Thursday, March 31, 2022

Adirondack Experience announces new virtual ‘Dacks Drinks series

The Adirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake, (ADKX) announces their new virtual program series – ‘DACKS DRINKS. This series, co-sponsored by the Albany Public Library, will highlight local flavor – from the adventurous rum-runners of the early 20th century to today’s craft brewers infusing their brews with tastes from Adirondack forests. The series will feature two free online sessions, A Taste of Tupper with Garret Kopp from Birch Boys and Josh Weise and Tanner Hockey, Brewers at Raquette River Brewery on Wednesday, April 13 at 7 p.m. and History with a Twist – Adirondack Bootlegging with Niki Kourofsky, editor at Adirondack Life, and Stacia Takach from Lake Placid Stagecoach Inn on Wednesday, April 20 at 7 p.m.

‘Dacks Drinks

Wednesday, April 13, 7 pm: A Taste of Tupper with Garret Kopp from Birch Boys and Josh Weise and Tanner Hockey, Brewers at Raquette River Brewery

Meet two of Tupper Lake’s taste-making companies as Raquette River Brewing and the Birch Boys share their stories and offerings. Discover their unique collaboration to create Chugga Chugga Chaga Honey Brown Ale, an English-style brown ale made with sustainably harvested Chaga mushrooms. Josh Weise and Tanner Hockey from Raquette River Brewery will wrap up the evening with a few tips on how to infuse local flavor for home brewers.

About the speaker: Garret Kopp grew up in Tupper Lake and began harvesting Chaga mushrooms and selling them at local pop-up markets with his grandmother when he was 15. He created the Birch Boys while in college and today, the company leases 220,000 acres of private land in the Adirondacks for sustainable Chaga harvesting, making products like teas, tinctures, and skin care products. Kopp is also a certified mushroom identification expert & licensed NYS guide.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 30, 2022

What will we eat when the bugs are gone?

black fly insects

Part 1: Insects and People

Are insects in decline? I am 74 years old and have lived up here in the High Peaks for the last 20 years, after spending a good chunk of every Summer up here as a kid. Starting in the fifties, when our dad drove us up to the Adirondacks, one of the rituals while stopping for gas, was cleaning the smashed bugs off the windshield. Today… not so much. If you are less than 40 or 50 years old, you may find this confusing, as you tend to compare the present to a much shorter past.

Speaking of subjective observations, I believe there are far fewer skeeters and black flies today than when I was a kid. Granted, the BTI program to go after black fly larva dates back only about 35 years, but still, it seems to me that when you are out there fishing, hunting, or hiking, there are fewer bugs in the Adirondacks than there used to be. 

There are also personal factors at play, starting with the fact that skeeters and no-see-ums are initially attracted to the carbon dioxide exhalation of mammals, the relative strength of the odor of lactic acid emitted by your skin pores, your blood type (mosquitoes are more likely to target the odor of type O blood than type A), what colors you wear (avoid darker colors) and how you personally smell to these critters.  I’ve been hiking with my late wife Wendy and observed that she was much more heavily targeted by skeeters and black fly than I was, a frustrating situation for which she would provide less scientific explanations, often related to speculation as to how long ago my ancestors came down from the trees.

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Kid next to water
Wednesday, March 30, 2022

Rangers take part in avalanche training at Whiteface Mountain

forest ranger report

Recent NYS DEC Forest Ranger actions:

Town of Mayfield, Fulton County, River Search:

On March 21 at 3:40 p.m., Ray Brook Dispatch requested Forest Ranger assistance with a potential search after a kayak was seen floating down the Kennyetto River. Forest Rangers Kerr, Morehouse, Nally, Scott, and Thompson were joined by New York State Police, the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Department, and Mayfield Fire. At approximately 5:30 p.m., the kayak was retrieved.

The search concluded after Rangers determined the kayak had been tied to a tree and likely broke free after the ice melted.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, March 30, 2022

Paul Smith’s College winter sports season roundup

It was a winter to remember for the athletic department at Paul Smith’s College, and thankfully not for reasons pertaining to COVID-19.

When the pandemic erupted two years ago, the initial moves across the country were to cancel sports events and keep athletes safe. This carried over, to a lesser degree, to the winter of 2021-2022.

In reviewing the past six months, PSC Bobcat teams got back to the basics of trying to win games and competitions with the specter of COVID still present.

