Monday, September 13, 2021

Eat Local for Less with AdkAction’s Fair Food Pricing

adk action fair food pricing sign

AdkAction is currently enrolling households in a program designed to help subsidize the cost of locally produced food for families in the North Country. Households who enroll in the Fair Food Pricing program receive 30% off at participating vendors. In times of personal or collective crisis, the discount can temporarily be increased to 90% to provide even more support to households in need.

Eligibility for the program is based on United Way’s ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) guidelines for income and household size. For example, a two-adult household with two children in childcare, earning an annual income of $78,000 – or a single senior earning $30,400 – is eligible to join the program.

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Sunday, September 12, 2021

When Flowers Sleep (or Are They Just Pretending?)

flowers

Like the bees, once the temperature gets to 50 degrees and above my husband and I are outside on the move.  Its not hard to notice the changes in the view from morning to evening when you spend nearly 80 percent of your time in nature like we do.  In the morning the wild flowers are on display, bringing life and a multitude color to a mountain landscape but in the evening the once vibrant petals close and shades of green take over.

Have these flowers become sleepy and fallen into a slumber and if they’re not sleeping, why have they closed for the night?

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Sunday, September 12, 2021

DEC, USFWS to Collect Atlantic Salmon on Lake Champlain Tributaries

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Zach Eisenhauer holds an 11-pound salmon that he trapped on the Boquet River on Oct. 6 during a fish surveyData Collection Supports Evaluation of Restoration Efforts

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today announced a joint project with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to collect adult Atlantic salmon from major New York tributaries of Lake Champlain this fall. This work supports the State’s ongoing research and management of the fishery.

DEC and the USFWS will use various techniques to capture returning adult Atlantic salmon from the Saranac, Bouquet, and Ausable rivers through November. Fish captured as part of this effort will be examined and released back to the river where they were captured. Researchers will collect data on at least 80 fish per river to aid in assessing current stocking methods and the success of various genetic strains DEC and USFWS are assessing for improved survival.

Collection efforts will have minimal effect on recreational fishing but anglers should be aware of these efforts and avoid nets marked with orange buoys. Fishing tackle can get caught in the nets and impact the ability of this equipment to effectively capture fish, biasing the results of the study.

For more information about Atlantic salmon, go to DEC’s website.

Photo: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Zach Eisenhauer holds an 11-pound salmon he trapped on the Bouquet River during a 2017 salmon survey.


Sunday, September 12, 2021

Weekly news round up

A collection of interesting reads:

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Saturday, September 11, 2021

My Loon Friend: A Story of Trust and Healing 

loonBy Ronni Tichenor 

We have a camp on the south shore of 4th Lake, in the Fulton Chain, and early one  morning in August, I was on our dock practicing my yoga. I was about to release my Down Dog  position, when movement on the water caught my eye. It was a loon, less than ten feet off the  dock, swimming slowly by. I froze, fearing that any movement would scare it and cause it to  dive, which meant I could not see very clearly because, in my head-down position, my hair hung  over my face. The loon appeared to have a fish in its mouth—but then I thought I could see little  legs on the side, so I said, “No—it’s a crawfish.” We had seen a couple of loon families in the  previous days, so I thought the loon was delivering breakfast to someone. Once it had swum  away, my husband came down to the dock. He had been up at the house, watching from a  distance. “Wow,” he said, “that was so close.” We went on about our day—he went for a bike  ride, I went for a walk. 

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Saturday, September 11, 2021

Spirit of Generosity: Great Futures

Akwesasne Boys & Girls Club

“Your future is created by what you do today.”

This simple message appears in the entryway of the Akwesasne Boys & Girls Club — it’s also a through-line of our summer-long Spirit of Generosity series: making the decision to give back, even in a small way, has ripple effects that can last for generations.

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Saturday, September 11, 2021

Poem: Breathe

breathe

Author’s Note:  Greetings. I just wanted to take a moment to thank everyone. Your reads, RETWEETS, FACEBOOK shares, compliments & comments have all been so all greatly appreciated. I especially want to thank Editor Melissa Hart & all the great folks at Adirondack Explorer & here at The Adirondack Almanack. I have truly enjoyed the opportunity they have given me to share some of my adventures & stories with all of you.

