Tuesday, May 24, 2022

State finalizes laws to decrease e-waste, foam packaging

fpolystyrene foam ban

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner has announced the finalization of two regulations that will help reduce waste going to landfills. The adoption of requirements to reduce electronic waste (e-waste) and enacting the Expanded Polystyrene Foam Container and Loose Fill Packaging Ban will promote recycling and help prevent foam litter from affecting communities.

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Tuesday, May 24, 2022

Illusionist Leon Etienne returns to The Strand Theatre for live Magic Rocks! performances Memorial Day Weekend

Illusionist Leon Etienne has sold out venues all over the world with performances of his interactive, energetic, family-friendly show, Magic Rocks! Now break out the rock music and leather attire because Etienne is returning to Central New York with his world-renowned show to continue his support for the Old Forge community by performing a series of shows at The Strand Theatre. The performance will include some old favorites and brand new, never-before-seen illusions sure to leave attendees asking… “How did he DO that?!”

“We had such an awesome time last summer at The Strand that we had to return for more,” Leon Etienne said. “We’re so excited to be back in Old Forge this summer with your favorite illusions and some new tricks up our sleeves!”

As seen on America’s Got Talent, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Penn & Teller Fool Us, and more, Etienne has toured the world with his critically-acclaimed hit show, Magic Rocks! The 70-minute, one-of-a-kind, 100-percent interactive comedy and magic show is sure to bring joy, wonder, laughter, and whimsy during a time when the world certainly needs it. Etienne and his lead assistant, Chelsea LaCongo, will be performing at The Strand Theatre in Old Forge on Memorial Day Weekend, Saturday and Sunday, May 28 and 29 at 8 p.m.  Tickets are available for $25 per person. Visit OldForgeMagic.com for additional showtimes and to purchase tickets.

Originally opening in 1923, The Strand Theatre has played a fundamental role in Adirondack tourism for nearly 100 years. From its iconic marquee to the old-fashioned popcorn machine, many vintage elements still reside in The Strand Theatre, making supporters feel transported in time the moment they step foot inside the theatre.

The Covid-19 pandemic forced the Old Forge staple to temporarily close and it is still recovering from losses.

“It’s been a tough time for business owners, but things are starting to look up!” Etienne said. “We want to continue to give back to The Strand and the Old Forge community. What better way to give back than returning with new illusions and more fun?”

For more information on the above events, please contact: Natasha Kirkland of The Marketing Firm at 315.796.8059 or [email protected] or Tony Bartolotti of The Marketing Firm at 315.796.8059 or [email protected]

Photo at top provided by Leon Etienne.


Monday, May 23, 2022

State, local partners announce outdoor rec initiatives in Adirondacks, Catskills

adirondacks hiker shuttleNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos joined state and local community leaders to announce initiatives planned for the 2022 outdoor recreation season to protect public safety and promote sustainable recreation in the Adirondack and Catskill Forest Preserve. Many of these actions, bolstered by $8 million from the State Environmental Protection Fund specifically for Adirondack and Catskill visitor safety and wilderness protection in the recently enacted 2022-23 State Budget, support a comprehensive strategy to improve safety, sustainability, and equitable access of those enjoying the outdoors during the upcoming warm weather months.

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Monday, May 23, 2022

The mountains are calling …

owls head mountain

“Mountains are our crystal ball,” John All, scientist and mountaineer writes in Icefall. “Understand them, and you get a glimpse of the planet’s future.”

All almost lost his life during an expedition to understand climate change in the world’s most remote places, the subject of his book, a source for my current research into the high peaks of the Adirondacks. He risks everything to tell stories of resilience and human adaptation.

These qualities of courage and perseverance are alive and well in those who steward the High Peaks Wilderness, subjects of my upcoming feature which will explore the history of protection for alpine ecosystems. Rare plant species persist after nearly becoming extinct because of foresight and dedication on behalf of organizations like the Adirondack Mountain Club. What lessons have we learned from past successes in protecting threatened species in unique ecosystems and how might we apply them to new climate challenges? This is what I’ll be looking to understand in the coming month.

