Friday, May 26, 2023

Outdoor Conditions (5/26): Hikers encouraged to arrive at trailheads early, prepare for crowded trails this weekend

outdoor conditions logoThe following are only the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry webpages for a full list of notices, including seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

NEW THIS WEEK

High Peaks Wilderness

  • Per the conservation easement agreement with Elk Lake Lodge, the Gate at Clear Pond is now open to Public Motor Vehicles and will remain open until the start of Big Game season (in October). Parking at the Elk Lake Parking Lot Trailhead is limited and NO PARKING is allowed along the roadway. When the trailhead parking fills up, hikers will need to park at the Upper Elk Lake Road Parking Lot on the west side of the Elk Lake Road approximately 2.3 miles south of the Elk Lake Parking Lot Trailhead. While driving on Elk Lake Road, please respect posted lower speed limits. Please help ensure the Conservation Easement is respected and all users have a safe and enjoyable experience.

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Friday, May 26, 2023

Latest news headlines

Here’s a look at news from around the Adirondacks this week:

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Thursday, May 25, 2023

Who will pay for dam repairs?

The “Rainy-Dam Dam Failure” inundation map for Loon Lake Dam, showing the expected flood zone created if the dam failed during a massive storm.

We continued to run stories from our dam series this weekend. Join us as we shine a light on municipal dam owners. And dig into ways to improve dam safety drawn from the experiences of other states.

A handful of the Adirondack Park’s riskiest dams are owned by towns. Some of those towns have been slow to meet state requirements and  to pull together the financing needed to make (often costly) upgrades.

Town leaders say they need more financial support from the state to get the job done. The state says its the responsibility of all dam owners, including municipalities, to keep up with repair needs.

The other story outlines strategies that could be employed to improve a state dam safety program. Those strategies include raising funds through dam owner fees and strengthening risk analysis approaches.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 25, 2023

Great Camp Sagamore’s Community Day set for June 11

Great Camp Sagamore

Raquette Lake, NY – Great Camp Sagamore is hosting Community Day on Sunday, June 11, 2023. Guests are welcome to gather for free self-guided walking tours throughout the day from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and also for brunch in the camp’s historic Dining Hall from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. for a fee. Donations are encouraged. The Dining Hall will be available to visitors for brunch from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on a rolling basis and will be served buffet style by Sagamore’s culinary team led by Chef Annie Prizzi.

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Thursday, May 25, 2023

American Legion Post 1392 of Indian Lake offers to retire worn, unusable American flags

American flag

The American Legion Post 1392 of Indian Lake, NY is seeking the public’s participation in respectfully disposing of worn, torn, and unusable American flags.  American Legion Post 1392, Commander Ken Cannan said it has recently come to their attention that American flags were sent to transfer/dump stations in order to dispose of them.

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Wednesday, May 24, 2023

Highlights from the APA’s May meeting

Members and staff of the Adirondack Park Agency sit around a table listening to a presentation during the March 16 meeting in Ray Brook. Photo by Gwendolyn Craig

Last week’s Adirondack Park Agency meeting generated several news stories. The highlights include:

    • The board passed a resolution allowing for herbicide use on Lake Luzerne to combat invasive Eurasian watermilfoil. This is the same herbicide that the Lake George Association and others did not want applied in Lake George without more research.
    • The board adopted a policy capping an increase of roads in wild forest areas at 11.6%. This gives the state Department of Environmental Conservation and APA about 13 miles of roads available for the future. While this interpretation wraps up a 50-year-old question, the APA gave itself an exit plan allowing for a “contrary interpretation.” Some speculate lawsuits could come of the interpretation, too.
    • The APA also backed down on its proposals to limit public comment and shorten its review time for policies.
    • And state Sen. Dan Stec made a surprise appearance at the end of the APA’s meeting and complained about cell tower regulations.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 24, 2023

Discussion time: Wilderness dams

The Explorer has been running a series on the 500+ dams that can be found within the Adirondack Park boundary. (Click here to see all the stories in the series) One of the articles specifically looks at dams that are in Wilderness areas. Marcy Dam is now gone and same with the dam that once made Duck Hole a celebrated paddling destination. Lake Colden is the only remaining dam.

The question remains: Do dams have a place in these protected areas? Should the state maintain the ones that remain? The article points to Lows Lake and the Boreas Ponds tract as examples of dams the state is willing to maintain. Weigh in here with your thoughts.

Photo at top: Debris from the old wilderness dam at Duck Hole. Photo by Mike Lynch


Wednesday, May 24, 2023

Snow/rain complicate 16-hour Phelps Trail rescue, hikers treated for mild hypothermia

forest ranger reportTown of Black Brook
Clinton County
Wildland Fire:
 On May 15 at 6:45 p.m., Ray Brook Dispatch requested Forest Ranger assistance with a wildland fire in Black Brook near the intersection of Turnpike and Goodrich Mills roads. Ausable Forks and Saranac Lake fire departments also responded to the 30-acre fire. Rangers and other firefighters sustained fire suppression efforts for several days. On May 17 at 6:45 p.m., the fire was declared 100 percent contained. The fire remains in patrol status.

