Tuesday, June 23, 2020

National Pollinator Week: Who are the pollinators?

Pollinators are animals and insects that carry pollen from one plant to another. Pollinators are responsible for much of our food and flowers and are responsible for the reproduction of 1 out of every 3 bites of food we eat.   In order to understand pollinators, we need to know a little bit about plants.

Just like animals, flowering plants need to mate. But how can an organism spread its genes without being able to meet up with others of its species and this is where pollinators come in.  Pollinators are animals of all types that visit flowers and take away their pollen. Pollen is a sex cell of plants and is essential for reproduction. As pollinators move from flower to flower, they deposit the collected pollen, basically allowing the plants to mate. 

Many flowers attract insects and animals with the promise of a sugary liquid called nectar.  Their smell and bright petals advertise fresh nectar to passing insects and other flying pollinators like hummingbirds.  In return for the gift of nectar, the flower deposits pollen on whatever comes to visit.  Pollen is like the sperm of plants – and is the way that plants spread their genes and mate with other plants in the same species.

Pollinators come in all shapes and sizes and include species of insects, birds, and mammals. 

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 23, 2020

Great Camp Sagamore’s Annual Gala goes virtual

This week, Great Camp Sagamore is hosting a virtual gala and online auction. They ask that you join them while they pay tribute to music, and the artists who make it. You can register for free at the following link: https://e.givesmart.com/events/hgG/.

The online auction will culminate on June 24 with live, real-time countdown auctioneer Doug Stinson and special guests from 7:30  to 8 p.m. Also, tune into their website daily to hear a musical tribute to a Great Camp Sagamore honoree.


Tuesday, June 23, 2020

Fish for Free June 27-28

A Free Fishing Weekend is coming up June 27 – 28. The event is the second of six free fishing days offered in New York State every year. New York residents and non-residents are permitted to fish for free without a fishing license. Free fishing day participants are reminded that although the requirement for a fishing license is waived during free fishing days, all other fishing regulations remain in effect.

DEC encourages all anglers, new and experienced, to recreate locally and seek out fishing opportunities close to home. DEC’s Places to Fish webpages are a reliable source for those ready to plan their next fishing trip. For beginning anglers interested in getting started, the I FISH NY Beginners’ Guide to Freshwater Fishing provides information on everything from rigging up a fishing rod, to identifying your catch, and understanding fishing regulations.

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Tuesday, June 23, 2020

Au Sable Forks’ Tahawus Center marks 10 year anniversary

Described as “an exciting new gem of a space” by the Lake Placid Visitors Bureau when it opened it Main Street Windows Gallerys, the Tahawus Center created a gallery for dynamic artists’ displays. The over 100-year old historic Tahawus building is situated on Rt 9N Main St, near the scenic Ausable River, in Au Sable Forks, Town of Jay, NY. By initially repurposing the storefront as an art gallery, Tahawus Cultural Center began to bring programming and creative curb appeal to a former Masonic lodge building which had lain dormant for decades.

The Windows Gallery presented its inaugural solo exhibit in January 2011 by local photographer Mark Hobson. Exhibits followed with works by Arto Monaco (pictured here), Rockwell Kent, photographer Todd Bissonette, a show of Detroit / Au Sable Forks artists curated by William Dilworth, “Mohawk of the Adirondacks,”curated by Margaret Horn, and “Here Come the Trains,” engineered by Lou Scavo and Carl Kokes.

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Monday, June 22, 2020

The paths to Past and Present Constitutional Changes to the Forest Preserve

Editor’s note: This is Part 1 in a five-part series that will run over the next few weeks.

Article 14, Section 1, of the New York Constitution, the famed “Forever Wild” provision, has been amended 16 times since 1938. It has been amended five times since 2007, making this period the most active and intensive in Forest Preserve history for amendments.

Several Article 14, Section 1 proposed amendments are being drafted and organized by the Department of Environmental Conservation and Cuomo Administration that focus on bringing the Mt. Van Hoevenberg Winter Sports Complex (pictured here) into compliance with Article 14, removing the former Camp Gabriels prison complex from the Forest Preserve, and for locating an emergency communications tower on, and possibly providing public access, to Cathead Mountain in southern Hamilton County, which would involve neighboring Forest Preserve.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, June 22, 2020

National Pollinator Week 2020

The Adirondack Pollinator Project (APP) is once again celebrating National Pollinator Week, June 22-28, to highlight the critical importance of pollinators to biodiversity, food availability, and the economy. Pollinators help produce approximately 1/3 of the food we eat. In New York State alone, bees and other pollinators provide some $350 million in pollination services each year. This year’s programs are being delivered digitally.

The Adirondack Pollinator Project is a project of AdkAction in partnership with The Wild Center, The Lake Placid Land Conservancy, and Paul Smith’s College, with the mission of inspiring individual and collective action to help pollinators thrive. Creative digital program offerings throughout National Pollinator Week will allow people of all ages to learn about pollinators, gardening with native plants, and more.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, June 22, 2020

‘A Woman’s Place’ virtual book reading

finding a womans placeAuthor (and Almanack contributor) Lorraine Duvall will read from her latest book, Finding A Woman’s Place: The Story of a 1970s Feminist Collective in the Adirondacks in a virtual event taking place from 5-6 p.m. Wednesday via Zoom. The event is sponsored by the Caldwell-Lake George Library and the Richards Library in Warrensburg. (Click here for an Adirondack Explorer article about the book)

Duvall will share the fascinating history of a women’s community in Athol, NY (Warren County) which served as a safe harbor for hundreds of women during the tumultuous times of the second wave of feminism in the 1970s. 

