Friday, July 5, 2019

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, July 5, 2019

Specialty Fruit Trials On Research Farm Tour

Juneberrry trial at the research farm in WillsboroThe Cornell University Willsboro Research Farm Open House has been set for Wednesday, July 10 from 1:30 to 4 pm.

Young specialty fruit trials funded by the farmer-driven Northern New York Agricultural Development Program (NNYADP) will be among the many crop plots available for touring during the open house. The tour of the farm facilities and research fields is free and open to the public. It will leave the main office at 48 Sayward Lane, Willsboro, at 2 pm. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 5, 2019

This Week’s Big Adirondack News Stories


Thursday, July 4, 2019

State Tree Cutting on Forest Preserve Ruled Unconstitutional

A typical view on a class II community connector trail where 1000 trees a mile are destroyed by state agencies provided by ProtectThe Appellate Division, Third Department, ruled Wednesday that state tree cutting to build a network of wide class II community connector snowmobile trails in the Adirondack Forest Preserve violated Article XIV, Section 1 of the State Constitution. The Appellate Division, Third Department, reversed a lower court ruling issued in 2017.

Protect the Adirondacks had challenged the constitutionality of cutting more than 25,000 trees to build over 27 miles of new snowmobile trails in the Forest Preserve. The lawsuit was started in 2013, injunctions against further tree cutting were ordered in 2016, and a bench trial was held at State Supreme Court in 2017. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 4, 2019

Current Adirondack Outdoor Conditions (July 4)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon and fully updated by Friday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adklmanack@gmail.com.

Learn and practice the seven Leave No Trace principles. Carry out what you have carried in. Do not leave gear, food, or other items at lean-tos and campsites. Do not litter. Take the free online Leave No Trace course here.

BE PREPARED! Start slow, gain experience. Carry proper safety equipment and weather protection and bring plenty of water and lights, and a map. When on the trail, stay together, monitor the time, and be prepared to turn back. Accidents happen to the most experienced people. Be prepared to spend an unplanned night in the woods in cold temperatures. Always carry food, a space blanket, emergency whistle, first aid kit, fire making tools, extra clothing layers and socks, a map and compass, and the knowledge to use them. Inform someone of your itinerary and before entering the backcountry or launching a boat check the National Weather Service watches, warnings, and advisories here. Follow Adirondack weather forecasts at Burlington and Albany and consult the High Elevation, Recreation, or Lake Champlain forecasts.

July 4th, 2019 – SPECIAL NOTICES » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 4, 2019

High Peaks Frontcountry Stewards in Keene

Marcy FieldThe Town of Keene, the Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute (AWI), and the Paul Smith’s College adventure guides are providing information and education to hikers in the High Peaks through a new frontcountry steward program. Stewards will be positioned in the Town of Keene along Route 73. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 4, 2019

Keeseville Kicking-Off Adirondack Plein Air Festival Season

I always say I’m not in the market to buy art, but then I find myself in awe of all the talented artists and know that window shopping may not be enough. Even if I don’t buy art, I am always in the market to experience it. I love the possibility of seeing an artist in various Adirondack locations, putting creativity onto canvas. The benefit of a Plein Air Festival is in seeing those artists create in nature and then attend the art show to meet and discuss their process. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 3, 2019

Major Adirondack Conservation Reform Bill Falls Short

NYS capital buildingLegislation advanced in each house of the New York State Legislature this year that, if approved, would have amended the Adirondack Park Agency (APA) Act to require conservation development standards, clustering, and open space protections for the largest proposed subdivisions in the Adirondack Park.

The proposed bill would be the most significant amendment to the Land Use and Development Plan since enactment in 1973. The legislation gained some bi-partisan support but failed to advance in final days of the session when North Country representatives Senator Betty Little and Assemblymember Dan Stec lobbied to keep the bill from coming up for a vote. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 3, 2019

Sembrich Hosts Seagle Music Colony’s Children’s Opera

monkey and francineYoung artists at the Seagle Music Colony will present the children’s opera Monkey and Francine in the City of Tigers on Wednesday, July 17 at 10 am, at The Sembrich, in Bolton, on Lake George.

A 45-minute one-act opera for the whole family, Monkey and Francine in the City of Tigers is described as a new, action-packed tale of bravery, smarts, and family ties. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 3, 2019

Clifton-Fine Summer Music Series

clifton fine summer music seriesThe Cultural Arts Committee of the Clifton-Fine Economic Development Corp has announced the 19th Annual Clifton-Fine Summer Music Series.

All shows are funded through grant awards and individual donors, to bring free, live music to the Clifton-Fine region of the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Searches, Rescues, Hiker Dies At Shelving Rock Mountain

forest ranger logoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of recent missions carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Be Informed About Harmful Algal Blooms

keeping dogs safe from harmful algal bloomsNew York Sea Grant is reminding the public to be informed about harmful algal blooms (HABs), how to avoid exposure of oneself and pets, and where to report potential HABs.

In a statement to the press, Jesse Lepak, Ph.D., Great Lakes Fisheries and Ecosystem Health Specialist with New York Sea Grant said: “Not all algal blooms are harmful, but some dense populations of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, can produce toxins that can have serious effects on liver, nervous system, and skin of humans and their pets.” » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Tupper Lake Woodsmen’s Days Event Grows

chainsaw sculpture demonstration provided by ROOSTTupper Lake Woodsmen’s Days is set to return to the village’s Municipal Park July 12-14 for a celebration of the region’s heritage of logging and lumberjacking.

This year the New York State Lumberjack Association (NYSLA) will be on hand for the first time. Members of the organization pay dues to compete in similar events around the state.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Big Band Sound: ‘Easy Money’ In Old Forge

easy money bandThe Summer Concert Series held on the Old Forge Lakefront has been set for Sunday evenings at 7 pm. The first concert will feature Easy Money on July 7th. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Hummingbird Moths, A Primer

Hummingbird Moth One afternoon last summer, my partner Rick called me out onto our deck to see a tiny hummingbird. Not just tiny, but the tiniest hummingbird he had ever seen. My curiosity piqued, I walked out and there it was – hovering in front of the bee balm, sipping nectar and beating its wings at an impossible rate. It was a rich rust color and about an inch and a half long. By comparison, the smallest ruby-throated hummingbirds are twice that length. This was truly the most diminutive hummingbird imaginable.

Or was it? » Continue Reading.