Thursday, July 16, 2020

Hunting for Health

In recent months, as the coronavirus jumped from bats to people and spread around the globe, the world suddenly seems much smaller. The situation reminds us of our connectedness to the animal world and to each other. Such an awareness of nature is deeply rooted in the Adirondack traditions of hunting and fishing.

The practice of hunting in the Adirondacks stretches back thousands of years. For countless generations, Native American peoples lived in balance with the natural environment, taking only resources needed for survival, and making use of medicinal plants.

From the mid-1800s, growing numbers of tourists came to the Adirondacks to experience the wilderness. They relied on Adirondack guides’ deep knowledge of the woods and waters to explore the wilderness in comfort and safety.

 

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Thursday, July 16, 2020

DEC acquires 662 acres in St. Lawrence, Oneida and Lewis counties

cranberry lakeNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced the acquisition of several parcels totaling 662 acres in St. Lawrence, Oneida, and Lewis counties to enhance public access to a variety of recreational opportunities, including hiking, fishing, snowmobiling, and hunting, as well as to protect critical wetlands and forests in the region.

The acquisition was made possible through cumulative investments of $666,800 from the state Environmental Protection Fund (EPF).

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Thursday, July 16, 2020

Hamilton County orgs collaborate on Covid awareness campaign

Hamilton County Public Health and Nursing Services, Blue Mountain Center and the Town of Long Lake collaborated to help create information signage to be distributed throughout Hamilton County. 

Hamilton County continues to see the lowest number of Covid-19 cases in New York State and the North Country region. The signage collaboration was created as an educational campaign for residents and visitors. Hamilton County communities are committed to the safety of everyone while strategically re-opening local businesses. The signs encourage guests to practice physical distancing and mask wearing to help businesses stay open.

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Thursday, July 16, 2020

Tupper Arts reopens; public invited to participate in art project

Tupper Arts opened its doors on Wednesday, July 15, to host its 47th Annual Art Show and Adirondack Woodcrafts Show. The gallery, located at 106 Park St. in Tupper Lake, has been shuttered since mid-March due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, with multiple precautions in place to ensure the safety of visitors, vendors, and volunteers, the gallery is ready to reopen to the public.

The combined shows will feature the work of local artists and artisans for sale, including paintings in various mediums, photography, and a variety of unique woodcrafts. The gift shop will also be open, and visitors will be able to browse the local art and crafts for sale. Face masks are required, and the volunteers on staff at the Arts Center will ensure that the number of visitors inside the gallery is limited at any one time to allow for appropriate social distancing.  Hours for the show are Wednesdays through Sundays, 12-4 p.m. 

Tupper Arts is also sponsoring “Moose on the Loose,” a community art project. Local artists are invited to paint a plywood cutout of a moose to be auctioned off later this summer. Buyers will be asked to donate the moose to be placed in prominent business areas around Tupper Lake. Interested artists can pick up their moose at 106 Park Street in Tupper Lake any time the Arts Center is open (Wednesday through Sunday, 12-4 p.m.). Proceeds from the sales will go to programs and activities sponsored by Tupper Arts.

More info at tupperarts.org.


Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Uncovering a former scout camp at Chestertown’s Palmer Pond

One of the hikes of the Chester Challenge is the hike around Palmer Pond.  This Palmer Pond is west of Chestertown, about a mile before the Hudson River, up a dirt road, called oddly enough, Palmer Pond Road. (Not to be confused with the Palmer Pond near exit 28 of the Northway near what was formerly Frontier Town.)  The drive up Palmer Pond Road from Rt. 8 is approximately one mile on an increasingly narrower and rougher dirt road that ends in a DEC maintained parking lot. 

Palmer Pond is part of the Lake George Wild Forest. This State owned property has increased in size over the years due to the addition of Finch – Pruyn lands acquired by the State in 2013.  The enlarged parcel actually extends from Palmer Pond (westward) down to the Hudson River (Another story for a different time).

 

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Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Summer Trout Fishing Tips

With warm weather comes a lot of fishing, and for this summer the DEC has released some tips anglers can follow to help keep up the trout population:

  • Avoid catch and release fishing for heat stressed trout. Those that are already weakened by heat stress are at risk of death regardless of how carefully handled they are.
  • Do not disturb trout where they have gathered in unusually high numbers, as it is likely these fish are recovering from heat stress in a pocket of cold water.
  • Fish early in the morning, as stream temperatures are at their coolest then.
  • Have a go to plan B in case water temperatures are too high at your intended destination. Consider a body of water that is less prone to heat stress or fishing for a more heat tolerant species, like small mouth bass.

If you follow these tips you can fish while remaining conscientious about your environment and ensure healthy trout for generations to come.


Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Ranger report: Injuries; lost hikers; in the dark without a headlamp

Recent DEC Forest Ranger actions:

Town of Keene
Essex County
Wilderness Rescue:
 On July 12 at 10:50 a.m., DEC’s Ray Brook Dispatch received a call reporting an injured hiker on Upper Wolfjaw in the Eastern High Peaks. The caller stated he saw a 25-year-old man from Queensbury hiking solo with a knee injury from a fall on wet tree roots. Forest Rangers Kevin Burns, Tom Gliddi, Robbi Mecus, and Scott van Laer and two Assistant Forest Rangers responded. At 3:10 p.m., Ranger Mecus located the injured man just below the summit of Upper Wolfjaw, assessed the injury, and determined a hoist mission was necessary. NYSP Aviation found a break in the cloud cover at 3:50 p.m., and responded to their location for assistance. The hiker was hoisted into the helicopter at 4:10 p.m. by Ranger Burns and transported to a local hospital for further medical treatment.

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Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Monitoring for European Cherry Fruit Fly – You Can Help

I love cherries! Especially sweet cherries. They’re delicious fresh, high in fiber, and loaded with vitamins, minerals, and beneficial antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds, which may lower your risk of developing certain cancers, heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and/or obesity.

Growing consumer education about the antioxidant health benefits of cherries appears to be creating increased demand for the fruit. Domestic cherry consumption in the United States is now around 2 pounds per person per year.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 14, 2020

The cycle of killing habituated bears continues

black bearSeveral campsites and lean-tos were temporarily closed in the High Peaks Wilderness on July 5 due to an aggressive black bear that had been roaming the area looking for human food.

A day later the state Department of Environmental Conservation captured and later killed the animal.

As DEC officials have often said to me in these situations, “A fed bear is a dead bear.”

What does that mean? It means if a bear gets food from humans too many times, it will get habituated to the food. The bear will then continue to seek out food from campers, especially when natural food sources aren’t available such as during dry years. In some cases, the bear will then get too close to people and be considered dangerous. In these situations, bears don’t win. Instead, they are killed.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Water, water everywhere, but still the need to conserve

Colleen rows the boat on Long Lake by Alexandra RoalsvigWhile recent rains have helped some parts of the Adirondacks, other parts are stuck in a dry spell that began with the mild winter.

On Tuesday, the Town of Long Lake told residents to stop washing their cars and watering their lawns to conserve water.

Long Lake’s water superintendent, Keith Austin, said a dry spell left the town unable to keep up with current demand. The system serves about 800 full-time residents and a seasonal population of 2,000 people in a typical year.

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Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Proposed Rule Change for waterfowl hunting

duck decoys

Due to a slow, but steady decline in mallards across the northeastern United States, the mallard daily bag limit remains two birds (one hen) per day. Please see the Declining Mallards in the Atlantic Flyway (PDF) brochure for more information.

The Canada goose season length in the Northeast, West Central, East Central, Hudson Valley, and Lake Champlain zones remains 30 days with a limit of two per day. Please see the Status and Management of Atlantic Population Canada Geese (PDF) brochure for more information.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 14, 2020

NYers fear return of virus in latest Siena poll

coronavirusSixty-two percent of New Yorkers think that the worst of the coronavirus pandemic is still to come while only 27 percent think that the worst is over according to a new statewide survey of residents released Monday by the Siena College Research Institute (SCRI).

By 70-22 percent, residents prefer the government’s priority be containing the spread of the coronavirus, even if it hurts the economy, rather than restarting the economy, even if it increases the risk to public health.

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Monday, July 13, 2020

How the Honey Pot is Filled

Honey is the only food made by an insect that is eaten both by humans and the insect itself.  Bears, badgers and other animals also eat honey and have long been raiding the winter stores of their winged friends to harvest this tasty treat. 

Honey is a very stable food that naturally resists molds, fungi and other bacteria, allowing it to last for years without refrigeration.  It is well known that honey is made by a colony of honey bees living in a nest or in a hive if kept by a beekeeper.

A typical bee hive will house about 60,000 bees, most of them workers, industriously making honey and the honeycombs in which the honey is stored.  That’s a lot of honey bees, working very hard to produce honey for the colony.  It takes about 556 foraging bees to visit 2 million flowers, just to make a pound of honey!

» Continue Reading.


Monday, July 13, 2020

NY State Parks Explorer App

New York State Parks has kicked off the 2020 summer season by launching a “New York State Parks Explorer” mobile app, available for free on both iOS and Android devices.

The new app will provide visitors and potential visitors with helpful information regarding a variety of destinations and activities around New York States parks and historical sites. Some key highlights of the app are as follows:

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Monday, July 13, 2020

Registration open for the Great Adirondack Garage Sale

The Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism and local leaders are encouraging residents to register for the 10th annual Great Adirondack Garage Sale. Traditionally held each Memorial Day Weekend, the sale this year will take place on Aug. 7, 8, and 9.

The garage sale stretches over 150 miles through the Adirondacks, and includes residents in the towns of Old Forge, Inlet, Raquette Lake, Indian Lake, Blue Mountain Lake, Long Lake, Tupper Lake, Cranberry Lake, Piercefield, Newcomb, and Speculator. An interactive website showcases sale locations and allows unlimited photos of the items for sale to be uploaded.

Registration is free, and listings on the website include dates and times for each sale. Each community will also receive paper maps of local sale locations to hand out. To register and for more information, go to www.GreatAdirondackGarageSale.com.



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Support the Adirondack Almanack and the Adirondack Explorer all year long with a monthly gift that fits your budget.