Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Fort Ticonderoga embarks on 2020 Digital Campaign

Due to their delayed 2020 summer opening, Fort Ticonderoga is launching a virtual campus.

The “2020 Digital Campaign” features a series of lectures, interactive programming, and a preview of what will be onsite come the Fort’s re-opening to the public later this year.

A schedule of the digital offerings is as follows:

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Good Ole Route 28: A trip that used to be a journey

raquette lake

 

We take roads for granted. I sure did as a kid riding from Syracuse up to my Grandma and Grandpa’s house in Blue Mountain Lake. We drove on Friday nights with my parents and eight brothers and sisters, all stuffed into a station wagon (they were like minivans in 1960s and 70s). My grandfather told us stories about when he was a kid and Route 28 did not exist!

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Mountains of News: Explorer magazine preview

If you’re an Adirondack Explorer subscriber, I hope you already have your copy of our May/June issue, or will receive it in the next few days. I believe this particular issue — produced, as it was, in the difficult and remote world we all find ourselves in these days — speaks better than I can about the direction we’re heading as a magazine and a newsgathering organization.

As always, it’s pretty, for which we thank not only the mountains but also the best photographers and designers in them. And there’s plenty of outdoorsy recreation, including a favorite and remote hike, the allure of bushwhacking, and breathtaking rock climbing.

But this issue is also full of the type of reporting that we’ve worked to enhance over the last couple of years. Water reporter Ry Rivard’s investigation of the difficulties that Adirondackers and upstate New Yorkers face in holding the state accountable for road salt pollution adds an important untold layer to one of the North Country’s most pressing environmental stories. Elsewhere this month, he checks in on how we’re doing vs. the older menace of acid rain — and why it’s not yet time to declare victory.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, May 4, 2020

A day for giving

Over the past few weeks and months, our Adirondack region, the nation and the entire world have been coming together to stand up, help out, give back, and heal.

In recent weeks, the Adirondack Explorer and its companion site, the Adirondack Almanack, have kept you up to date with stories of some of this good happening in our community,  like these COVID-19 response grants and emergency food baskets of locally made meals, as well as the effects on daily life. We also started a list of Adirondack attractions, camps and events that sadly won’t be happening this summer.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, May 4, 2020

Humanities New York offers Emergency Relief Grants

Humanities New York has released new grant guidelines for distribution of “CARES act” funding for New York cultural non-profits affected by COVID-19.
Almost $1,000,000 will be awarded in $5000 to $20,000 grants in order to be distributed to every region of New York. The HNY CARES emergency relief grants complement the NEH CARES act, which offers relief grants of up to $300,000 available to larger organizations across New York, as well as the rest of the country. HNY CARES will be primarily awarded to organizations with a humanities focus.

To view the application guidelines for the grants, please visit https://humanitiesny.org/our-work/emergency-grants/. The deadline for application is May 15, and applicants will be notified of the results by June 15.


Monday, May 4, 2020

Adirondack Health Expands COVID-19 Testing

Adirondack HealthIn accordance with the state health department, Adirondack Medical Center has expanded testing the public for COVID-19, as stated in a press release from Adirondack Health Communications Director Matt Scollin. The testing clinic has expanded to include those with orders from their provider, as well as any of the 40 categories of essential workers. In order to be tested for COVID-19, speak with your primary care provider to have them order a test. If this is not an option for you, you may directly contact the COVID-19 clinic to make an appointment between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. To do so, call 518-897-2462.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, May 4, 2020

North Country Chamber hosts virtual job fair

In place of their annual live event, the North Country Chamber of Commerce will be hosting a virtual job fair this month. Throughout a three week campaign, potential employees will be directed to the Chamber’s Now Hiring/Virtual Job Fair Page, where job seekers will be able to find offerings and links to applications.

If you are a business that wants to take part in this virtual job fair, email Becky Drollette at [email protected] with your company’s name, position available, and website and contact information.


Sunday, May 3, 2020

Local history project marks 160 audio stories

Adirondack storytellers have recorded 160 first-person accounts about life in the Town of Keene, yesterday and today, and there are opportunities for all to participate in this Keene Valley Library project, even while staying home.

Adirondack Community: Capturing, Retaining, and Communicating the Stories of Who We Are, is a multi-year local history project that collects and organizes three to five minute audio stories and related photographs from Town of Keene community members through an online platform to share the rich social and cultural history of this community located in New York State’s Adirondack Mountains.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, May 3, 2020

Top Biathlete to attend Paul Smith’s College

19-year-old Garrett Beckrich from Grand Rapids, Minn., member of USBA’s Junior National Team and Top Biathlete has enrolled in Paul Smith’s College in the Adirondacks. Beckrich is a member of the USBA’s Junior National Team and has been participating in biathlon since 2017. He has competed in three Youth/Junior world championships.

Beckrich intends to pursue a degree in biology, and to keep up with his training at Paul Smith’s in the hopes of traveling overseas to compete in races without too much academic interference.

