black, Mohawk and St. Lawrence river valleys. The region’s wide diversity of water types provide habitat for everything from small headwater brook trout to large deepwater lake trout.

Stocking proceeds from the Mohawk Valley in mid-April north to St. Lawrence County throughout the month of May. The Oswegatchie River below Cranberry Lake is the only river in the region that is stocked prior to April 1, if conditions allow. The popular two-year-old brown trout stocking occurs in early May on some of the region’s larger, more accessible streams. Worms usually produce the best catches this time of year when the water temperatures are colder and the fish are more sluggish. Spinners and salted minnows also are popular lures. For best results, fish the pools and slow, deep riffles. Fishing in the late afternoon after the water has been warmed by the sun is also productive.

Lake Ontario tributaries should also offer good fishing conditions for steelhead. Try Stony Creek, North and South Sandy Creeks, Lindsey Creek, Skinner Creek and the Black River in Watertown, from the Mill Street dam down to the Village of Dexter. Use egg sacs, single hook spinners, wet flies and streamers.

Coldwater anglers in Region 6 should be aware of a few new regulations that are currently in effect. The catch-and-release section for trout on West Canada Creek in Herkimer and Oneida counties has been extended to the Route 28 bridge (Comstock Bridge) and is open year-round. A three-trout-creel limit with a minimum size limit of 12 inches has been established in Beardsley Lake (Montogomery and Herkimer Counties), Kyser Lake (Fulton and Herkimer Counties), and Stillwater Reservoir (Herkimer County). The catch-and-release season for trout on the West Branch St. Regis River in St. Lawrence County has also been extended to all year.

This year, Region 6 staff will be surveying approximately 25 remote brook trout ponds that contain stocked temiscamie hybrids to assess wild reproduction. This information will help guide future management of this unique resource.


Sunday, March 29, 2009

Budweiser Challenge Ski Race Results

From the better late then never department comes an announcement about the winner of the Budweiser Challenge Ski Race Series this week. The Budweiser Challenge is an eight-race alpine ski racing series featuring many of the areas local businesses. The competitors took two trips each down the NASTAR course on the Lower Valley trail at Whiteface with the lower run times counting.

The Budweiser/Cottage team claimed victory for the second straight year with 424 overall series points. Although winning the eighth and final race by posting 57 points, Scheefers Adirondack Builders placed second in the series with 399 overall points. Coming in third place was Wilkins Insurance Agency at 358 series points. Casa Del Sol came in fourth place in the series with 355 points. Fifth place went to the Wilderness-Willkommen team with 148 overall points.

Winning the Women’s Category 1 Race for Casa Del Sol was Delphine Winter, posting a time of 23.38 seconds. Coming in second for Budweiser/Cottage was Robin Anthony at 24.59. Third place was taken by Niki Olsen, skiing for Scheefers with a 26.44.

Joellen Haviland won the Women’s Category 2 Race, skiing for Scheefers Adirondack Builders, posting a 28.34. Finishing second was Wilkins Insurance Agency’s Rachel Irwin with a 29.23. Third place also went to Scheefers with Lisa Sciacca coming in at 30.11.

Budweiser/Cottage’s Kristie Smith took first in the Women’s Category 3 Race with a 31.77. Wilderness-Willkommen, with their only top three showing for the day, took second with Heike Yost posting a time of 33.16. Debbie Neill with Casa Del Sol took third with 33.40.

Ken Carre, racing for Budweiser/Cottage, posted the fastest time of the day and won the Men’s Category 1 Race at 21.60. Kory Barney, also skiing for Budweiser/Cottage, placed second with a 21.96. Third place went to Scheefers’s Jeff Staves with a 22.18.

The Mens’s Category 2 Race was won by Eric Lanthier, skiing for Scheefers Adirondack Builders, with a time of 24.32. There was a tie for second when Wilkins’s Todd Anthony and Casa’s George Gregory posted times of 24.50. Fourth place went to Mike Stosiek with Wilkins Insurance Agency at 24.67.

Jeff Abbott with Budweiser/Cottage won the Men’s Category 3 Race coming in at 27.04. Scheefers swept second and third place when Bill Dora posted a 27.25 and Ron Morrow a 27.31.

The 2009 Budweiser Challenge Race Series was sponsored by local Budweiser distributor A & M Beverages of Malone. Pictured in the photo are: (left to right) Amy Knappe, Ken Carre, Jay Dewell, Corey Hamelin, Connie Trainer, Kory Barney, Jeff Abbott, Robin Anthony, Karen Tomich, Sue Cameron, Kristie Smith, Denise Bujold and Francisco Braun. In front: Franz Fredericks. Missing from photo: Dave Colleen, Lisa Brown, Jim Sullivan, D.J. O’Neill and Liz Donahue.


