Sunday, April 14, 2019

2018 Mirror Lake Monitoring Report Released

Mirror Lake Report The Ausable River Association (AsRA) and Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute (AWI) have released the 2018 Water Quality Report for Mirror Lake. The report shows that Mirror Lake continues to be negatively affected by road salt and that lack of mixing in the spring, first documented in 2017, remains a problem. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, April 14, 2019

New This Season at Adirondack Experience (ADKX)

Adirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake (ADKX), is set to open for its 62nd season on Friday, May 24, 2019. This year ADKX opens two new temporary exhibits, a new permanent installation out on Minnow Pond and a new family event. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 13, 2019

A Tale of Two Sugar Making Seasons

sugaring The 2019 maple sugaring season has, for most, just ended in the Northeast. And so sugarmakers are tallying up their sap and syrup volumes to see how they made out. My sense, as a sugarmaker myself, is that most did well.

In tallying our own numbers, it was interesting to look at this year compared to last, as things unfolded in very different ways. In 2018 we collected our first sap on February 19, and our last on April 4. Within that 45-day window, we collected sap on 25 days. This year we collected our first sap on March 12 and our last on April 7. In that 28-day window, we collected on 26 days. In other words, we collected roughly the same number of days, it’s just that last season was drawn out, and this one was compressed. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 13, 2019

Spencer Phillips: The Humbling Power of Wilderness

protecting the wildLet’s stipulate that religious epiphany requires an understanding of one’s relationship to the divine … to the creator … to God. I would further submit that this understanding is fundamentally a matter of humility. Humility is the recognition that we are not masters of the universe — not even of our own little corners of it — and that we need something more than ourselves if we are to make sense of our lives. What Kennedy’s observation suggests is that this understanding — this humility — is best attained in wilderness.

I am not going to argue that other human experiences cannot have this effect. Try giving birth, for example. Or, if you are not properly equipped, watch your wife do it. Listen to a symphony. Or head to a museum or gallery and see what Georgia O’Keeffe or Ansel Adams saw when they looked at the wild. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, April 13, 2019

Poetry: Storm Coming

Bluest blue,
Belies the timpani of thunder that warns,
Storm coming.
Trilling crescendo of avian flautists sounds,
As feathered soloists shelter in trees.
Couplet notes of dragonflies,
Scurrying, scrabbling snare drums of gray squirrels warn,
Storm coming.
Rat-a-tat percussion of cascading droplets
Bless my skin, kiss my hair, soften my dress.
Wet blades of grass waltz and conduct in elemental time,
Primal heartbeat metronomes,
Washing my bare toes with their grace.
Every windgust turns a new page in it’s airborne aria and
Warns,
Storm coming,
Storm cleansing,
Storm inspiring,
Storm renewing.
As it always will.

Read More Poems From The Adirondack Almanack HERE.


Friday, April 12, 2019

Featured Hike: The Open Ridge of Jay Mountain

jay mountain trailAt 3,600 ft of elevation, Jay mountain, part of the Jay Mountain Wilderness, provides stunning views from an open ridge of the surrounding Adirondack Mountains. » Continue Reading.


Friday, April 12, 2019

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, April 12, 2019

Registration Open For Malone YMCA’s Camp Akalaka

Camp Akalaka classesRegistration is now open for the Camp Akalaka in Malone, Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4 pm, from July 1st to August 30th.

Cornell Cooperative Extension has been partnering with the Malone YMCA to provide the day camp in Malone, which is open to ages 5-12.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, April 12, 2019

This Week’s Big Adirondack News Stories


Thursday, April 11, 2019

John Sheehan: Adirondacks and the NYS Budget

NYS CapitolConservationists had much to applaud after Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the Legislature passed a State Budget that will protect clean water, buy new park land, resist invasive species, build more resilient trails and make the park more welcoming place for all state residents.

Conservationist also had a right to wonder why the budget included no additional staff at key agencies, and why the state didn’t pass comprehensive legislation requiring the state to meet new carbon emissions goals. The budget did include funding for some climate initiatives. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 11, 2019

Current Adirondack Outdoor Conditions (Apr 11)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon and fully updated by Friday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

Learn and practice the seven Leave No Trace principles. Carry out what you have carried in. Do not leave gear, food, or other items at lean-tos and campsites. Do not litter. Take the free online Leave No Trace course here.

BE PREPARED! Start slow, gain experience. Carry proper safety equipment and weather protection and bring plenty of water, lights and a map. When on the trail: keep the group together, watch the time, and be prepared to turn back. Accidents happen to the most experienced people. Be prepared to spend an unplanned night in the woods in freezing temperatures. Always carry food, a space blanket, emergency whistle, first aid kit, fire making tools, extra clothing layers and socks, and a map and compass. Inform someone of your itinerary and just before entering the backcountry or launching a boat check the National Weather Service watches, warnings, and advisories here. Follow Adirondack weather forecasts at Burlington and Albany and consult the High Elevation, Recreation, or Lake Champlain forecasts.

April 11th, 2019 – SPECIAL NOTICES » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 11, 2019

Rangers Rescue Injured Hiker On Baker Mtn

forest ranger logoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of recent missions carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 11, 2019

Paint and Sip at Lake George Land Conservancy

To celebrate spring, Lake George Land Conservancy is offering the chance to make your artist dreams come true with a one-day beginner painting class and wine tasting with Patrice Jarvis-Weber.  Jarvis-Weber is conducting a one-day workshop where adults and children 10 and up can learn to paint a trillium, a beautiful native Adirondack wildflower. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, April 10, 2019

High Peaks Need Bold, Comprehensive Management

As winter shows sure signs of releasing its grip on the Adirondacks, a new hiking season in the High Peaks Wilderness is coming into view. The allure of the High Peaks is immense for hikers, which is understandable.

There is simply no other place anywhere east of the Mississippi River that provides the experience like that found on the summit of an interior High Peak surrounded by dozens of others. The views from Gothics or Colvin or Colden or Haystack mountains, or any number of other High Peaks, are simply stunning.

It’s no wonder the High Peaks Wilderness is in the midst of a major boom in the number of hikers, which has stressed the region’s management. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Gouverneur’s Rhoda Fox Graves, NYS Political Trailblazer (Conclusion)

The Ogdensburg Journal-Republican, forced to eat crow after rejecting Rhoda Graves’ claims of Warren Thayer’s corruption, applied twisted logic to justify their stance and the senator’s behavior. They opened with: “Senator Thayer has retired…. It was found that he was on the payroll of a utility corporation and, we feel, working against the interests of the average resident of this district who has been forced to pay unjust rates.” The words “we feel” simply did not apply. There was no question he had been putting the financial screws to his voters while protecting a power company and lining his own pockets.

And then came the kicker, a painful contortion of words—possibly the weakest excuse they could have drummed up—to justify years of unethical, anti-constituent acts by the man they supported. “Senator Thayer was at least consistent. During his entire political life, he has been a close ally of the power groups, a fact that he has never denied. Head of a power company, he was elected to the Assembly and then the Senate, and could not have been expected to change his views.” In any day and age, no matter what your politics are, that’s a sign of having drunk the Kool-Aid. » Continue Reading.