Sunday, November 8, 2020

SUNY Canton SBDC launches shop local campaign

Downtown Saranac Lake for shop local program.

A new campaign called Buy Local or Bye-Bye Local seeks to help North Country  businesses.

The SUNY Canton Small Business Development Center (SBDC) and regional partners are reminding community members to shop at local, independent businesses this holiday season to
help them survive as they operate under continuing COVID restrictions.

The SBDC is partnering with business organizations across seven Counties – including Ticonderoga Area Chamber of Commerce, Franklin County IDA/LDC, Saranac Lake Area Chamber of Commerce, The Saint Lawrence County Chamber, and the Essex County IDA in a united effort to keep small businesses afloat.

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Sunday, November 8, 2020

Adirondack weekly roundup

Here’s a roundup of interesting features and other Adirondack news from around the Web:
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Saturday, November 7, 2020

Adirondack Report: Good news for Lake George; historic mansion for sale in Newcomb

milfoil matsLast week we had a couple of Lake George-area stories, in case you missed them.

One was about Dog Beach, a public area next to the state’s Million Dollar Beach at the southern end of the lake. If you’ve walked by there lately, you may have noticed the construction equipment. Dog Beach is getting turned into a stormwater filtration project. Some of it will go back to open, public space, but it will be smaller than before. The goal is to filter out nutrients, bacteria and sediment.

We also saw some benthic mats, once used to control Eurasian watermilfoil, removed from the lake. David Wick, director of the Lake George Park Commission, said this was the way the commission used to treat dense beds of milfoil, but these mats are now just trash sitting on the lake bottom. Divers helped remove them last month.

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Saturday, November 7, 2020

When Lightning Strikes: Evening of performances by world-renowned poets

Rural meets urban, when the Adirondack Center for Writing and Bowery Poetry Club collaborate for a brand new event. When Lightning Strikes has been designed to introduce new poets to Adirondack audiences, and new audiences to Bowery Poetry Club poets.

When Lightning Strikes is taking place at 7 p.m. November 9, and hosted by Jive Poetic, featuring Mahogany L. Browne, Adam Falkner, Carlos Andrés Gómez, Omar Holmon, Cynthia Dewi Oka, and Ramya Ramana. The event is live online at the Bowery Poetry Club’s website and live on Facebook. All are invited to tune in for a sliding scale donation of $5-15 payable at paypal.me/adkctr4writing to be split between the two organizations.

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Saturday, November 7, 2020

Hunting camp tales

fall hunting campWe’re well into hunting season, so here are a few related tales from the Almanack archive:

From 2018: Debunking the myths around the phases of the month’s effects on deer behavior

From 2010: Dave Gibson writes about being a “greenhorn” at hunting camp

From 2013: Iced in at hunting camp

And for a recent collection of current stories, check out my rundown of the week’s top stories on the Adirondack Explorer and Adirondack Almanack here and/or sign up for my weekly “Adk News Briefing” email newsletter.

Fall hunting camp photo from the Almanack archive


Friday, November 6, 2020

The Woolly Bear’s Winter Weather Prediction 

woolly bearMany of us have heard of the story that a small, fuzzy caterpillar Called the Woolly Bear (aka woolly worm or hedgehog caterpillar) carried the prediction of the coming winter on its back.  Whatever name you choose to call them, these cuddly looking caterpillars are often found in the autumn after they have left their food plants, a variety of grasses and weeds, in search of a sheltered spot where they can hibernate as larvae for the winter.

According to folklore, the amount of black on the woolly bear in autumn varies proportionately with the severity of the coming winter in the geographical area where the caterpillar is found.  The longer the woolly bear’s black bands, the longer, colder, snowier, and more severe the winter will be.  Similarly, the wider the middle brown band is associated with a milder upcoming winter.  The position of the longest dark bands supposedly indicates which part of winter will be coldest or hardest.  If the head end of the caterpillar is dark, the beginning of winter will be severe.  If the tail end is dark, the end of winter will be cold. In addition, the woolly bear caterpillar has 13 segments to its body, which traditional forecasters say correspond to the 13 weeks of winter.

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Friday, November 6, 2020

Search Saratoga PLAN Trails for Painted Rocks

Starting today (November 6), hikers are invited to join the Saratoga PLAN trails scavenger hunt, on select trails. Search for palm-sized rocks painted with inspirational messages that will be hidden along stretches of the Henning Preserve in the Town of Wilton, Orra Phelps Preserve in the Town of Wilton, and Bog Meadow Brook Preserve in Saratoga Springs. Collect meaningful rocks for you or a gift to others.

The project is intended to be more then just a fun way to visit the trails, Alex Fylypovych PLAN’s community engagement manager explains: “People find inspiration in so many ways. Some people find inspiration from walking in the woods or sitting by a stream. Others find it through art. With this project, we’re sort of combining the two… Sharing the message from your rock may reach someone else who could benefit from the uplifting note,” she says. Saratoga PLAN asks that any rocks collected be shared on social media using the hashtag #SaratogaPLANrocks and tagging @SaratogaPLAN. “Spread the inspiration and the joy,” says Fylypovych. “We can all use some more positivity this year.”

The #SaratogaPLANrocks project was made possible through a collaborative effort between Saratoga PLAN (Preserving Land and Nature) and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. Regeneron’s annual Day for Doing Good pairs its employees with various Capital Region nonprofits in order to service their community. Over 50 Regeneron employees painted and hid more than 100 rocks. The project takes inspiration from the nationwide Kindness Rock Project and the Block Island Glass Float Project.

Rocks will not be hidden more then one foot from the trail in order to protect delicate vegetation.


