Monday, July 19, 2021

Pollution is a rural problem, too

wellWater pollution is a big concern for us here in the Adirondack Park, and we’re not just talking about the kind that wafts in from out-of-state smokestacks and deposits acid in our lakes.

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Monday, July 19, 2021

Report Moose Sightings to DEC

mooseDEC asks the public to report moose sightings online as part of ongoing efforts to monitor moose across New York. While the Adirondacks are home to most New York moose, some live in the eastern part of the state along the Vermont and Massachusetts borders. Moose can also occasionally be found in southeastern New York and the Catskills, but these are usually individuals that have dispersed from other areas. In 2020, the public submitted over 250 moose observations to DEC, and approximately 50 have been reported so far this year.

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Monday, July 19, 2021

Traffic impact information for IRONMAN triathlon on July 25

imlp bike female athlete

Lake Placid, NY – The 21st annual IRONMAN Lake Placid triathlon will take place from 6:25 a.m. to midnight Sunday, July 25. The triathlon route includes a 2.4-mile swim in Mirror Lake, a 112-mile bike ride through Lake Placid, Keene, Upper Jay, Jay, Black Brook, and Wilmington, and a 26.2-mile run in and around the Lake Placid village.

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Sunday, July 18, 2021

It’s Berry Picking Season!

picking berriesSummertime is the perfect time to go berry picking! Plenty of berries are just coming into season, and many more will soon. Here are a couple posts from our archive covering all things berry-related:

From 2012: A delicious blueberry sorbet recipe!

From 2014: An informational article on wild blackberry season in the Adirondacks.

From 2016: On the color of cranberries

From 2016: Juneberries ripening in July

From 2019: Facts about growing berries in the North Country

From 2020: Northern New York runs grower trials for 3 fruits in an effort to establish new commercial fruit crops

Click here to explore all articles tagged under berries in our archive.

Photo: Blueberry harvest at Wild Work Farm in Keene Valley, NY. Netting over berry bushes protects the crop from birds. Most small-scale diversified farms and orchards pick their harvests by hand. Photo provided by Adirondack Harvest

 


Sunday, July 18, 2021

Free “Trees in Trouble” Talk on July 21 via Zoom

trees in trouble graphic

Invasive forest insects and diseases are one of the most severe and urgent threats to the health of Adirondack forests. The first occurrence of emerald ash borer in the Adirondack Park was identified in July 2020. Just a few weeks later the first major infestation of hemlock woolly adelgid in the region was discovered. These two forest pests have the potential to significantly alter the forested landscape of the Adirondacks. In addition, several other damaging pests and diseases are present in other regions of the state and could migrate to the Adirondacks.

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Sunday, July 18, 2021

Keeseville Community Arts Festival: July 23-25

plein air artist

AdkAction is hosting a three-day celebration of arts and artists from July 23-25. The festival will fan out across Keeseville, with several local organizations and businesses holding visual and performing arts events.

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Sunday, July 18, 2021

Weekly news round up

A collection of interesting reads:

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Saturday, July 17, 2021

Celebrating the Spirit of Generosity

giveAcross the Adirondack region, life is returning to something resembling normal. Communities are beginning to host events, businesses are welcoming customers, and neighbors are opening their doors to each other — in short, we’re all coming back together. It’s for this reason that Adirondack Foundation is celebrating the Spirit of Generosity all summer long by sharing stories about the people and places that make our home so special.

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Saturday, July 17, 2021

MAKE IT: Tomato/Tomato Paste Salsa

salsaThis USDA tested and approved recipe is from the University of Georgia Extension. It yields 7-8 pints, and produces a lovely, vinegar-free salsa. This recipe provides a perfect method to use – and preserve – the abundant ripe tomatoes currently (or almost) available at farmers’ markets or even your own gardens! Make sure to use caution when handling chilis and jalapeños, so that you do not inadvertently get the capsaicin oil in your eyes (don’t ask me why I am including that information here!).

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Saturday, July 17, 2021

Plan Next Year’s Perennial Wildflower Garden Now

rudbecka hirta black eyed susan

Look at the wild flowers. See how they grow. – Luke 12:27; International Children’s Bible

You belong among the wildflowers. – Tom Petty

Love is like wildflowers; it’s often found in the most unlikely places. – Ralph Waldo Emerson

As I walk along the fields, meadows, and roads or hike through the forests of northern New York, I often come across wildflowers and think, “those would look great in my yard.” Native wildflowers are hardy, low maintenance, and attractive to pollinators, which makes them very desirable for cultivated landscapes. And, because they’re adapted to the climate and soils of the region, when grown under similar conditions they’re generally well-suited for use in home gardens and landscapes.

