Tuesday, January 26, 2021

What’s in the state budget for the Adirondacks?

Satellite view of the Adirondacks with blue line superimposed courtesy Adirondack WildFollowing Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s State of the State presentations, last week we learned about his 2022 proposed budget. Cuomo was largely asking the federal government to give the state more money, citing the coronavirus pandemic. New York is currently almost $15 billion in the hole.

But after Cuomo talked, some budget documents were released with a better idea of what next year could look like.

I’ll be delving into those in a bit more detail, but overall, we found that Cuomo plans to keep intact the $300 million Environmental Protection Fund, an important source of money for Adirondacks projects. The state Department of Environmental Conservation could be getting some new staff members, but it looks like they will be focused on implementing the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act. Some funding was renewed for Essex County to address overuse in the High Peaks, and $250,000 was renewed for the Adirondack Diversity Initiative.

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Tuesday, January 26, 2021

Poetry:  And So A New Story Begins…

 And So A New Story Begins…
..And now it starts. Still,
Yet, it turns toward better days,
Both past and to come.
Victory is clear.
It beckons our good people,
To remember love,
Remember honor,
Remember hope, remember,
Who they really are.
Hearts lighten today,
And faces upturn once more.
We stand together.
All feels right again,
A reckoning of the soul.
Now freedom sings out,
Still, freedom sings out,
And, a new story begins.

Monday, January 25, 2021

Gratitude for Partnerships

partnership iconBy Danielle Delaini, Adirondack North Country Association

We at ANCA are struggling (as we imagine many of you are ) to comprehend, process and heal from the deep divisions that are happening in the U.S. today. Sometimes it can feel like our work is such a small drop in a large ocean of economic and social troubles flooding our region and our country. It can feel isolating. It can feel insurmountable.

Of course, it is nothing compared to the weight that minoritized individuals feel in experiencing the same burnt, torn landscape of our nation in this moment.

We recommit ourselves everyday to overcome those feelings and continually move forward — to work at a systems level in order to make outsized impact from a modestly sized organization.

Committing to that hope is possible because we never stand alone.

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Monday, January 25, 2021

Adirondack survey seeks feedback from potential residents

survey photoThe Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) recently partnered with Warren County Economic Development Corporation (EDC) to commission a survey to determine the desire for potential new year-round residents to the Adirondacks. Camoin 310 of Saratoga Springs designed the survey and will compile the results. Click here for the survey link.

(UPDATE on 2/1/21: The survey is closed. Stay tuned for future updates on the results.)

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Monday, January 25, 2021

DEC Encourages New York Anglers to Try Ice Fishing

ice fishingNew Yorkers to get outside this winter and safely enjoy ice fishing this season. There must be at least four inches of solid clear ice for anglers who wish to access the ice on foot. The thickness of ice can vary on waterbodies, and even within the same waterbody. If you wish to walk on ice, be cautious of areas moving water and areas around boat docks and houses where bubblers could potentially be installed to prevent the formation of ice.

Testing the ice  can be done with an auger or spud bar at various spots, and for extra safety, make sure you aren’t alone. Local bait and tackle shops are a good resource to find safe ice and learn where other ice-anglers are going.

Gov. Andrew Guomo’s NY Open for Fishing and Hunting initiative has designated a free fishing weekend on February 13-14. A fishing license is not required during the designated weekend, making it a great opportunity to get out on the ice and give ice fishing a try. Beginners may want to check out some resources available on the DEC’s ice fishing webpage.


Sunday, January 24, 2021

Hunger: A Growing Problem During the Pandemic 

food bankFood Security. It’s a term we hear a lot these days. But defining food security can be difficult. There are literally hundreds of definitions and an even greater number of food security indicators. As defined by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Economic Research Service (ERS), food security is “access by all people at all times to enough food for an active, healthy life.” More precise definitions include references to food preferences, dietary needs, safety, etc.

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Sunday, January 24, 2021

Where is the north country?

I was thinking it might be fun to try a new discussion thread each week. To get the ball rolling I was digging through the Almanack archive and came across this post from 2013 titled “Where Exactly is the North Country?”, written by Herb Hallas.

In his essay, Hallas traces the origin of the term North Country back to “the author, Irving Bacheller, when his novel, Eben Holden: A Tale of the North Country, became a literary sensation in 1900. Bacheller was born in Pierrepont, St. Lawrence County, NY in 1859 and graduated from St. Lawrence University in 1882. Two years later, he founded the first U.S. newspaper syndicate and introduced the writing of Stephen Crane, Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Conan Doyle and Joseph Conrad to American readers. Bacheller retired from newspaper work in 1900 to concentrate on writing novels. Eben Holden: A Tale of the North Country was his fourth novel and it became a runaway best seller.”

While Bacheller’s “North Country” referred to St. Lawrence County, Hallas cites five varying versions of what counties and places make up the North Country.

What are your thoughts? What comes to mind for you when hearing “North Country”? Does the North Country have a distinct identity apart from the Adirondacks or are the two forever linked together?

