Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Lost in the Boreas Country: Herbert Short, 1930 (Conclusion)

Word of the manhunt for Herbert Short had reached both Auburn and Dannemora prisons, and soon after, searchers were joined by a team of 20 corrections officers from Dannemora. For them the effort was deeply personal: they were, after all, desperately hoping to find their good friend alive and well.

But he had gone missing on November 5, and an estimated 100 searchers had found nothing after several days. On November 9, Tremaine Hughes, a pilot among the state troopers’ ranks, took to the air in what was described as the first aerial effort by the police on a missing-person mission. Heavy bags of clothes and food were sent aloft, to be dropped if Short were sighted. But the effort proved fruitless. Searchers on the ground said they could hear the plane at times, but the woods were so thick that, even without leaves on the trees, they couldn’t see Hughes circling above them. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 31, 2018

David Brunner, Joe Martens Join Adk Land Trust Board

Adirondack Land TrustDavid Brunner and Joe Martens have joined the board of directors of the Adirondack Land Trust.

David Brunner, of Au Sable Forks, owns and operates Asgaard Farm & Dairy with his wife, Rhonda Butler. Asgaard was the home of artist Rockwell Kent from the 1920s until his death in 1971. Brunner and Butler acquired the farm in 1988. After working to restore the land and buildings, they put the former dairy farm back into production in 2003. Today Asgaard is known for award-winning goat cheeses and pastured meats, including beef, pork and poultry. Brunner worked previously in finance with BNP Paribas. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, January 31, 2018

‘Born to Rewild’ Doc Showing At Whallonsburg Grange

born to rewildThe Champlain Valley Film Series will present the documentary film Born To Rewild, on Saturday, February 3 at 7:30 pm at the Whallonsburg Grange Hall, 1610 NYS Route 22 in Essex.

This documentary follows Essex resident John Davis on TrekWest, his 5,000 mile, 8-month journey along the Continental Divide from the deserts of Sonora, Mexico to the snow-covered peaks of British Columbia.

John Davis will be at the screening to introduce the film and answer questions. Davis is also the author of Big, Wild, and Connected: Scouting the Eastern Wildway from Florida to Quebec, about his 7,500 mile journey to follow the potential path of an eastern wildlife corridor.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Gibson: Proposal for Boreas Ponds Falls Short

boreas ponds classification mapOne could almost hear the exhalation of relief by environmentalists when they learned this week that the Governor’s DEC and APA had decided on “Alternative 2 B” for the Boreas Ponds State Land classification.

Large, obvious violations of law were to be avoided, so they learned. Fears held over the past year were apparently allayed. There would be no unclassified area reserved for a future glamorous camping (“glamping”) in the interior, and no bicycle route on vanishing old roads cloaked by balsam fir leading north towards White Lily Pond and the High Peaks Wilderness. Under “2B” the Boreas Ponds themselves at 1200 feet elevation would be incorporated in that Wilderness, as would the boreal forest stretching north to 3,700 feet and the existing High Peaks Wilderness border. Motorized and mechanized access would end at the Boreas Ponds Dam, eight miles in from county highway, or Blue Ridge Road.

I confess I exhaled as well. After all, one year ago the Governor had declared in his State of the State that there would be infrastructure developed and a Hut to Hut program installed in the Boreas Ponds tract. Rumors of a long “Wild Forest corridor” to allow biking far to the north of the Ponds abounded. Wilderness advocates had dodged a bullet, it seemed. A Solomon-like compromise of Wilderness and Wild Forest access to the Ponds had been reached, or so it seemed. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 30, 2018

APA Agenda: Land Classifications, Saranac Power Line

APA Building in Ray Brook NYThe Adirondack Park Agency (APA) will hold its monthly meeting at its headquarters in Ray Brook, NY on Thursday, February 1st, and Friday, February 2nd, 2018.

The meeting will discuss rebuilding a transmission line in Saranac, the State Land Classification Package, and will begin deliberation of the Boreas Ponds Tract classification. On Friday the Agency is expected to vote on a resolution for the Boreas Ponds Tract.

What follows is the agenda issued by the APA: » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Empire State Winter Games Begin Feb 1st

eswg rail jamThe 38th annual Empire State Winter Games are set to kick off on Thursday, February 1 and will run until Sunday, February 4 around the Adirondack region. More than 2,500 participants are expected to compete in 17 different sports during the three-day multi-sport festival.