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Monday, May 23, 2022

Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism Receives New York State Tourism Industry Association Excellence Awards

The Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) has received two awards from the New York State Tourism Industry Association (NYSTIA).

The awards were announced on May 5, in observance of National Travel and Tourism Week, recognizing outstanding initiatives and achievements of New York state’s destination marketing organizations, attractions, and other tourism-related businesses. Categories included marketing campaigns, destination management initiatives, location stewardship, innovation and leadership.

The NYSTIA “Economic Development & Destination Improvement” award recognized ROOST for its transition from a destination marketing organization (DMO) to a destination marketing and management organization (DMMO). “The distinction is significant,” according to James McKenna, CEO of ROOST.  “Historically, the role of organizations like ROOST has simply been to boost the economic impact of tourism for the region. While ROOST continues to do that, it is also focused on its partnerships with local governments, businesses, organizations and community members. These partnerships help to ensure that we develop and support initiatives that enhance the lives of community residents while contributing positively to tourism infrastructure and the tourism economy. ROOST and its partners have forged this partnership to encourage sustainability of the region – economically, socially and environmentally.”

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Monday, May 23, 2022

The Hyde Collection Announces 31st Annual High School Juried Art Show & Showcases Winners

Best of Show: Kyla McByrne, Queensbury High School, “Sticky Situation,” acrylic painting.

The Hyde Collection is excited to announce its 31st Annual High School Juried Art Show showcasing the artistic talent of young artists from Warren, Washington, Saratoga, Hamilton, and Essex counties. This year’s high school artists employ diverse media, including drawing, painting, digital illustration, photography, jewelry, sculpture, and ceramics. The Hyde Collection is honored to
support promising young artists and students in the capital region.

“The High School Juried Art Show is an amazing opportunity for area high school student artists to learn and experience the finer points of a professional competitive exhibition process. As one of the nation’s longest-running high school juried shows, we are proud to continue providing this opportunity for our region’s amazing young artists,” said The Hyde Collection’s Director of Curatorial Affairs, Jonathan Canning.

In an extensive jurying process, judges selected 100 pieces of artwork for the exhibition from 443 submissions from 182 students in 13 schools. The entries were judged by a panel of jurors featuring three professional artists from our region: Anne Diggory, Doretta Miller, and Victoria van der Lann, each of whom has a work in The Hyde’s permanent collection.

Winners were announced May 7 at the opening reception, attended by 170 people in The Helen Froehlich Auditorium. Awards were given to the artwork in categories of Best of Show, Curator’s Award, Juror’s Awards, and Honorable Mentions. The Visitor’s Choice Award will be awarded at the conclusion of the exhibition. All winners received a $250 scholarship for an art class at SUNY Adirondack and every student artist received a prize pack.

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Sunday, May 22, 2022

Found an injured bird? Here’s how to help

baby bird

Few things are more heartbreaking than encountering an injured, sick, or orphaned bird (adult or chick) or other wild animal. It is in our human nature to want to help, but how do we make sure we do more good than harm? Follow these important guidelines.

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Sunday, May 22, 2022

Save the Date: Great Camp Sagamore’s Annual Gala & Benefit for Historic Preservation on Aug. 6

Great Camp Sagamore staff are excited to welcome the community back, in-person, on August 6, 2022 for their Annual Gala & Benefit for Historic Preservation. Join the festivities for an evening of great food, exciting live & silent auctions, and even better company in the heart of Forever Wild.

This year staff are celebrating the many dedicated members of the community – visitors, volunteers, donors, artisans, musicians, and local business owners and residents – who keep Great Camp Sagamore the treasured place it has been for 125 years.

Stay the Weekend:

Enjoy more time at camp! Join in from August 5-7, 2022 for Gala weekend programming. Weekend packages will include lodging and meals for Friday & Saturday. Gather with friends and enjoy special activities on Friday night, including music and gourmet s’mores around the campfire, a picnic lunch on Saturday, and many other activities before the Gala & Benefit.