Friday, November 6, 2020

Outdoor Conditions (11/6): Plan ahead

Travel: Check 511NY for road closures and travel conditions, and status of parking lots along the busy Route 73 corridor. Have back-up plans in place and, if the parking lot at your desired destination is full, move on to your back-up plan.

Weather: Check the National Weather Service or NY Mesonow for current conditions and forecasts for the locations where you plan to recreate. Check the National Weather Service Northern Adirondacks and Southern Adirondacks Mountain Point Forecasts for selected summits.

Fire Danger: Low. Check the DEC Fire Danger Map for updated conditions. Never leave campfires unattended. Fully extinguish your campfire before leaving your campsite. Ashes should be cool to the touch. Learn more about campfire safety.

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Friday, November 6, 2020

Latest news headlines

News from around the Adirondacks this week:

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Thursday, November 5, 2020

Dexter Lake and star power in the northern Adirondacks

Last week’s Dexter Lake article covered a decade or two of turmoil near St. Regis Falls around the turn of the century. This week, we return to Dexter Lake eighty years on…

Media coverage of Orrando P. Dexter’s 1903 murder case raged on for quite some time, with national newspapers ‘feasting on the social conflict’ and local editors, worried about the negative impact on Adirondack Tourism, tried to defend the North Country and its people.  As the unsolved murder case slowly faded from the headlines, Dexter Lake once again returned to its quiet former self and all was quiet on the lake for decades. The estate underwent numerous changes in use. It had been a summer camp for boys, sportsman’s hotel, St. Lawrence University research center, and most recently a private residence.

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Thursday, November 5, 2020

NYSAR Annual Recycling Conference

The New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse, and Recycling has announced their 31st Annual Conference, which will take place on a virtual platform over three half days on November 17th through November 19th, 2020.

The NYSAR will be offering their membership and networks the oppertunity to continously expand their knowledge while receiving pertinent information about their industry through this conference. In the spirit of the in-person conference, networking oppertunities will be provided.

To register for the conference, click this link.

NYSAR Conference Schedule:

Tuesday, November 17 –

1:00pm – 5:00pm Conference Programming

5:00pm – 6:00pm Show and Tell Networking Social

Wednesday, November 18 –

10:00am – 3:30pm Conference Programming

Thursday, November 19 –

12:00pm – 1:00pm Virtual Awards Lunch: Recycling Leadership Awards and Poster Contest Winners

1:00pm – 5:00pm Conference Programming

 


Thursday, November 5, 2020

Results are in from Halloween Scarecrow Contest

The winners for Raquette Lake’s Annual Halloween Scarecrow Contest are:

Scariest by Beeba Norris

Halloween Sprit by Autumn Miller

Most Creative by Bayli Bird

Prizes were sponsored by the Long Lake / Raquette Lake Parks and Recreation Department

 

Photos courtesy of Kat Forsell/Town of Long Lake


Thursday, November 5, 2020

Effects of climate change on birds in the Adirondacks

Bird
Boreal forests — and the birds that live in them — are especially sensitive and vulnerable to climate change. Using current research and personal observations, bird expert Joan Collins offers insight into wildlife changes occurring in boreal habitats of the Adirondack forest, primarily as a result of climate change.

An upcoming presentation at 6:30 pm tonight via Zoom will focus on boreal species such as Black-backed Woodpecker, Olive-sided and Yellow-bellied Flycatchers, Canada Jay, Boreal Chickadee, Bicknell’s Thrush, Lincoln’s Sparrow, Rusty Blackbird, and Blackpoll and Palm Warblers, among others, and their high and low elevation habitat. The presentation will utilize photographs, video, and audio of these iconic bird species of the Adirondacks, along with a few mammal species.

The one-time program will be on the Zoom platform and Thursday, November 5th at 6:30 PM EST. Presented by The Wild Center, this live, online program is free for Wild Center members, and is available to others for $15 per household. If not already signed up, click here to register.
After registering for this event, you will receive a confirmation, followed by an email that has the link for joining. The presentation portion will be approximately 45 minutes, followed by Q&A.

Wednesday, November 4, 2020

Chasing waterfalls

How to celebrate a birthday on a chilly, rainy, late autumn day during Covid-19? Visit the waterfalls on the Grass River in the Tooley Pond Tract, of course.

It was not raining when Bruce and I left our house in Keene that mid-October day. A drizzling rain began falling after arriving in Saranac Lake, becoming more intense at Cranberry Lake. The rain had let-up some by the time we reached the trail to the first waterfall, Copper Rock.   

The Tooley Pond Tract includes a Forest Preserve parcel of 6,000 acres, including 20 miles along the South Branch of the Grass River in the northwestern Adirondacks. Our goal was to explore the six waterfalls along the route, an area an Adirondack Explorer article called “A cascade of riches,” noting that most of the falls cannot be viewed from the road. I first visited the falls shortly after reading this 2004 article written by Mark Bowie that welcomed readers on a waterfall hopping venture. Going again after all these years was on my bucket list. 

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Wednesday, November 4, 2020

Rangers return from Colorado firefighting

Fighting Wildfires: On Nov. 3, DEC welcomed back the State’s fourth team of volunteer wildland firefighters from the Divisions of Forest Protection, Lands and Forests, and Fish and Wildlife that were deployed to help battle and contain wildfires raging in western states.

The crew flew to Denver, Colorado, on Oct. 17 for deployment from the Rocky Mountain Coordination Center and were initially assigned to the Cameron Peak fire for nighttime operations, patrol, and structure defense. Their second assignment was at the East Troublesome fire for daytime operations.

The crew was reassigned to Cameron Peak due to sub-freezing temperatures and heavy snow.

The returning crew includes a DEC Forest Ranger crew boss and nine firefighters:

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