Forty-six years ago, seven women left behind the lives they knew and created this commune deep in the Adirondack Mountains that they called “A Woman’s Place.” From 1974 to 1982 A Woman’s Place served as a refuge for self-discovery that changed the lives of hundreds of women.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, June 22, 2020

ROOST Launches Community Jumpstart

The Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism is launching a Community Jumpstart initiative, which is intended to bring local businesses into the spotlight and encourage their patrons to enjoy their favorite spots.

ROOST is promoting businesses that are reopening post COVID-19 and expanding their operations in order to ease the transition into Phase 3, and later reopenings to come. Discounts, stay-cation packages, and featured products are all being offered. Businesses of all types are encouraged to participate and there is no charge for doing so.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 21, 2020

HISTORICAL PROFILE: Treadway Mountain of the Pharaoh Lake Wilderness

Treadway Mountain is a 2,244-foot peak located in the Town of Ticonderoga in Essex County, about two miles west of Putnam Pond. Although not as popular a hiking destination as its big brother to the southwest, Pharaoh Mountain, I consider it a gem of the Adirondack wilderness which offers a big bang for the effort to reach the summit.

A portion of the 2019 U.S.G.S. Graphite, N.Y. quadrangle map showing Treadway Mountain and Putnam Pond.

Although there are three routes up to the peak, I have always started from the Putnam Pond Campground on the trail which heads towards Clear Pond. The hike along the open sections rock and moss, marked with cairns, is an enjoyable one, especially in the fall and winter. You will climb over stretches of beautiful rose quartz as you approach the summit. From the well-open summit, you can venture around and check out a panorama which exhibits the High Peaks, Pharaoh Lake, and the Green Mountains of Vermont.

This historical profile presents the first in-depth discussion of the history surrounding Treadway Mountain, primarily the origin of its name. I also discuss the gentlemen from Ticonderoga for whom it was named and their involvement in the affairs of the town.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 21, 2020

The Sembrich Announces New 20/20: Virtual Visionaries Summer Festival 

BOLTON LANDING – The Sembrich has announced the launch of its 20/20: Virtual Visionaries Summer Festival. Artistic Director Richard Wargo has reimagined the original 20/20: Musical Visionaries Summer Festival into a series of eight carefully curated digital presentations. The online festival will explore visionary musicians including Percy Grainger and Marcella Sembrich. Presentations will be released for complimentary viewing and streaming throughout the summer. 

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 21, 2020

Weigh in on DEC’s trout plan by June 25

The DEC is looking for the public’s input on itsWoman angler with brown trout Draft Fisheries Management Plan for Inland Trout Streams in New York State (Plan). The purpose of the Plan is to guide the efforts and resources of  DEC toward managing New York’s trout stream fisheries according to their ecological and recreational potential.

The Plan was written to communicate what outcomes the DEC will strive to achieve while managing for a diversity of fishing experiences and providing anglers with the means to find those experiences. Plan objectives and strategies address the management of both wild and stocked trout, habitat enhancement and protection, public access, and outreach.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 21, 2020

Weekly news roundup


Saturday, June 20, 2020

Tracking the salt

snow plow courtesy DOTOver the past several months, as we’ve investigated road salt pollution in homeowners’ water, we’ve been keeping an eye out for lab tests that show salt getting into town and village water supplies.

It stood to reason that since road salt can run off roads into private wells, it could also get into water supplies used by larger public drinking water systems.

But tracking the spread of salt is complicated because of uneven testing by public water systems across upstate New York. The state’s Department of Health decides which contaminants public water suppliers have to test for each year.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 20, 2020

Happy Father’s Day and Happy Solstice!

Happy Father’s Day weekend and happy start of summer. In recognition of both, I’ve pulled a few related stories from the Almanack archive to share:

Frog Jumping Contest: Even though this year’s event is sadly canceled due to COVID-19, Diane Chase wrote about this fun annual “Frog Jumping Contest” typically held on Father’s Day. This popular Old Forge tradition is approaching its 50th anniversary. From 2018: https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2018/06/forty-six-years-of-frog-jumping-fathers-days.html.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 20, 2020

DEC studies fisher populations

Fisher provided by DECDEC staff, in partnership with researchers from SUNY ESF, are conducting a study to better understand what drives changes in fisher populations in the Central Adirondacks specifically, and more widely across the Northern Zone.

With the help of a number of trappers, fishers are live-captured during the winter and adult females fitted with GPS collars to locate and monitor dens and kit production. The combination of real-time GPS location data, as well as trail cameras deployed at maternal den sites, help estimate kit production and survival.

Ultimately, DEC will use data on the reproductive potential of Northern Zone fisher populations and gain a better understanding of population dynamics.

For more information on fishers and their management in New York, visit DEC’s website.



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Support the Adirondack Almanack and the Adirondack Explorer all year long with a monthly gift that fits your budget.