Weekend packages do not include Gala & Benefit Dinner tickets for Saturday night. Lodging availability is limited and reserved on a first-come-basis. Booking information will be available on the Great Camp Sagamore webpage soon.
Consider Becoming an Event Sponsor:
Sponsorships allow  Great Camp Sagamore staff to continue providing quality, diverse programming that serves and uplifts a wide range of people, while maintaining reasonable prices and increasing scholarships amid rising costs. Deciding to sponsor this annual celebration also provides you with tangible benefits, which can be found through this link.
Great Camp Sagamore opens to the public on Memorial Day Weekend, May 27.
Find more information about Great Camp Sagamore here: https://www.sagamore.org/
Photo at top: A previous Great Camp Sagamore Annual Gala & Benefit for Historic Preservation. Photo courtesy of Great Camp Sagamore.

Sunday, May 22, 2022

Weekly news round up

A collection of interesting reads:

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Saturday, May 21, 2022

Crown Point Banding Station record: Banding a Yellow-Breasted Chat and Hairy Woodpecker for the first time

Another week gone by at the Crown Point Banding Station, and we survived the big storms that rolled through yesterday afternoon (May 16.) We pulled the nets, and took the canopies off their structures (as possible 60 MPH winds were predicted, and these sun shelters are only rated for no more than 15 MPH.) We sat in our vehicles as the storms passed mostly to the north and south, but there were a couple that went right overhead and dumped rain on us. To the north we heard that quarter-inch hail had accumulated to an inch on the ground.
We had several exciting events during the week up in the sky, including the blood moon on Sunday night (May 15)… that was neat. I had photographed this a couple times before over Limekiln Lake. We had rain showers during the afternoon that day, but I got to see the full moon rise only to have it go under a big black cloud for about an hour during which I napped in a chair outside. When I woke up, the moon was just popping out again about one third covered already. I took photos as it gradually covered turning a bright orange and completely covered about 11:30. I went to bed then as more clouds were moving in and covered it again. After the storms yesterday it was cloudy most of the night. This morning, May 17, just before we put the nets up I photographed the nearly full moon in some neat clouds.

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Saturday, May 21, 2022

Discussion time: How many roads?

roads in wild forestDiscussions in the Adirondacks can get pretty meta from time to time. Take for instance, the ongoing debate about “when is a tree considered a tree?” Add to that a recent presentation at Adirondack Park Agency’s May meeting about what constitutes a road.

Gwen Craig reports on the agency having to make decisions on how many road miles should be permissible in wild forest-designated lands.

The APA is tasked with determining the following:

  1. What was the existing mileage of roads in wild forest in 1972 and what is the existing mileage today?
  2. What constitutes a material increase in road mileage?
  3. Do paths that are open only to people with disabilities meet the definition of a road in the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan and therefore require inclusion in the total wild forest road mileage?

While the discussion might seem to be “in the weeds,” it can have impacts on communities now and going forward, as new lands are added to the park. The APA wants to hear your thoughts on it and so do we! Are there existing wild forest roads that you use? Or do you think they should all be closed off? Are you a person with disabilities that could benefit from easier access to the backcountry? Please leave a comment below.

Above: A map from the Adirondack Park Agency shows public motor vehicle roads in the Moose River Plains Wild Forest. 


Saturday, May 21, 2022

Lake George groups at odds over milfoil plan

lake george

The Lake George Association last week made good on its promise to explore all options for blocking the planned use of an aquatic herbicide on Lake George.

The nation’s oldest lake association – along with Lake George Waterkeeper Chris Navitsky, the Town of Hague and a shoreline resident – sued Thursday to stop the herbicide plan. In its petition, the association took aim at the process that led to permit approvals by the Department of Environmental Conservation and Adirondack Park Agency, arguing the agencies failed to consider important concerns raised by the public. The suit accuses the state agencies of “behind the scenes decision-making” to rush the plan to approval.