The event gives amateur athletes the opportunity to compete in world-class Olympic venues in more than 30 events. The Games will kick off with an inaugural Torch Relay departing from New York City. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Olympic-Themed Events, Activity Set For Lake Placid

lake placid villageThe village of Lake Placid will be celebrating its long Olympic history throughout the month of February with  Olympic themed food and drink specials, village decorations, and a Jumbotron on near the Olympic Center showing Olympic competitions daily. » Continue Reading.


Monday, January 29, 2018

Rare Blue Supermoon Lunar Eclipse January 31st

blue moonOn the night of December 3, 2017, a moon rose that was unlike any other of the year. Not only was it full, but it was at the closest point to earth during its orbit.

Astronomers refer to this orbital proximity as perigee – a word with Greek origins that means “close to the earth” – thus this full moon was a perigean full moon. Of course the phenomenon is more commonly known as a supermoon, a term coined in 1979, not by an astronomer, but by an astrologer named Richard Nolle. By his definition, a supermoon is a full or new moon that comes within 224,000 miles of the earth. (The average distance is 238,000 miles.) » Continue Reading.


Monday, January 29, 2018

Depot Theatre Announces Main Stage Line-Up

Three hits from the past 39 years are set to headline the Depot Theatre’s 40th Anniversary Season.

The main stage season was selected by the Depot’s Producing Director, Kevin Cochran, whose choices were inspired by an informal survey of audiences last year. » Continue Reading.


Monday, January 29, 2018

Saranac Chamber Names New President

saranac lake chamber of commerceThe Saranac Lake Area Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors has selected Keith Braun to serve as its president.

Braun has served on the board since 2014 as the representative for Paul Smith’s College, where he serves as Director of Admissions. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 28, 2018

Bauer: Making The Boreas Ponds Compromise

News about the state’s decision on the classification of the 21,000-acre Boreas Ponds tract, part of a larger 54,000-acre classification package released by the Adirondack Park Agency (APA), has been met with a spectrum of cheers and some jeers.

The decision is clearly a compromise, and as with any good compromise there was give and take, with things in it that people both support and oppose. As we evaluate this historic turn of events in the days before the APA takes up deliberations on February 1st and 2nd, it’s worth taking stock of the making of this compromise. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 28, 2018

CSAs: Taking Control, Ownership of Our Food System

CSA veggiesIn this age of global markets and marketing, more often than not, the food we eat is grown on large industrial farms; then shipped across the country, or from central or South America, or overseas, to huge distribution centers, where it’s sorted, packaged, processed, and then trucked to chain supermarkets, convenient stores, and fast food outlets.

We seldom think about the environmental impacts resulting from expanded mechanization and transportation of foodstuffs over great distances; of the ecological consequences of large-scale mono-cropping of food with intensive use of pesticides; or the impacts that food globalization has on our health (e.g. 2/3 of Americans are now considered overweight or obese). » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 28, 2018

Adirondack Forest-Tent Caterpillars

Forest Tent CaterpillarWinter is not a season when many people think about tents, except maybe to be glad they do not live in one. I do have some friends who love winter camping, and the fact they have never extended an invitation is evidence of how much they value our friendship.

Oddly enough, winter is a crucial time to look for signs of forest-tent caterpillars (FTC). In spite of their name, FTC do not weave a silken tent-like nest like the eastern-tent caterpillar and other species of tent caterpillars. The tent-less lifestyle of forest-tent caterpillars makes it harder to spot outbreaks in spring. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 27, 2018

Living A Wood-Burning Life

fireplace At about 9 am on an overcast November Saturday, a group gathered at the edge of the local dump.

They sipped coffee, pulled on gloves, and adjusted ear protectors. Then they started to work. There were loggers, tree care experts, high school students, police officers, doctors, farmers, and lawyers. There were whole families, a guy on crutches, a few dogs, a legislator or two. By day’s end, they had cut and stacked more than 21 cords of firewood, and delivered most of it to the homes of their neighbors. What was left would be available throughout the winter to anyone with an unexpected need for fuel and a way to burn it. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 27, 2018

Sandra Weber: Politics of a Water Lily

waldenI enjoy a somewhat Thoreau-like existence, living in a cabin in the Adirondack woods about a mile from a small town. This frugal, fairly self-sustaining lifestyle means plenty of physical labor and ample quiet time for writing. Like Henry David Thoreau, I foolishly thought my immersion into nature might shield me from political matters. I tried to expunge such thoughts by chopping wood but soon found my axe needed grinding.

My world had changed; the forest seemed less attractive, the mountains less appealing, my prose less worthy. As Thoreau wrote, “I dwelt before, perhaps, in the illusion that my life passed somewhere only between heaven and hell, but now I cannot persuade myself that I do not dwell wholly within hell.” » Continue Reading.


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