Wednesday, March 25, 2009

High Peaks Ranger Wins Alpine Stewardship Award

The Waterman Fund, whose objective is to strengthen stewardship of open summits, exposed ridgelines, and alpine areas of the Northeast, will present the 2009 Guy Waterman Alpine Steward Award to New York State Forest Ranger C. Peter M. Fish this Saturday, March 28th. The award is given each year to a person or organization that has demonstrated a long-term commitment to protecting the physical and spiritual qualities of the northeast’s mountain wilderness.

Pete Fish, a NYS Forest Ranger for 23 years, has served as a ranger in both the Catskills and the Adirondacks, and as an active member of the Adirondack 46ers and Catskill 3500 Club, where Fish has interacted with thousands of hikers on summits and in valleys. Through these organizations, as well as on his own initiative and time, Fish has educated the public about Leave No Trace, backcountry safety, mountain stewardship, and alpine hiking etiquette. He has assisted in training summit stewards since the early days of the High Peaks Summit Steward Program (a partnership of The Nature Conservancy, Adirondack Mountain Club, and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation). Fish has also worked on Ed Ketchledge’s (who received the alpine steward award in 2004) summit restoration efforts in the High Peaks Region. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Adirondack Canoeing Symposium

Canoeists understand the silent satisfaction of the paddle-powered glide. The late John Jerome, who wrote often of water and of the Adirondacks, described the aesthetics:

“[W]e paddled long enough that I began to feel the enticing sphere of energy in the water beside the boat — all the water I could comfortably reach with the paddle — and got the sense that by shaping it, pushing and pulling against it, carving it, molding it, I could make the canoe go where we wanted it to go. Playing with that added fundamentally to the sensual pleasure of the trip.”

If you’d like to increase your paddle pleasure, “obedience classes” for canoes are held each summer in the Adirondacks. Equal parts woodcraft and ballet camp, the Adirondack Freestyle Symposium promises to add “efficiency, grace and fun” to your boating. Registration just opened for this year’s gathering, which will be held July 19-23 at Houghton College’s Star Lake campus. American Canoe Association–certified instructors will teach a variety of levels, from basic travel technique to omering (an off-keel solo method).

Some advanced freestylers add music and perform a routine. But you don’t have to do that.


Monday, March 16, 2009

State Parks 2009 Reservation Numbers Up

More proof that camping remains an inexpensive vacation option came this late last week when the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation announced that advance camping reservations are currently up 6 percent, noting that State Parks are booking record numbers of vacations.

According to the state, there are already 45,300 advance reservations for campsite, cabins and cottages for the 2009 season, a level that is more than 2,650 ahead of the total at same time last year. Advance reservations at state parks campgrounds have been steadily increasing in recent years, with a record 137,000 bookings in 2008.

OPRHP oversees 67 campgrounds with more than 8,000 campsites, 800 cabins and 41 vacation rentals. Reservations are accepted for campsites and cabins, from one day to nine months in advance of the planned arrival date by calling toll free 1-800-456-CAMP or online, www.nysparks.com.


Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Nor-Am Cup Alpine Finals Return to Whiteface

The USSA FIS Nor-Am Cup Alpine Finals will return to Whiteface this weekend, March 12-15. Over 100 athletes are expected to compete in this prestigious event that is a way up-and-coming alpine racers progress to the next season’s World Cup circuit. Every racer who wins a discipline title in the overall season’s events, as well as the runner up, will gain access to the World Cup tour. The Nor-Am competitions have not only seen many young racers move on to World Cup competitions, but many of these skiers have also moved on to compete as Winter Olympic athletes.

The ladies’ super combined and men’s super G will kick off the competition on Thursday, March 12 at 10 am and 1 pm. Men’s super combined and ladies’ super G will be held begin Friday, March 13 at 10 am and 1:15 pm. Men’s giant slalom and women’s slalom can be seen Saturday, March 14 at 9:30 am and 1 pm. The final events held on Sunday, March 15 will be the ladies’ giant slalom and the men’s slalom, beginning their first runs at 9:30 am.

Spectators are invited to come out and watch as some of the finest young Alpine athletes compete on courses that will be set up on the Draper’s Drop and Wilderness trails.

Volunteers are still needed for this event. If interested, contact Brian Fitzgerald at 518.946.7001 or via email at brian@nysef.org. Each email should include individual skiing ability and the volunteer position desired.