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Tuesday, May 23, 2023

It’s Time To Ban Wildlife Killing Contests In New York

This year, Protect the Adirondacks is working with a number of other groups to support legislation banning wildlife killing contests. Legislation introduced by State Assembly Environmental Conservation Chair Deborah Glick and State Senator Timothy Kennedy, makes it “unlawful for any person to organize, sponsor, conduct, promote, or participate in any contest, competition, tournament or derby where the objective of such contest or competition is to take wildlife.” This legislation protects coyotes, small mammals, and fur bearers.

This bill amends the Environmental Conservation Law to make it unlawful for any person to organize, sponsor, conduct, promote or participate in any contest, competition, tournament, or derby with the objective of taking or hunting wildlife for prizes or other inducement, or for entertainment. Contests for taking or hunting white-tailed deer, turkey or bear are exempted, which are already regulated by seasons, bag limits, and reporting requirements. Special dog training areas or field trials or similar canine performance events are also exempted. Violations are punishable by fines of $500 to $2,000. In addition, the remains of any wildlife killed in violation of the bill’s provisions are forfeited to the Department of Environmental Conservation.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 23, 2023

Give Turtles a Brake in recognition of World Turtle Day

Wood Turtle

In recognition of World Turtle Day® on Tuesday, May 23, 2023, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos reminded New Yorkers that turtles are nesting in May and June, and asked motorists to “give turtles a brake.” In New York, thousands of turtles are killed each year by unsuspecting drivers when turtles cross roads to find nesting areas.

“While a turtle’s shell provides protection from predators, it does not protect against being struck by vehicles while crossing roadways,” Commissioner Seggos said. “Vehicle strikes are a major cause of mortality among turtles and New York’s native turtles are more susceptible at this time of year as they seek sandy areas or loose soil in which to lay their eggs. Especially in these coming weeks, DEC urges drivers to be on the lookout for turtles and slow down, particularly on roads near rivers and marshy areas.”

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, May 23, 2023

Spring visitor

bear
The dinner guest arrived late.
No invitation.
No reservations.
Alone.

Just newly awake,
belly growling with
a devastating hunger.

Drawn here
for a free meal,
easy,
high in calories.
A good deal.

He almost got away with it
but for a soft noise.

3 a.m. is the witching hour.
I look out.
Is he even real?
or a supernatural specter?

To Native Americans
he is a spiritual guide.
To Robert Frost
a being that roams wide:
“The world has room to make a bear feel free;
The universe seems cramped to you and me.”

Ursa Major dominates the spring skies.
The Big Dipper, a guide.
Under the stars, my bruin friend,
I whisper “safely abide.”

I will listen to the DEC officers
and take the bird feeders
down until fall.
When you next again
“rock a boulder on the wall”.

 

Black bear in Raquette Lake. Photo by Jeff Nadler, archive photo.


Tuesday, May 23, 2023

Stewards return to popular high peaks summits

Liam Ebner, ADK Summit Steward Coordinator

Lake Placid, NY — The Adirondack High Peaks Summit Stewardship Program has started its 34th season of protecting New York’s alpine ecosystem. Summit stewards will be educating hikers on high peaks summits—namely Marcy, Algonquin, Wright, and Cascade—through Indigenous People’s Day.  

“We are excited to continue the important work of protecting New York’s alpine ecosystem,” said Liam Ebner, ADK Summit Steward Coordinator. “The Summit Stewardship Program has been and continues to be one of the best examples we have of an outreach effort that has successfully shown people how to protect sensitive ecosystems while they enjoy them.”

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Monday, May 22, 2023

The return of Dick Monroe: The River Calling

Editor’s note: We are so pleased to be able to feature Dick Monroe’s writing on the Adirondack Almanack. He previously shared some of his wonderful, insightful essays, poems and stories of his “Adirondack Outlaw” adventures coming of age in Saranac Lake, as well as his outdoor adventures and personal experiences. Read his previous Almanack submissions here and welcome back, Dick! We look forward to you sharing excerpts and snippets of your work with us.

saranac river with bridge

“The River Calling”

My ode to the Saranac River. My lifelong comfort, companion & friend. Its waters flow through my veins. Whether I’m hunting, fishing, exploring, swimming, canoeing or camping, wherever life’s next Adirondack Outlaw adventure takes me, I can hear it calling. Click here below to read the full poem.

 


Monday, May 22, 2023

Adirondack Life & Adirondack Land Trust to present My Adirondacks kids’ photography project

Child taking a photograph in nature.

Jay, NY – Adirondack Life and Adirondack Land Trust announce My Adirondacks, a project that invites kids, ages 5 to 17, to photograph an aspect of the natural world within the Adirondack Park and share why it matters to them. Submissions can be sent to aledit@adirondacklife.com and will be accepted now through August 19, 2023.

The following information is required:

·       Name and age.

·       Where in the Adirondack Park the photo was taken.

·       Up to a few sentences about why the image matters to the person who took it.

» Continue Reading.



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