Tuesday, February 15, 2022

A renewed interest in wetlands

DeNeale Property wetlands & woods

Conservationists across the state cheered loudly last month when Gov. Kathy Hochul proposed strengthening protections for wetlands.

Under current state rules, wetlands are only protected if they are included on official wetland maps – even if the parcels otherwise meet protection standards – but Hochul proposes scrapping that approach and ensuring wetlands of 12.4 acres or greater are automatically protected.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, February 15, 2022

Robert Rogers and his Rangers return to Fort Ticonderoga

battle on snowshoes rogersRobert Rogers and his Rangers return to Fort Ticonderoga Saturday, February 26, 2022 through the dramatic 1759 Battle on Snowshoes reenactment from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

The Battle on Snowshoes event vividly recreates the final winter battle between a scout of Mohawk warriors, British Regulars, and Rogers’ Rangers, versus the French garrison of soldiers, Canadians and Native American warriors at Fort Ticonderoga on March 7, 1759. This event is designed to be a rich experience for guests of all ages as they explore the final Battle on Snowshoes within the year 1759.

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Tuesday, February 15, 2022

2022 marks Adirondack Foundation’s 25th anniversary

The Adirondack Foundation’s President & CEO, Cali Brooks, shared the following message to the foundation’s supporters, partners and friends as foundation staff celebrate their 25th anniversary this year.
“2022 marks The Adirondack Foundation’s 25th anniversary,” Brooks said. “As we celebrate and reflect on a quarter century of enhancing the lives of people in the Adirondacks through philanthropy, we are thankful for all of you – our supporters, partners, and grantees who have helped to make our work possible. We hope you’ll join us in celebrating this milestone throughout the year. Stay tuned for more and be sure to hold Friday, August 12th for our summer celebration of community at Heaven Hill Farm in Lake Placid. As we look back, we also look ahead to our next 25 years of working toward our vision for a thriving Adirondacks – one where communities are strong, just, and inclusive; family wellbeing is supported through quality healthcare and education; economic vitality is supported through workforce training and entrepreneurship; nature is protected and cared for; and arts and cultural opportunities are available to all. How can we set the stage for this next chapter in our history?
By working alongside our amazing partners to drive equitable prosperity in communities where our neighbors live, work, and raise their families. By constantly adapting to the evolving needs and opportunities of the region we serve. By being nimble and innovative day in and day out to ensure families have the tools and resources they need to overcome income, housing, and other barriers. And by bridging our knowledge, networks, and experience with the generosity of our neighbors to amplify community needs and accelerate change. As your community foundation, we play a unique role across the region. We hope you will join us in setting the stage for the years ahead.”

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Monday, February 14, 2022

Plan for a Better Spring: Selecting the right species of trees for your property

bur oak trees

Looking for a way to enhance property value, save energy costs, boost mental health, and help the planet in one simple, low-cost step? Yeah, me too. Let me know if you think of something. Seriously, though, a few well-placed trees in one’s yard typically add at least 5% to a property’s value. Having large older specimens (of trees, I mean) around the house can push that figure close to 20%. In terms of energy savings, deciduous trees on the southern and western sides of a house tend to slash cooling costs by roughly one-quarter.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, February 14, 2022

Be a ‘Snow Birder’ This Winter

grosbeaks

While the chilliest months of the year may seem like the hardest time to venture outdoors, it can be a great time to go birding. Layer up and head out to your backyard, local park, or other public space and observe some of the bird species that you may not normally see during warmer months. Winter raptors (PDF) including snowy owls (PDF)short-eared owls, barn owls, and hawks migrate south from the Canadian tundra and can be observed near open bodies of water and large grasslands. Some species of woodpeckers may be easier to hear or see in their winter homes. Black-capped chickadees remain in Northern climates due to their ability to survive the ultra-cold weather. Winter is also the best time to observe bald eagles!

Use a website like eBird to see what species have been detected near you. The free Merlin Bird ID app can help you identify unfamiliar birds and add even more new species to your lists.

If you do brave the cold and snow, properly preparing for winter conditions is essential for a more enjoyable and safe experience. Check out our latest YouTube video on layering for winter, and read up on some of our winter hiking safety tips that can be for any outdoor trip.

Stay tuned for future announcements on the New York State Birding Trail to find locations across the state to go birding.

Photo of grosbeaks by Randy Fredlund.


Monday, February 14, 2022

Virtual business matchmaking event on Feb. 15

ward lumber

North Country Businesses for Sale is a free virtual matchmaking event to empower successful business transitions in the region.

The Center for Businesses in Transition (CBIT) is bringing together owners currently offering their North Country business for sale with entrepreneurs and aspiring business owners. From 4-6 pm on Tuesday, Feb. 15.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, February 13, 2022

Adirondack Outlaw romance: A Trail of Broken Hearts

valentines day

An Adirondack Outlaw: Wandering Lost in Love’s Wilderness

There’s a mystic trail in these mountains. Myths, tragedies, and harrowing rescue tales surround it. It’s not marked on any map. Old timers who’ve survived its trek issue stern warnings to those yearning to follow.  Legends say it reaches skyward beyond Marcy’s peak to the clouds.

It’s well known, yet elusive. It begins near heart’s lake. It is rugged, treacherous, and steep. Many outlaw souls have attempted its route.

