Monday, August 9, 2021

Amazing convergence of Adirondack art, music and literature this Friday

Saranac Lake ArtWorks announces a convergence of Adirondack “arts” on Friday August 13th: Literary, Fine Art, & Music. BluSeed Studios starts the night with a book reading by Christopher Shaw at 6 pm. (https://www.bluseedstudios.org/event/153626/the-power-line-reading-by-chris-shaw). The author will read from “The Powerline” – which the Schenectady Daily Gazette website  described as “taking readers on a journey to Lake Aurora and Saranac Lake and through time, going back to the years following World War I. It weaves together fictionalized memories of longtime residents with well-known regional landmarks and highlights how much the area has changed.” The reading starts at 6 pm, the admission fee is $10/person, and there will be time for questions and answers.

In the BluSeed gallery space, “Three Perspectives” is on display. (https://www.bluseedstudios.org/collections/164032). It is a special exhibit by 3 veteran Saranac Lake area Adirondack artists: pastel painter Diane Leifheit, plein air oil painter Nancy Brossard, and oil painter Stephen Horne.

Then with just a 15 minute drive to Paul Smiths, the VIC is hosting a 7 pm concert by well known Adirondack performers. (https://pscvic.square.site/product/concert-dan-duggan-and-peggy-lynn-8-13-21-7-8pm-/589?cp=true&sa=false&sbp=false&q=false&category_id=15). It’s a little tight and you might miss part of the beginning – but well worth it. From the VIC email newsletter, “Join regional treasures, Dan Duggan and Peggy Lynn, when they take the VIC stage. Come out for an evening of songs, stories and laughs”. Admission is $10/person.

This is an amazing convergence of Adirondack art, music and literature that rarely happens all on one night and for just $20 total.


Monday, August 9, 2021

Report Your Turkey Sightings This August

wild turkeysWhile you are exploring the forests and fields around your home or driving through the state’s beautiful landscapes this summer, be sure to keep an eye out for wild turkeys.

DEC uses reported observations of wild turkeys to track changes in abundance and productivity (number of poults produced per adult hen) over time and in different parts of the state. It also helps forecast hunting prospects for the coming fall season and for subsequent spring seasons. Submit your observations online. To see results from previous summer surveys, please visit DEC’s website.

Photo courtesy of G. Ellmers


Sunday, August 8, 2021

Remembering Irene, 10 years later: The Flooding of Styles Brook

Ten years ago Tropical Storm Irene’s torrential rains devastated the Ausable River Watershed. I tell my story of the first day living near one of its tributaries.

During the afternoon of August 28, 2011, we watched a ditch uphill from our house become a ranging stream on our property that borders Styles Brook. The gravel on our driveway washed away. It was not until our closest neighbor from Highland Farm called late afternoon that we realized the seriousness of the rain storm from Tropical Storm Irene. Our neighbor asked if we wanted to stay at their house after informing us that a nearby bridge had just succumbed to the roaring waters of Styles Brook.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 8, 2021

Oak wilt: No laughing matter

leaf and whole tree symptoms of oak wilt in a red oak treeIt’s normal to tune out all the Chicken Littles (such as yours truly) who run around squawking about this or that invasive forest pest or disease that pose a threat to trees. I mean, how many times can the sky fall, anyway? But the real danger is when we feel so overwhelmed that we throw up our hands. Thinking we can’t make a difference could result in more harm to forests than the pests themselves.

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Sunday, August 8, 2021

Weekly news round up

A collection of interesting reads:

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Saturday, August 7, 2021

Spirit of Generosity: Investing in Our Food Systems

north country creamery

Steven Googin and Ashlee Kleinhammer of North Country Creamery in Keeseville. Erika Bailey photo, provided by Adirondack Foundation

It started with Emergency Food Packages spearheaded by AdkAction. These packages, filled with local food  –  including organic yogurt, apples, granola, carrots, greens, eggs, and more  –  were assembled at Hub on the Hill in Essex and delivered to the doorsteps of people who were experiencing economic hardship as far away as Tupper Lake and Malone. The packages came at a time when local farmers were losing wholesale business revenue as schools and restaurants paused for health and safety reasons.The quantities needed for the packages compensated for these losses and helped to keep farmers in business.