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Friday, September 10, 2021

‘If Allowed to Continue at Present Rates’

Here are a few excerpts from past Adirondack conferences preparing audiences for climate change, severe weather events, and consequences.

Photo: Post Hurricane Irene streambank and instream restoration efforts on the E. Branch Ausable River. Photo by Dave Gibson

September, 1989: George Woodwell, global ecologist and then director of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, from an address at the Ausable Club, St. Hubert’s, Keene:

By cutting vast tracts of the world’s forests without replacement, humans are seriously adding to the atmospheric pool of CO2 and diminishing the natural background modulating effect of the earth’s lungs – our forests. A 25% increase in atmospheric CO2 since the mid-19th century, if allowed to continue at present rates, will have a severe impact on our climate. It, in addition to even more dramatic increases in methane and other greenhouse gases, will inevitably lead to global warming and climatic changes on a large scale. Ecological and societal changes, many of which may drastically affect the Adirondack Park, are sure to follow.

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Friday, September 10, 2021

DEC Adopts New Rules for Deer and Bear Hunting

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC)  announced that DEC has adopted new rules for deer and bear hunting in New York. Rule changes include extending hunting hours and dress code requirements when afield to improve hunter safety.

DEC announced the proposed changes in June 2021, after adopting the updated New York State Deer Management Plan. After careful review of the public comments received on the proposed changes, DEC adopted the rules as proposed. A summary of the public comments received and DEC’s response is available on the DEC website and in the latest issue of the New York State Register.

The adopted changes:

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Friday, September 10, 2021

Outdoor conditions (9/10): Current closures

outdoor conditions logoThe following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

Saranac Lakes Wild Forest: The upper locks on the Saranac River (between Middle and Lower Saranac Lakes) are now self-operated for the fall. The lower locks (between Second Pond and Oseetah Lake) will be manned with a lock tender 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. daily. Locks can be manually operated in the off hours.

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Friday, September 10, 2021

Latest News Headlines

Here’s a look at news from around the Adirondacks this week:

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Thursday, September 9, 2021

Those cedar logs

“Adirondack lean-tos are so much more than simple cedar log structures built in the woods.”

lean-to

 The Bull Rush Bay lean-to is scheduled some time later this month to be demolished and replaced.”

     This news hit me like a heavy weight title fight sucker punch in the gut. I’ve been barely able to catch my breath since I first heard this news in a reader comment to my most recent Adirondack Almanack story, “Smoke on the Water,” posted just last week.

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Thursday, September 9, 2021

Adirondack Park Institute’s Annual Awards Gala raises funds for nature programs

finished canoe

NEWCOMB, NY – The Adirondack Park Institute is pleased to announce that local businesswoman and philanthropist Caroline Draper Lussi will be awarded the 2021 Frank M. Hutchins Environmental Education Leadership Award at its Annual Awards Gala on September 17, 2021, 5:00-6:00 p.m.

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Thursday, September 9, 2021

Adirondack Council: Park has become a ‘wilderness of refuge’

Adirondaack Council reportThe remote, peaceful and serene wilderness areas of the Adirondack Park have become a place of refuge for millions of New Yorkers and others seeking a respite from the troubles of a rapidly changing world, according to the Adirondack Council’s annual State of the Park report.

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Wednesday, September 8, 2021

Father, son busted for illegal Bald Mountain campfire

forest ranger reportsRecent NYS DEC Forest Ranger actions:

Town of North Elba
Essex County
Wilderness Rescue:
 On Aug. 30 at 11:52 a.m., Forest Rangers Evans and Lewis responded to a dropped 911 call reporting a 60-year-old man from Missouri had suffered a knee injury on the Jackrabbit Trail. The Rangers responded to the location, splinted the subject’s leg, and evacuated him using a UTV. By 2:30 p.m., Rangers had returned the subject to the trailhead and transferred him to Lake Placid Volunteer Ambulance Squad.

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