Tim Burke, four-time Olympian from Paul Smith’s, and Director of Athlete Development for the US Biathlon had this to say about Beckrich’s enrollment in the college:  “Garrett has always been known for his hard work. I look forward to seeing this pay off both on the field of play and in the classroom.”


Sunday, May 3, 2020

Call for entries: 47th Annual Tupper Lake Art Show

The Tupper Art Center  is currently closed for now due to the quarantine and it’s possible they may delay the opening of the following events or opt for a virtual format. Regardless, they are preparing for a number of events to be happening soon over the coming months:.

They are currently calling for artists for their 47th annual Tupper Lake Art Show, to take place at 106 Park St, Tupper Lake, on June 17 – July 11. Artists may submit up to 4 hanging works of art per individual, of any medium. Tables are available for 3 dimensional projects and floor space will be available for larger works of art. The drop-off is Saturday June 13 and Sunday June 14 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The reception is Wednesday, June 17, 6 to 8 p.m., and the pick-up will be  July 12-13. To learn more about the art show and to find forms to enter, just visit this link.

There will also be an Adirondacks Woodcrafts Show from July 14 – July 30, with the opening reception being on July 14 from 5 – 7 p.m. For more information you can contact [email protected]


Sunday, May 3, 2020

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Saturday, May 2, 2020

History of Arab Mountain – Beyond the Fire Tower

Arab Mountain (or, more often, Mount Arab) is a 2,539-foot peak located in the Town of Piercefield in St. Lawrence County, almost five miles west of Tupper Lake and nine miles east of Cranberry Lake.
The hike to the summit is relatively easy and short (a two mile round-trip), and one can climb the steel, 35-foot Aermotor fire tower (built in 1918) and enjoy the beautiful panorama of the Adirondacks from the cab. Just across from the fire tower is the old observer’s cabin which has been restored and turned into a museum. The museum, established by the Friends of Mt Arab (FoMA), contains a wealth of information on the use of Arab Mountain for fire observation. The cabin is open when the summit steward is on duty, from the late spring to early fall. In regard to peak-bagging challenges, it is part of the Fire Tower Challenge and the Tupper Lake Triad. (Editor’s note, fire towers are currently closed due to COVID-19, and the Fire Tower Challenge is temporarily suspended
Much of the history given here is prior to Arab Mountain being established for fire observation in 1911. I delve into the history of its name, appearance on nineteenth-century maps, and use in early surveys. I also briefly discuss a nearby peak that is virtually unheard of and is unmapped: Gull Pond Mountain.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 2, 2020

Lawson and Clint Allen Scholarship Accepting Applicants

The Essex Community Fund at Adirondack Foundation announced the “Lawson and Clint Allen Scholarship and Educational Program Fund” is now accepting applications for graduating high school seniors within Essex and Willsboro. Eligable applications will be enrolled in public, private, or home schools with plans to attend post-secondary education at a 2 or 4 year college, or through trade certification.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 2, 2020

From the Archive: Infamous Murder Revisited

Murder in the Adirondacks bookFrom 2017: Betsy Kepes reviews an updated edition of Craig Brandon’s classic 1986 book “Murder in the Adirondacks.” Over 100 years ago, the Chester Gillette Grace Brown murder case was considered the trial of the century. The case became the basis for Theodore Dreiser’s classic novel “An American Tragedy” and the movie “A Place in the Sun,” starring Montgomery Clift and Elizabeth Taylor. Brandon’s book revisits the tragedy at Big Moose Lake and the ensuing trial.

According to Kepes, when North Country Books asked Brandon if he’d be interested in writing a revised edition, he jumped at the chance.

Read more here: https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2017/04/infamous-murder-in-adirondacks-revisited.html

 

One year ago: Peter Bauer looks at 40 Years of Household Income Trends in Rural America

Five years ago: Dan Crane discovers illegal trails in the Five Ponds, Pepperbox Wilderness Areas:  https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2015/05/illegal-trail-straddles-five-ponds-pepperbox-wilderness.html

 

Stay informed about news and information about the Adirondacks by signing up for the Almanack’s daily news digest: https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/sign-email-updates

 


Saturday, May 2, 2020

May brings more fishing opportunities

Starting today (Saturday, May 2), it’s open season for cool water fish like walleye, northern pike, pickerel, and the tiger muskellunge.

Historically, walleye only inhabited waters in the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence River, and Allegheny River watersheds in New York. Today, primarily due to stocking and other DEC management efforts, walleye occur in more than 140 waters from all of the major watersheds of the state.

Visit the DEC’s website here to find prime fishing locations, and check out the feature article “Prized ‘Eyes,” in DEC’s Freshwater Fishing Digest, where the DEC reveals how they manage walleye,  and where to catch them.

Kristyn Hanna proudly holds a walleye she caught from Oneida Lake in February 2019. DEC photo



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Support the Adirondack Almanack and the Adirondack Explorer all year long with a monthly gift that fits your budget.