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Friday, May 20, 2022

Creative Adirondacks: Photographer Skip Murray

skip murraySkip Murray is a fine arts photographer who values the art of taking a good photograph more than the type of camera equipment he is using. Whether it’s the delight in a child’s face, the dynamic energy of brilliant holiday fireworks, or the collective joy of a summer Saturday market, Skip’s focus is capturing the emotional essence of what he is photographing. His camera, currently a Nikon SLR,  almost seems like an afterthought, although he is sure to have it with him. Whether he’s planning on photographing an event, or not, you’ll see Skip with his camera around his neck on the off chance that  he sees  a shot he would not want to miss.  He’s also not adverse to taking a photo with an iPhone.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, May 20, 2022

Outdoor conditions (5/20): Muddy trails, warmer weather, cold water temps

outdoor conditions logoThe following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

NEW THIS WEEK:

High Peaks Wilderness: Conditions, 05/19: Conditions are a mix of rotten snow and lots of mud. Dress in layers and bring extra so you can keep yourself dry. Ice may persist in places above 4,000 feet, so microspikes are still recommended. Recent rains may have swollen waterways making bridgeless water crossing difficult or even dangerous. Please avoid all trails above 2,500 feet while DEC’s muddy trails advisory is in effect.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, May 20, 2022

DEC Urges New Yorkers to Leave Fawns and Other Young Wildlife in the Wild

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos is reminding New Yorkers to appreciate wildlife from a distance and resist the urge to pick up newborn fawns and other young wildlife.

“When young wildlife venture into the world, they may have a brief inability to walk or fly on their own, making some people believe they might need help,” Commissioner Seggos said. “However, young wildlife belongs in the wild and in nearly all cases, interaction with people does more harm than good to the animals.”

If You Care, Leave it There

When people encounter young wildlife, they are likely not lost or abandoned, but purposely left there by their parents to keep them hidden from predators while the adult animal is nearby collecting food for the newborn.

White-tailed deer fawns are a good example of how human interaction with young wildlife can be problematic. Fawns are born during late May and early June, and although they can walk shortly after birth, they spend most of their first several days lying still in tall grass, leaf litter, or sometimes relatively unconcealed. During this period, a fawn is usually left alone by the adult female (doe), except when nursing.

Human Interactions Do More Harm than Good to Wild Animals

People occasionally find a lone fawn and mistakenly assume it has been abandoned, which is rare. A fawn’s best chance to survive is to be raised by the adult doe. If human presence is detected by the doe, the doe may delay its next visit to nurse.

Fawns should never be picked up. A fawn’s protective coloration and ability to remain motionless help it to avoid detection by predators and people. By the end of a fawn’s second week of life, it begins to move about, spend more time with the doe, and eat on its own. At about 10 weeks of age, fawns are no longer dependent on milk, although they continue to nurse occasionally into the fall.

The more serious cases of animals being abandoned are due to injury. Anyone that encounters a young wild animal that is obviously injured or orphaned may wish to call a wildlife rehabilitator. Wildlife rehabilitators are trained volunteers licensed by DEC. They are the only people legally allowed to receive and treat distressed wildlife because they have the experience, expertise, and facilities to successfully treat and release wild animals once rehabilitated.

Additionally, DEC reminds the public that young wildlife are not pets. Keeping wildlife in captivity is illegal and harmful to the animal. Wild animals are not well-suited to life in captivity and may carry diseases that can be harmful to humans. DEC also advises New Yorkers to keep pets indoors when young wild animals are present. Many fledgling birds cannot fly when they first leave the nest and are easy prey for a domestic cat.

Anyone who observes wildlife that appears to be sick or behaving abnormally should contact their DEC regional wildlife office.

For more information and answers to frequently asked questions about young wildlife, visit DEC’s website.

Photo at top: A resting fawn. DEC photo. 



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