PSC was led in this endeavor by the Nordic ski team which won four national team titles and two individual crowns in the United States Collegiate Ski Association’s recent championships in Lake Placid. Prior to this, it had been nearly 60 years since a PSC team won a national championship.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 29, 2022

Time To Pass A Constitutional Amendment For Van Hoevenberg

Protect the Adirondacks supports a proposed Article 14 Constitutional Amendment for the Mount Van Hoevenberg Olympic Sports Complex outside Lake Placid. At the Mt. Van Hoevenberg complex, the Olympic Regional Development Authority (ORDA) currently manages around 1,220 acres of Forest Preserve classified as Intensive Use by the Adirondack Park Agency (APA). Abutting these lands is 319 acres of land owned by the Town of North Elba. Together this complex houses the Olympic bobsled and luge track, cross-country skiing and biathlon trails, and associated facilities, with most of the intensive buildings and facilities located on the town lands.

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Tuesday, March 29, 2022

Celebrating fresh water

water in the southern ADKs

Happy World Water Day (on March 22). This United Nations observance day was established in 1993 to celebrate water and raise awareness of the 2 billion people across the world living without access to safe drinking water. This year’s theme is a focus on groundwater: “Making the invisible visible.”

The world relies almost entirely on groundwater for drinking water supplies, sanitation systems, farming and other uses, according to the UN. The recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report emphasized concerns about the future of drinking water as warming trends and human development accelerate threats to water supplies.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 29, 2022

Old Forge Library to offer free Zoom lecture featuring master flutist Galen Abdur-Razzaq on March 31

The Old Forge Library will host a free, live, online performance with an evening learning about female jazz musicians. On Thursday, March 31 at 7 p.m., lecturer and master flutist Galen Abdur-Razzaq will highlight the influence women have had on the evolution of jazz and their significant contributions to the art form.

Women have been involved in jazz since the early 1920s, not just as vocalists, but as instrumentalists, composers and arrangers. An understanding of jazz would not be complete without highlighting the influence and contributions of women such as Bessie Smith, Valaida Snow, Mildred Bailey, Mary Lou Williams, Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, and Sarah Vaughn. The goal is to provide an understanding particularly of their personal lives, their ability to read music, perform and survive in a time when jazz was considered “a man’s world.”

Abdur-Razzaq is a riveting speaker with an encyclopedic knowledge of the history of jazz. He will help attendees gain a deeper appreciation for women’s contributions to this music genre through a combination of lecture and musical pieces performed by him as he displays his talents on the flute.

Abdur-Razzaq studied at the Berklee College of Music. He holds a master’s degree in education and performing arts from Rutgers University and has collaborated with some of the greatest jazz musicians.

Those who wish to obtain the free Zoom link can call (315) 369-6008 or e-mail [email protected]

For more information on upcoming library events and programs please visit https://www.oldforgelibrary.org/.

Photo at top: Lecturer and master flutist Galen Abdur-Razzaq. Photo provided by the Old Forge Library. 

 

 


Monday, March 28, 2022

Telling Our Stories: The Adirondack Story Project

We are blessed to have quality news outlets in the Adirondacks – local newspapers and magazines, social media, and including, of course, the Adirondack Almanack and Explorer. These resources are place-based and provide us with the current news and events. They also serve as archival records for future generations.

Since 2014, I’ve shared a number of my stories on the Adirondack Almanack. There are more avenues for telling one’s stories now, eight years later, primarily through the perfection of online resources because of the Covid-19 pandemic and our resultant isolation.

I want to introduce readers of the Almanack to a project for recording audio stories which began a few years ago through the Keene Valley Library. To date, this Adirondack Community Story Project has collected over 250 three-to-five-minute audio stories on the historical and social cultural history of the Town of Keene.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, March 28, 2022

Pendragon hosts benefit for Ukraine

ukraine benefit

Join local artists and organizations at Pendragon Theatre in Saranac Lake in an event to benefit the artists of Ukraine. Taking place on Wednesday, March 30 @ 7pm, the evening of music, stories, theatre and poetry is presented by: Adirondack Center for Writing, Adirondack Stage Rats, Chris Kowanko, Drew Sprague, Esther Baker, John Brown Lives!, Joseph Szwed, Historic Saranac Lake, Pendragon Theatre, Roger Mitchell, Upper Jay Arts, Center & Recovery Lounge and further support by Depot Theatre

All proceeds raised that evening will go directly towards the non-profit, Artists at Risk (AR): a non-profit organization at the intersection of human rights and the arts working to provide artists from Ukraine with emergency resources, travel aid, and residencies at host institutions across Europe.

The evening will last approximately 80 minutes and be both a celebration of artists but also a call to action and sign of solidarity for displaced artists in the Ukraine. $15 suggested donation per person. Ticket donations and seats can be purchased at www.PendragonTheatre.org or by calling the box office at 518-891-1854.