Image from NYS Empire State Development


Sunday, January 24, 2021

Weekly news round up

A collection of interesting reads:

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Saturday, January 23, 2021

Long Lake celebrates scaled-down winter carnival

Long Lake ice sculptureOn Saturday, January 16, the Long Lake 19th Annual Winter Carnival saw major changes to the line-up and was able to host a modified version renamed Winter Carnival “Lite.”

The only coordinated event was the Cardboard Sled Races which were held with Covid-19 protocols in place. All participants and spectators had to register in advance for a maximum of 50 and there was no on-site registration.  Everyone wore masks and kept a minimum of six feet between racers and families.

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Saturday, January 23, 2021

DEC Reminder – Seeking Comments for Proposed Trout Stream Fishing Regulations

NYS DEC has announced that there is still time to comment on the potential fishing regulations for inland trout streams in New York State. Those interested in posting comment can find the text of regulations proposed, as well as instructions for submitting comments on the DEC’s website. Public comments on proposed rule changes will be accepted until January 25.

If you need a quick reminder, the DEC is proposing an amendment to Trout Stream Sportfishing Regulations by creating new statewide regulations, 4 regulation categories, and a catch and release season from October 15th through March 31st.

 


Saturday, January 23, 2021

MAKE IT: Anadama Molasses Bread

Anadama Bread

This old-fashioned recipe is an easy way to make a delicious loaf of yeast bread. I usually use whole-wheat flour and blackstrap molasses, but you can use whatever wheat flour and molasses you have on hand (if you successfully substitute other types of flour for the wheat, please let me know!). It does not require a lot of kneading, and will make your kitchen smell amazing when it bakes.

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Friday, January 22, 2021

Adirondack Communities: Workforce Training

Adirondack Communities logoAt the end of an eight-week long course on manufacturing and career building at Clinton Community College a few years ago, there was a sense of nervous anticipation as the seven participants considered  their next steps and prepared to meet with prospective employers at an informal job fair the following  day. One of the students had driven from Westport every day for two months to attend the four-hour  class. Another participant had commuted from Malone and was now considering moving to Plattsburgh if he was able to find employment. Another student, who spoke openly about the barriers to employment because of a past criminal record, said he hoped the class and OSHA certification would lead to a good job and a better future.  

The Assembling Industry: Manufacturing & Education class or AIME, launched in 2010, is a partnership  between ETS Staffing and Recruiting, Clinton Community College’s Institute for Advanced  Manufacturing, and CV-TEC. The initiative is in part an attempt to bridge the gap between a flourishing  manufacturing sector in the area and a shortage of employees heightened by historically low  unemployment rates. According to Deb Cleary, President and CEO of ETS, on any given day there are some 130 to 150 unfilled manufacturing jobs in the Plattsburgh region. 

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Friday, January 22, 2021

Recreation Highlight: Winter Tracking

tracksNow is a great time to search for winter tracks (PDF) or other animal signs visible in the snow. It can be fun to be a detective and figure out what animals have been walking through your yard or across a trail. Here are a few tips to get you started:

  • Snow conditions can make a difference in a track’s appearance—wet snow captures a print better than powdery snow.
  • Members in the dog family (coyote, fox, or dogs) will usually leave claw prints above the toes, while the cat family (bobcat, housecat) will not. You should see four toes on both front and back feet for both families.
  • Rodents, such as squirrels, chipmunks, mice, muskrats, and voles, usually have four toes on the front feet and five on the back. Claws may or may not be seen.
  • Bring a notebook, camera, or field guide with you.
  • Sometimes an animal’s droppings, or scat, can help you identify it—a rabbit’s looks like small balls of sawdust.

Find out more in the Become a Winter Wildlife Detective (PDF) issue of Conservationist for Kids.

In case you missed it, check out the recent Winter Wildlife Tracks and Scat Identification Video on DEC’s Facebook page.

Photo by Sandy Van Vranken.


Friday, January 22, 2021

Outdoor Conditions (1/22): Wind chill warning, unstable snow pack for high peaks

outdoor conditions logoThe following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

High Peaks Wilderness:

  • Weekend Weather Warning: There is an extreme wind chill warning for Friday night into much of Saturday at elevation. Additional snowfall is also forecast. Check the National Weather Service Northern Adirondacks and Southern Adirondacks Mountain Point Forecasts for selected summits.
  • Unstable Snowpack: There have been several reports of unstable snowpack on open slopes. Practice safe travel when crossing exposed areas.
  • Colden Caretaker Report 01/20/21: Two feet three inches of snow have accumulated at the Colden Caretaker cabin. Three to four feet of snow have accumulated on summits. Snowshoes are needed on all trails, starting at parking lots. Skiing is in, including the ski trail, South Meadows Road and the trail to the Flowed Lands. Both Avalanche Lake and Lake Colden are frozen.

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Friday, January 22, 2021

Latest news headlines

Here’s a look at news from around the Adirondacks this week:

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