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Saturday, August 7, 2021

MAKE IT: Blueberry Refrigerator Jam

blueberry jam

I love blueberries. I love blueberry jam. As such, I love to eat blueberry jam on toast (especially sourdough!), drizzled on fruit, as a topping for sorbet, or by the (very large) spoonful. When making any sort of jam, it is important to have a good quality fruit. When the blueberries are amazing, the blueberry jam will also be amazing! This jam will keep for up to three weeks in the refrigerator.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound fresh blueberries
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar OR ½ cup agave nectar or honey
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest (optional)

Directions

  1. Combine blueberries, sugar, lime juice, and lime zest in a medium saucepot. Bring the mixture to boil over medium-high heat, then reduce heat to medium.
  2. Let the jam cook for 15-25 minutes until the blueberries have broken down and the mixture has thickened.
  3. Transfer cooked jam into sterilized glass jars. Let the jam cool uncovered at room temperature. Cover jars and keep jam in refrigerator for up to three weeks. Enjoy!

 


Saturday, August 7, 2021

Clarkson, Clinton Community College partner on workforce preparedness

clinton community college logoNumerous members of the regional manufacturing and workforce  development communities joined elected representatives who came together in Plattsburgh recently for a MOU signing between Clarkson University and Clinton Community College to show their support for the  partnership that supports advanced manufacturing, engineering and workforce training used across the  North Country and New York State.  

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Friday, August 6, 2021

A tagged Monarch Butterfly from Paul Smith’s found in Mexico

monarch butterflyOn a warm sunny day in late September the Monarch butterflies at the Paul Smith’s College Visitors Interpretive Center (VIC) readied for their journey to Mexico. In our butterfly house we tag monarchs so they can be tracked on their journey south. They are tagged with small stickers and given individual numbers. This year one very special Monarch from our butterfly house, number AAMZ679, was found in El Rosario, Mexico! This means this Monarch butterfly traveled 3,000 miles from the Butterfly House to reach El Rosario!

» Continue Reading.


Friday, August 6, 2021

Recreation Highlight: Outdoor Accessibility Day at John Dillon Park

john dillon

Join DEC this Sunday for Outdoor Accessibility Day (OAD) at John Dillon Park, located at 2150 Tupper Road, Long Lake, NY. We are looking forward to a day full of activities and opportunities to learn about accessibility in the outdoors.

Experience boat rides, fishing clinics, nature walks, campfire cooking, and more. Visitors are encouraged to explore the trails and pack a lunch to enjoy in one of the many picnic areas around the park.

Register for Outdoor Accessibility Day at John Dillon Park. For more information, call John Dillon Park at (518) 524-6226.


Friday, August 6, 2021

Outdoor conditions (8/6): Keene paving project on Route 73

outdoor conditions logoThe following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

Climbing Access: As of Tuesday, August 3, 2021, all routes on Potash Mountain are open. There are no longer any active climbing restrictions in the East/Central Adirondacks.

Sable Highlands: The campsite at Saranac River PUA and the two campsites on Mullins Road are closed for rehabilitation through August 13. Campsites 1 and 2 at the Barnes Pond PUA will remain open.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, August 6, 2021

Latest news headlines

Here’s a look at news from around the Adirondacks this week:

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 5, 2021

Business ownership: the key to retaining a young population?

By Dana Bamford, ANCA 2021 Summer Fellow

Having grown up in suburban Boston, it was a real change moving to northern New York.

Not because of the swarming Yankees and Mets fans and not even because of the dreaded winters —  those I’ve had my fair share of in Boston. The biggest change for me was the shift to a more rural lifestyle.

Before moving up to the Adirondacks and working with ANCA this summer, I attended Colgate University, which is located in a pretty isolated location. At Colgate, I got used to driving an hour to the closest Target, or thirty minutes to the best ice cream spot. Thirty minutes to the nearest gas station, however, came as quite the shock despite my rural-life grace period at school.

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Thursday, August 5, 2021

Tropical Storm Irene 10th Anniversary Events

Adirondak Loj Road closed after Tropical Storm Irene

On August 28, 2011, Tropical Storm Irene devastated the Ausable River watershed. The following activities are planned to commemorate this time, to acknowledge the force of nature, and to honor the coming together of the communities affected. These in-person events are open to all following CDC guidelines.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 5, 2021

Follow the discussion on Lake George

lake georgeRecently, the Explorer’s Gwendolyn Craig reported that the Lake George Park Commission had assembled a committee to consider the effects of septic systems on the lake’s water, and to discuss whether or how to regulate them. At its meeting today, the commission announced that Essex and Washington counties had joined Warren County on the committee, providing representation for all lands around the lake.

This question of septics and other possible sources of nutrient pollution in the “Queen of American Lakes” is a topic in which the Explorer has invested a considerable amount of reporting, as wastewater pollution is emerging as a top priority in the Adirondacks. We’ll continue following it and explaining how it may affect homeowners, vacationers and the environment. In the meantime, this new committee will meet today, Aug. 5, and you can find information for following that discussion online by clicking this link.

Lake George photo from the Almanack archive

This first appeared in the Explorer’s weekly “Water Line” newsletter. Click here to subscribe.