Most brave harts who sought never found it. Of those who somehow did, most quickly got lost in the woods, others got dizzy and disoriented, many broke down in tears, some found themselves mired waist deep in a swamp, quite a few just plain quit.

Most who survived the journey bore scars for life.

Legends say it’s a trail littered with broken hearts.

More than a few are my own.  » Continue Reading.


Sunday, February 13, 2022

Join the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Winter Mapping Challenge

hwa invasive mappingDid you know that winter is the best time to check for hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA)? We need your help monitoring this invasive species, particularly along the “leading edge” of the distribution that runs across the state.

Now through March 12, NY iMapInvasives and the NYS Hemlock Initiative are hosting NY’s first statewide Winter Mapping Challenge. Join the challenge to help monitor this invasive species and compete to win a prize!

To participate: Get outside, find some hemlock trees, check for white “fuzz balls” on the undersides of twigs, and report your findings to NY iMapInvasives – earning the coveted champion title could be that easy! The top reporter of presence and not-detected records for HWA from February 12 through March 12 will win the challenge.

Visit iMap’s website to learn more about the challenge and connect with HWA mapping efforts in your area.

Photo submitted to iMapInvasives by Observer #22202

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, February 13, 2022

Weekly news round up

A collection of interesting reads:

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Saturday, February 12, 2022

Finding fun after winter storm by snowshoeing, skiing, and analyzing animal tracks

The cold temperatures are back after a short day when they got above freezing just before the massive storm that crossed the country and hit us. Freezing rain and rain were predicted, but all I had here was twelve inches of snow which the snowblower ate for about three hours in order to clear the 950 feet of driveway. I cleared the bird feeders with the scoop first to get them something to eat and they flocked right in as the temperatures were dropping.

My feeding flock of birds hasn’t changed much in the last couple of weeks. I put some bands on a few of them, mostly blue jays caught in the potter trap. The most I’ve counted has been 14 to 16 jays at one time. However, I’ve banded over twenty of them in the last couple of weeks so some new ones may have moved into the feeders. I had a high count of 32 purple finches and 22 slate-colored juncos. I believe all the juncos are wearing bands, but only about ten of the purple finches have bands.

I know the birds went through forty pounds of sunflower seeds in less than two weeks. While much of that has been stored by the jays and the chickadees, the finches and juncos eat every seed they are able to get a hold of. The pair of tufted titmice have been regulars but only one of them is banded. Only a couple of American goldfinches have been hanging around and one common redpoll has been battling for places on the platform with the finches and jays. The sharp-shinned hawk came through early this morning and nailed another junco for a snack. In answer to someone who commented on my last column asking if I caught the hawk and banded it. I didn’t catch it, as I would have had to have the net up in order to catch this bird as it flies through.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 12, 2022

MAKE IT: Cajun cauliflower

cajun cauliflower

Here is a recipe for cajun cauliflower, from Eastern Michigan University dietetic intern, Kristina (it is really good – my son, who detests cauliflower, actually not only tried it but liked it).

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 12, 2022

Adirondack Kids for February


Friday, February 11, 2022

Getting Rid of the Box

collie and richard, thinking outside the box

An Adirondack Outlaw Survivor Approach To Living Life Forward

We’ve all heard the phrase “Think outside the box.”  It’s all too frequently offered as a euphemism for innovative thinking or creative problem solving.  It’s even been used by many “experts” as a foundation philosophy for a long list of bestselling books.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, February 11, 2022

Paul Smiths students develop survey to assess Hurricane Irene

irene flooding bridge out

Residents of Essex and Clinton counties who were impacted by the storm are asked to take short survey

The Paul Smith’s College Senior Capstone for Integrated Disaster Management Studies is in full swing. This spring’s students are developing a research project that focuses on Community Resilience to Natural Disasters and how that resilience is linked to ecosystem restoration and adaptability.

We designed a survey to begin to address the following steps which are often found in community based vulnerability assessments:

Step 1: Identify and Rank Hazards
Step 2: Map Areas of Greatest Risk
Step 3: Identify and Map Physically Vulnerable People and Property
Step 4: Identify and Map Socially Vulnerable Populations
Step 5: Inventory and Map Environmental Hazards

The survey is based on Community Vulnerability metrics from the FEMA RAP Toolkit.  Much of the identification of social vulnerabilities will come directly from the responses in your surveys. We will consider this empirical data and establish our own vulnerability assessment. If you’re interested in helping us, and live in Essex or Clinton Counties, the survey link is found here.

Irene’s flooding of Styles Bridge in Keene, photo by Lorraine Duvall


Friday, February 11, 2022

Outdoor conditions (2/11): Snowshoes and skis required in High Peaks

outdoor conditions logoThe following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

High Peaks Wilderness:

  • Snowshoes or skis are now required to be worn as snow depths exceed 8 inches.
  • Snow report as of 02/10: Trails to Marcy are skiable, with some areas requiring crampons and microspikes. The Van Ho trail is skiable with some icy sections. Both Avalanche Lake and Lake Colden are frozen. There is 3.5ft of snow at the Lake Colden Outpost and 4-5ft of snow at higher elevations. Note: Conditions may have changed since last report. Expect additional snow.

» Continue Reading.



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