Saturday, February 21, 2009

DEC Closes Four Adirondack Campgrounds


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According to a Times-Union story, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation will close four campgrounds within the Blue Line. The four campgrounds are:

•Sharp Bridge in North Hudson on the Schroon River;
•Poke-O-Moonshine in Chesterfield;
•Tioga Point on Raquette Lake;
•Point Comfort on Piseco Lake.

The move is a cost-saving measure, targeting low-traffic campgrounds. None of the 38 remaining DEC Adirondack campgrounds will be affected.

ReserveAmerica, the company handling DEC campground reservations, will contact anyone holding reservations at the four campgrounds to offer alternatives.


Wednesday, February 18, 2009

Skate America Competition Announced For Lake Placid

U.S. Figure Skating has announced that Lake Placid will host 2009 Skate America. The international figure skating event is one of six stops on the ISU Grand Prix of Figure Skating Series. Competition will take place Nov. 12-15, 2009, at the 1980 Rink Herb Brooks Arena. The inaugural Skate America was held in 1979 in Lake Placid and this marks the sixth time the state of New York has hosted the event, and the fourth time it has been held in Lake Placid (1979, ’81, ‘82).

Skate America is an Olympic-style international figure skating event featuring three days of competition in ladies and men’s singles, pairs and ice dancing. The event attracts dozens of world-class figure skaters from all over the globe. Past champions include five-time World and nine-time U.S. champion Michelle Kwan, 2002 Olympic bronze medalist Timothy Goebel, 2002 Olympic pairs champions Jamie Sale and David Pelletier of Canada, 1992 Olympic champion Kristi Yamaguchi and 1984 Olympic champion Scott Hamilton.

Other stops on the ISU Grand Prix of Figure Skating Series each year include Skate Canada, the Cup of China, Trophée Eric Bompard (France), the Cup of Russia and the NHK Trophy (Japan). The Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final takes place each December and rotates among the countries that host the ISU Grand Prix Series events.

2008 Skate America was held at the Everett Events Center in Everett, Wash., where U.S. skaters won medals in all four disciplines and four of the 12 total medals. Johnny Weir, the 2008 World bronze medalist, won the men’s silver, while reigning U.S. champion Evan Lysacek took the men’s bronze. Reigning U.S. pairs champions Keauna McLaughlin and Rockne Brubaker garnered the silver in pairs, and five-time U.S. champions Tanith Belbin and Ben Agosto won ice dancing silver.

The ISU also recently announced that Lake Placid will host an event in the 2009 ISU Junior Grand Prix of Figure Skating Series. The event will be the second of seven in the series and take place Sept. 2-6, 2009.


Thursday, February 5, 2009

Luge World Championships in Lake Placid This Weekend

The 41st Annual FIL Luge World Championships will be held at the Olympic Sports Complex in Lake Placid this weekend, February 6-8 . This is the second time that Lake Placid has hosted this prestigious competition, with the first being in 1983. That competition marked the first time ever that the FIL Luge World Championships were held outside of Europe. The 2009 World Championships features athletes from over 20 countries competing in the three disciplines of men’s singles, women’s singles, and doubles luge. This is the last major sliding event for the lugers leading up to the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, Canada.

The 41st Annual FIL Luge World Championships begin Friday, February 6, with the doubles competition at 10 AM. The women’s competition follows at 1 PM. Saturday, February 7, features the men’s races beginning at noon. The Lake Placid World Fest party starts at 3 PM and runs until 6:30 PM at the Mirror Lake Beach. This free community festival will have live music, food vendors, games, a kids’ area, fireworks and more! The final event of the World Championships is the team relay competition on Sunday, February 8. The team relay consists of a men’s singles slider, a women’s singles slider, and a doubles sled from each country, with the lowest combined time of all three disciplines winning.

Two-time defending Olympic Champion and five-time World Champion Armin Zöggeler currently leads the men’s World Cup overall field after seven races with 601 points. The Italian has won four of those seven races, the most recent World Cup race in Altenberg. Germany’s David Möller sits in second place with 525 points, followed by teammate Jan Eichhorn with 430 points.

Defending 2008 World Champion Felix Loch – the youngest luge world champion ever at the age of 18 – is currently in sixth place in the standings. The young German missed the first three races of the season after being injured during a training session in Whistler, British Columbia. 2002 American Olympian Bengt Walden is in 14th position in the standings while teammate Tony Benshoof is still completing extensive physical therapy and hopes to make his return to the ice on his home track during the World Championships.