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Friday, July 16, 2021

DEC And APA Have A Big Task To Get Back On The Right Side Of Forever Wild

tree cutting lawsuit

The May 4, 2021, decision by the New York Court of Appeals ruled that Class II Community Connector Snowmobile Trails violated Article 14, Section 1, of the New York Constitution. This ruling capped an 8-year legal challenge by Protect the Adirondacks against the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Adirondack Park Agency (APA). In the end, eight of the twelve judges who looked at the evidence found that Class II trails were unconstitutional.

For two decades, Protect the Adirondacks, its predecessor organizations, and many others, took the position that Class II trails, or anything like them, violated Article 14, Section 1, the forever wild clause of the State Constitution. Few at these state agencies heeded our concerns.

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Friday, July 16, 2021

Forest Ranger Assists With Oregon Wildfire

wildfireA DEC Forest Ranger and expert wildland firefighter is being deployed today to assist with efforts to contain the Bootleg Fire in the Fremont-Winema region of Oregon. Nearly every year, New York State deploys its highly trained wildland firefighters to help battle fires in western states.

This is DEC’s first wildland firefighting deployment after 2020’s busy fire season,” DEC Commissioner Seggos said. “As climate change continues to drive wildfires that threaten communities throughout the West, New York State stands ready to assist our fellow states with expertise that our firefighters then bring back home to help with future emergency responses.”

The DEC Forest Ranger will join a crew of federal, state, and local fire agencies battling the Bootleg Fire in Oregon.

In 1979, New York sent its first firefighting crew to assist western states with large wildfires. On average, one or two crews have been sent as needed to assist with wildfires every year since. In addition to helping contain wildfires and minimize damage, these crews gain valuable experience that can be utilized fighting wildfires and managing all-risk incidents in New York.

In 2020, DEC Forest Rangers led four 10-person wildland firefighting crews to western states to aid in the national wildfire suppression effort. Each crew consisted of a Forest Ranger crew boss, four additional Forest Rangers, and five volunteer DEC employees with wildland firefighter training. Crews were assigned to a firefighting task for two weeks. In addition, several Forest Rangers were deployed as Incident Command Specialists to various fires throughout the country, including the record fires in California.

All personnel and travel expenses for the New York crews are either paid directly by the U.S. Forest Service or reimbursed to New York State based on a mutual aid agreement between states and federal land agencies.

Photo: Wildland firefighting techniques used in Colorado from 2020. DEC photo


Friday, July 16, 2021

Outdoor conditions (7/16): Poke-O trail closed today

outdoor conditions logoThe following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

Taylor Pond Wild Forest: The Poke-O-Moonshine trail in the Taylor Pond Wild Forest will be closed on Friday, July 16 to allow for the safe delivery of trail work materials by helicopter. DEC thanks users for their patience while we complete this important work. Hikers are encouraged to explore other nearby hikes, including Catamount Mountain, Silver Lake Mountain, and trails in the Split Rock Mountain Wild Forest.

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Friday, July 16, 2021

Latest news headlines

Here’s a look at news from around the Adirondacks this week:

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Thursday, July 15, 2021

John Brown Farm and New York’s Voter Suppression History

voter suppressionThis year we are celebrating New York State’s acquisition of John Brown Farm 125 years ago.  And it is good that we are.

But let us also recall a 200th Anniversary linked to the John Brown Farm – a connection that has particular importance this year as we witness a voter suppression spree around our country.  Two hundred years ago, that was us–our New York ancestors–enacting explicit rules to keep blacks from voting.

John Brown and his family came here to the Adirondacks as part of an effort to counteract New York State-sponsored suppression of voting rights for black men.

We are now seeing a wave of voter suppression efforts in states controlled by Republican legislators fearful of losing their majority power.  Well, guess what?  That’s exactly what was going on here in good old New York back in the early 1800’s.  We New Yorkers apparently were leaders in voter suppression.  We even put it into the state constitution!  That’s more than the states are doing today.

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