Monday, March 28, 2022

Keeping track of birds

bird band station

 

Some people open Christmas gifts with relish. But it is with an equal amount of anticipation that we bird nerds open the annual PDF emailed by Gordon Howard highlighting the previous year’s count at the Crown Point Banding Station — a document that arrived in the mailbox this week. Volunteers at the station, located at the Crown Point Historic Site, net, count and band dozens of species each spring at one of the nation’s more significant avian highways. Prior to Covid, it had become a popular attraction for tourists, birders and school classes, but it’s been closed to the public for the past two years due to the pandemic. This year it will be open again, from May 6 to May 21 for the station’s 47th consecutive year of banding birds.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 27, 2022

The Forest for the Trees: Remembrance of Frank Dorchak by his son

frank dorchak

By F. P. (Frank) Dorchak

It was 2:20 p.m. February 20, 2022.

I stood in the middle of my dad’s workshop, listening to the drone of the space heater switching on and off against the howling winter swirling and eddying outside the building. I imagined my dad, here, by himself…working on all his woodwork under the bright LED lighting lining the ceiling and beams…calming, classical music playing in the background…puffing on a pipe when he was smoking, otherwise not…his presence—honed from a lifetime of being underwater, in the woods, and helping and leading others—permeating everything. Hands confidently and skillfully manipulating wood to conform to his will, his specifications…smoothing it over…verifying its obedience…

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 27, 2022

Old Forge grandmother, Beth Pashley, chronicles her picturesque Adirondack hiking adventures

Spring has sprung in the Adirondacks, and although the coming of springtime signals a time of renewal and helps many to come out of the “winter blues,” early Spring also means gray skies, soggy yards, and mud, lots of it.

What better time to showcase the serene beauty of the Adirondack region, while highlighting the artistic talents of one Adirondack grandmother who found rejuvenation, peace and serenity in the mountains, igniting a newfound adoration for hiking that she hopes will span across many generations in her family.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 27, 2022

Weekly news round up

A collection of interesting reads:

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 26, 2022

Youth hockey team, the Inlet Mighty Loons, capped memorable first season

Spring has sprung on this first day of spring (Sunday, March 20) and my daffodils would have bloomed yesterday if the sun stayed out, however it started snowing which shut them down. The crocus usually come out first, but they have only popped out of the ground and the daffodils have flower buds ready to pop. Coming home from Utica on Friday (March 18) with temperatures in the fifties (and even sixty) I kept mentioning there are more Robins along the shoulder of the road. My wife, Karen, said, “I hear you, yes, there are lots of Robins.”

My neighbor Eric Sutherland’s sugarhouse [Maple Moss Sugarworks] has been cooking 24/7 this last week with lots of guests visiting his operation. He is into it big time and I’m learning more every day about his operation. With each day freezing at night and thawing during the day this next week he should be making maple syrup every day. He loves to show people his operation and he will be glad to sell you some of his products.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 26, 2022

MAKE IT: Fish Chowder

Fish chowder is a wonderful way to use up the panfish in your freezer. This simple recipe is easy to make and cooks up quickly. Pair with some crusty bread and a salad for a full meal. Enjoy!
(Serves 4)

Ingredients:
 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
 1 small onion, chopped
 1 stalk celery, chopped
 3 medium potatoes, scrubbed and cubed
 3 cups low-sodium stock (fish, chicken stock, or vegetable)
 1/2 cup chopped carrots or sweet corn kernels
 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, minced
 1 tablespoon lemon juice
 1 tsp. Old Bay-type seasoning
 Salt and pepper to taste
 1-pound boneless, skinless panfish fillets, cut into 1-inch chunks
 1 cup milk (I used 2%)

Directions:
1. Sauté onion and celery in oil until tender. Add potatoes, fish stock, carrots or corn,
parsley, lemon juice, and seasonings. Simmer until vegetables are tender, about 30
minutes.
2. Add fish and simmer for around 5 minutes, or until fish flakes with a fork.  Add milk, and
heat gently (do not bring to boil).
3. Enjoy!

Nutrition Information: (calculated with vegetable stock and carrots): Serving size: 1/4th recipe |
Servings per recipe: 4 | Calories: 324, total fat: 22.5 g, saturated fat: 9 g, cholesterol: 0 mg,
sodium: 44 mg, carbohydrates: 53 g, fiber: 4.7 g, sugar: 6.5 g, protein: 20.2 g

*Recipe adapted from The Wild Harvest Table



Kid next to water

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