The top three positions in the World Cup standings for the women are claimed by the Germans. Tatjana Hüfner, the reigning World Champion, leads the field with 670 points, having won four races so far this season. Teammate Natalie Geisenberger sits in second place with two wins on the season and 600 points. Anke Wischnewski has 462 points to take third. American Erin Hamlin is currently ranked sixth overall, with 268 points.

The Italian doubles team of Chistian Oberstoltz and Patric Gruber is leading the World Cup standings with 580 points. Oberstoltz and Gruber have won four races this season and have a 96-point lead over the 2002 Olympic gold medal team of Patric Leitner and Alexander Resch of Germany. Austrian brothers and 2006 Olympic Champions Wolfgang and Andreas Linger are just 14 points back at 474 points in third place. Olympians Mark Grimmette and Brian Martin of the United States have 268 points, which puts them in sixth place in the standings heading into the World Championships.

Tickets for the 41st FIL World Championships are on sale now. Single day tickets are $9 for adults and $7 for juniors (ages 7-12) and seniors (65 and over). Guests may purchase a Silver Pass good for all three days for just $19. Tickets may be purchased at the Olympic Center Box Office in person or by phone (518) 523-3330, online, or at any area Price Chopper store. Visit the ORDA Store on Main Street in Lake Placid to pick up FREE tickets, while supplies last. Visit www.lakeplacid2009.com for all ticket packages and more event information.


Saturday, January 17, 2009

Freestyle World Cup Tour This Weekend in LP

The FIS Freestyle World Cup Tour will come to Whiteface / Lake Placid this weekend, January 18-19. The event features a nighttime aerials competition on Sunday evening at the Olympic Jumping Complex, and for the first time ever on the East Coast, a world cup competition in ski cross at Whiteface.

The event kicks off with the men’s and women’s ski cross qualifications Sunday, January 18 on the Lower Valley trail at Whiteface. The women begin with qualifications at 9:45 AM with the men following at 12:20 PM. Ski cross debuted on the World Cup Tour last year, and this is its inaugural event at Whiteface. Many of the athletes competing are looking for a spot on the Olympic team as ski cross was added to the roster of events for the 2010 Vancouver Games. Ski cross consists of four freestyle skiers going down the run at once, and has course features similar to snowboard cross such as rollers, banked curves and jumps.

The aerialists take flight starting at 1:30 PM with the women’s qualifications at the Olympic Jumping Complex. The men follow suit with their own qualifications at 5:15 PM. The Freestyle Funk Fest gets the party started at 6 PM with live music from Peter Price and Moon Boot Lover. The top 12 women and men from qualifications advance to the finals, slated to begin at 7:40 PM.

The ski cross athletes get their chance to win gold on Monday, January 19 at 11 AM with the men’s and women’s skier cross finals at Whiteface.

Prior to the competitions, fans have a chance to meet U.S. Ski Team members at Whiteface on Saturday, January 17. From 12 PM – 1:30 PM is the freestyle athlete autograph signing session and the “U.S. Ski Team – We Ski & Snowboard Challenge.” Skiers and riders may enter to win a chance to show off their Wii skills against the freestylers. Prizes will be awarded to the first, second, and third place finishers. Plus, the Whiteface Cash Cube will be on hand for even more fun.

Daron Rahlves, the most successful U.S. male downhill skier, retired after 13 years on the U.S. Alpine Ski Team following the 2006 Olympic season. He wanted to continue skiing, and has since made the transition into the ski cross world. Four-time Olympian and six-time U.S. Champion Casey Puckett retired from the U.S. Alpine Ski Team in 2002. He quickly set his sights on ski cross and has become a superstar of the newest Olympic sport after winning X Games gold and dominating the Ski Tour and Jeep King of the Mountain. Joining them is former speed skier Jake Fiala.

Two-Time Olympian Jeret Peterson leads the U.S. aerial contingent. Along with fellow Olympians Emily Cook and Ryan St. Onge as well as teammate Scotty Bahrke, these athletes hope to secure the top spots in Lake Placid.

This is the second stop on the World Cup Tour for the aerialists and the fourth for skier cross. Leading the men’s aerial field is Alexei Grishin from Belarus, followed by China’s Ke Li and Canadian Warren Shouldice. Lydia Lassila of Australia tops the women’s field, followed by China’s Shanshan Zhao and Canada’s Veronika Bauer.

Hedda Bernsten of Norway sits at the top of the women’s ski cross field with 145 points. France’s Ophelie David is second with 130 points while Katharina Gutensohn of Austria is third with 130 points.

