Monday, October 7, 2019

10th Annual Garlic Festival Set For Warrensburg

Garlic Festival at the Warrensburgh Riverfront Farmers' MarketTenth Annual Garlic Festival at the Warrensburgh Riverfront Farmers’ Market is set for Friday, October 11th, from 3 to 6 pm.

Certified organic and naturally grown garlic will be sampled and sold for planting and consumption. Horticultural information and recipes will be provided at the CCE of Warren County Master Gardener Station. » Continue Reading.


Monday, October 7, 2019

Folk and Blues Concert in Blue Mountain Lake

Barry Oreck and FriendsThe Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts in Blue Mountain Lake is set to present a folk and blues concert featuring Barry Oreck and Friends on Friday, October 11th at 7:30 pm. » Continue Reading.


Monday, October 7, 2019

LGLC Reports Successful 3rd Annual Race for the Lake

Amys Race start by Amanda MetzgerThe Lake George Land Conservancy (LGLC) hosted its 3rd annual Amy’s Adventure Race for the Lake at Amy’s Park in Bolton on Saturday, September 28th. This year’s race included 52 competitors ranging in ages between 23-72, and another 20 Next Generation (NextGen) Committee members and volunteers who helped organize and run the successful event. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 6, 2019

Time To Reconsider An Old Idea, A High Peaks Permit System

Credit goes to the Department of Environmental Conservation and its Region 5 facilitators for including a “break-out” session on Permits at its late July High Peaks-Route 73 stakeholder meeting at the Keene Central School. After all, the very word “permit” has been an electrified “third rail” (hazardous, indeed) topic for years.

That was not always the case, however.  In 1978, the first draft of a High Peaks Unit Management Plan included a section on “individual user controls” with eight alternatives along a spectrum ranging from mandatory registration and reservation permit systems, to no controls at all. Alternative C, reservation or permit systems, stated that “through past experience the U.S. Forest Service has found that a permit system is one of the best ways of gathering user information concerning an individual management area.”

The 1978 draft UMP went on to recommend that a “free permit system should be initiated in the eastern High Peaks with no effort to limit numbers of people using the area for at least three years. Data will be analyzed. If at some time in the future it is determined that numbers of people using the area will have to be controlled, even just for certain high use weekends, the mechanism will already be in place to do so.” » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 6, 2019

Atlantic Salmon Returning to Boquet River

Atlantic Salmon courtesy NOAA FisheriesThe Whallonsburg Grange Lyceum has announced “Beneath the Surface: Salmon in the Boquet River,” a program on the return of landlocked Atlantic salmon to the Boquet River, set for Tuesday, October 15th, at 7:30 pm. This program is part of the Grange’s fall series “Hidden in Plain Sight.” » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 6, 2019

DEC Accepting Applications for Urban Forestry Projects

DEC logoState Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced up to $1.2 million in grant funding is available for urban forestry projects across New York. Grants are available for tree planting, maintenance, tree inventory, community forest management plans, and for educating those who care for public trees. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 6, 2019

Chainsaw Safety Course Offered For Landowners

Mike Burns instructs a Chainsaw Safety Course provided by CCE Warren CountyCornell Cooperative Extension of Warren County is set to hold a chainsaw safety workshop on Monday, October 21st.

Mike Burns will present an instructional program for the occasional chainsaw user on safe operation and risk mitigation. The workshop will cover the anatomy of a chainsaw, maintenance of a chainsaw, what safety gear to wear, proper cutting of standing and laying trees, and more. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, October 5, 2019

Firewood Physiology and the Woodstove

This week feels like fall proper. It’s gray, drizzly, 50s; the kind of weather that makes you realize you’d better batten down the house for winter.

We’re going to get to the first fire of the year in a moment, that pathetic, smoldering pile of hissing wood in your woodstove that you made such a big deal about. “Come here kids!” for the ceremonial lighting of the hearth, which turned into the ceremonial opening of the doors and windows to let the smoke out of the living room. (Write what you know, the English professors advise.)

But first let’s talk about the physiology of a tree. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, October 5, 2019

Audio, Visual Preservation Workshop Set For Elizabethtown

Audio Visual Preservation WorkshopThe Adirondack History Museum in Elizabethtown has announced a Historians Day Workshop, set for October 16th, from 9:30 am to 2:30 pm.

Prof. Gerald Zahavi, historian and Director of the Documentary Studies Program at the University at Albany, will present a workshop on strategies for film, video and audio media preservation, restoration, and digital conversion and reformatting. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, October 5, 2019

Poetry: 400 Feet Closer to Heaven

400 Feet Closer to Heaven

Maybe 400 feet closer to heaven than we were
When we started climbing we sit beside the outlet
To the sphagnum-bed spring atop Eleventh Mountain
We siblings in age-order to the youngest, me,
Being Matt Esther Karen and then our Mom Alice
The logistician of our many wilderness forays
As even now we pause to sit beside the streamlet
To lunch on gorp and our tunafish sandwiches
And stare out across the valley and then low hills
To the mountains off toward and then in Vermont
But the view can’t compete with the big surprise
Of tomatoes we watch Mom dole out until Karen
Incredulous asks “We each get a whole tomato?”
Only her inflection giving away that it’s a question.
This unheard of event in our 1950s family life
Turns out to be a plump round juicy fact indeed.

Read More Poems From The Adirondack Almanack HERE.


Friday, October 4, 2019

Guide Ticketed For Hunting Without A License, Improper Firearm

2019-2020 Canada Goose Season MapDepartment of Environmental Conservation Environmental Conservation Officer (ECO) Jennifer Okonuk reported that on September 21, she encountered several migratory bird hunters in Northern Franklin County during the early goose and youth waterfowl hunting seasons.

ECO Okonuk said one group of hunters from Maine was guided by a licensed guide outfitter, but three of the hunters failed to have their required New York Harvest Information Program (HIP) number. The licensed guide also failed to possess a valid hunting license, she said. None of the hunters had their guns plugged as required, and the guns were all capable of holding more than three shells according to ECO Okonuk. » Continue Reading.


Friday, October 4, 2019

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, October 4, 2019

BETA Bike and Ski Trail Volunteer Days Scheduled

BETA Bike and Ski Trail Volunteer DayBarkeater Trails Alliance has announced fall volunteer trail days, the first set for Sunday, October 6th, from noon to 4 pm.

During this half day project volunteers will clean up a new trail corridor on the new Cobble Hill Trail System, above the golf course in Elizabethtown. Work will mostly involve pulling stumps and cleaning up the cleared corridor for winter use . » Continue Reading.


Friday, October 4, 2019

Rowland’s Newest Book Confirms: Politics is a Weird Business

politics weird o pediaNew York Times digital bestselling author Tim Rowland’s newest book confirms what many have suspected: politics is a weird business.

Rowland argues in his newest book Politics Weird-O-Pedia: The Ultimate Book of Surprising, Strange, and Incredibly Bizarre Facts about Politics, that today’s political culture is no more unhinged than it has been at any point in world history.

In fact, he says, we may comfort ourselves knowing that at points in the past, politics has been much more bizarre than it is now. “Today, for example, at least we are no longer cementing thousands of live humans into our public works projects. That we know of,” he says. » Continue Reading.


Friday, October 4, 2019

This Week’s Big Adirondack News Stories