Austrian Andreas Matt leads the men’s ski cross standings with 180 points. Michael Schmid of Switzerland sits in second with 140 points, followed by Canadian Christopher Delbosco, who has 116 points.

Daily tickets for the aerials training, qualifications and finals at the Olympic Jumping Complex are $14 for adults, $8 for juniors/seniors. Spectators may view the ski cross competition at Whiteface from the base lodge for free. Those wanting to watch from alongside the course may purchase a lift ticket.

More information on the FIS World Cup Freestyle Tour can be found at http://www.orda.org/newsite/events/worldcups/200809/freestyle/index.php.


Wednesday, January 7, 2009

Whiteface’s Third Peak Lookout Mountain Opens Thurs

Lookout Mountain, Whiteface’s third peak, is set for its Grand Opening on Thursday, January 8, at 1 PM. [UPDATE: Due to the weather conditions at Whiteface this will take place 11 AM, Friday, January 9]. The new peak will include three new trails beginning with The Wilmington Trail. This run is a 2.5-mile long intermediate cruiser overlooking the Wilmington Wild Forest. Lookout Mountain’s other two trails are expert runs called Lookout Below and Hoyt’s High. Lookout Below is about 1/5 of a mile long. Hoyt’s High was named in honor of Whiteface veteran ski patroller Jim Hoyt, Sr. He has been employed at Whiteface for over 50 years. This trail has a long and consistent expert pitch over its 4,182-feet length. Both runs will be opened later this winter.

The official ribbon cutting ceremony at 1 PM will include ORDA Chairman Joe Martens, ORDA Board Members Ed Weibrecht and Serge Lussi as well as Wilmington Town Supervisor Randy Preston. Following the on-mountain grand opening activities, a special dedication to the Whiteface Region Visitors Bureau members will be made at 2 PM in the Lookout Café, located within the main base lodge. Complimentary hot chocolate will be served.

For up-to-date trail conditions and mountain activities, go to www.whiteface.com. For more information on the Olympic venues and events, and for web cams from five locations, visit www.whitefacelakeplacid.com.


Monday, December 29, 2008

Nature Conservancy, State Finalize Domtar Lands

The Domtar land purchase – now known as Sable Highlands and located in Franklin and Clinton Counties near Lyon Mountain – has been finalized with the protection of 104,000 acres, an area seven times the size of Manhattan. New York State purchased a conservation easement from the Lyme Timber Company on December 24, 2008 and that transaction ended four years of efforts to preserve the acreage once owned by Domtar Industries in the northeastern corner of the Adirondacks.

In addition to the continuation of sustainable forestry, the conservation easement also includes access to nearly 30,000 acres that have been off-limits to the public for decades, including Sugarloaf Mountain, the Norton and Plumadore Ranges, and Barnes, Grass, Figure Eight, and Fish Hole Ponds. Combined with the 20,000 acres of new state lands, the public now has access to about 50,000 acres in a part of the park that has had limited opportunities for public recreation in the past. The Sable Highlands includes 220 miles of permanent and seasonal streams, 2,600 acres of wetlands, and 20 lakes and ponds in the St. Lawrence and Lake Champlain drainages. Among the lands protected in the Domtar deal are Lyon Mountain (14,400-acre habitat for Bicknell’s thrush), Ellenburg Mountain (1,700-acre tract of roadless forest that adjoining 7,100 acres of Forest Preserve lands), Whistle Pond / Keniston Meadows (920-acre tract adjoining existing state Forest Preserve), and East Chazy Lake.

In December of 2004, Domtar sold all of its Adirondack holdings in Clinton and Franklin Counties to the Lyme Timber Company and The Nature Conservancy. Working in partnership with Lyme, the Conservancy, and local community leaders, New York State has now fulfilled an agreement to secure the permanent protection of those properties.

A few months ago, the state made an outright purchase of 20,000 acres as new public lands from The Nature Conservancy. The purchases help foster the Adirondack Park’s role as a conservation model for the world and is another important investment in the local forest products industry. Last week, the state purchased a conservation easement to protect 84,000 acres owned by Lyme Timber. This “working forest” easement promotes sustainable forest management and timber harvesting, restricts residential development and subdivision, and creates a balance of public recreational access and continued private recreational leasing on the property.

The recent state expenditures were previously budgeted to the Environmental Protection Fund from money provided primarily from a real estate transfer tax. Private contribution to The Nature Conservancy’s Sable Highlands Campaign since 2004 totaled some $4 million and also helped to offset the overall costs of conservation.