Friday, July 7, 2017

A Call For Citizen Scientists To Remove Asian Clams In Sandy Bay

Citizen Scientists participating in the Lake George Association's first Asian Clam Citizen Science Day.Last year, 475 Asian clams — a small clam, less than 1.5 inches in size, that can spread rapidly — were removed from Lake George, thanks to a half day of work from about 20 volunteers as part of the Lake George Association’s Asian Clam Citizen Science Day in Sandy Bay.

The association hopes for a similar result this year from 10 am to 1 pm Monday July 10 when it holds its second Asian Clam Citizen Science Day as part of New York’s Invasive Species Awareness Week July 9 through 15. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 7, 2017

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, July 7, 2017

Invasive Species Awareness Week July 9-15

So far this summer has been rain with just enough sun to grow everything I’ve planted and sprout other seeds I never knew existed. Since I like the weeds and wildflowers (Joe-pye weed, milkweed, bunchberry, and wild wintergreen), I just leave the unidentified plants alone.  I save wildflowers from the center of our yard by transplanting them into flowerbeds or alongside our house, fences, and roadside.

Since not all non-native plants are invasive, it’s important to find out what plants are causing harm to the environment and make sure I’m not contributing to the problem. I don’t want to bring anything into the yard that is considered an Adirondack invasive, I’ve always taken advantage of the Cornell University Cooperative Extension team of master gardeners to answer questions, look at samples, and provide a bevy of useful information. I want my garden to be a safe haven for any pollinators. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 7, 2017

Common Ground Alliance Meeting Planned In Old Forge

Adirondack Common Ground Alliance Forum group photo 2016The annual Common Ground Alliance Forum will be held on Tuesday, July 11, from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm, at View in Old Forge. Topics for this year’s event range from attracting young people to the region to combating invasive species, and were selected based on survey responses from nearly 300 community leaders, business owners, government officials and Adirondack residents.

Community stakeholders from all over the Adirondacks are expected to come together to coordinate their efforts for collective action. » Continue Reading.


Friday, July 7, 2017

The Big Adirondack News Stories This Week


Thursday, July 6, 2017

Unintended Consequences: North Country Starlings

starlingIt’s the classic story of unintended consequences.

In 1890, Eugene Schieffelin released 60 starlings in New York’s Central Park with the hope of establishing a breeding population. Just in case the experiment wasn’t successful, he released another 40 the next year.

Schieffelin was a big Shakespeare fan and he wanted to bring to the New World all the European birds mentioned in The Bard’s plays. Starlings appear in Henry IV, Part 1, in case you are wondering. Schieffelin was also a member of the American Acclimatization Society, a group that advocated shifting species around the globe. It apparently seemed like a good idea at the time and had the support of a lot of scientists. Now we know it’s not. But it’s too late. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 6, 2017

Adirondack Outdoor Conditions Report (July 6)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Send observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND
» Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 6, 2017

Friends Of Poke-O-Moonshine Silent Art Auction

Poke-O-Moonshine Fire Tower As part of the Poke-O-Moonshine Fire Tower Centennial (1917-2017), this summer, The Friends of Poke-O-Moonshine, Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH), and Ausable Brewing Company will be hosting an Exhibit and Silent Auction of artwork related to the mountain, its human and natural history, and its fire tower. This is in place of the exhibit that was to be held at the 1719 Block Gallery in Keeseville.

The auction will be held from 7 to 9 pm on July 28 at the AARCH offices at 1745 Main Street, Keeseville, and on July 30 during the Poke-O-Moonshine Fire Tower Centennial Celebration at Ausable Brewing Company, 765 Mace Chasm Road, Keeseville, from 4:30 to 8 pm. 2D works of Poke-O-Moonshine-themed art, including works on paper or canvas and photography, are eligible for entry. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 6, 2017

Wild Center Hosting Monday Morning ‘Art in the Park’ Series

Monday mornings, from July 10th until August 28th, the Wild Center will explore the natural world through art with experienced Adirondack artists.

According to an announcement of the series sent to the press, “each three-hour class is a good way to expand art skills, have fun and learn new art techniques in areas such as watercolor, pastels and mixed media.”

Every Monday is expected to have a different art focus and offer new skills to enhance artistic knowledge. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, July 6, 2017

Pendragon Theatre’s “Fiction” at View in Old Forge July 10th

Linda and Michael Waterman, played by Leslie Dame and John NicholsonThe dramatic play, Fiction, written by Steven Dietz and directed by Allison Studdiford, will be at View, the art center in Old Forge, on Monday, July 10 at 7:30 pm. Fiction unravels a mysterious literary love triangle spanning both decades and continents. It examines the various fictions we devise to make our lives livable, and what happens when a crisis forces us to abandon these constructs.

The play’s main characters, Linda and Michael Waterman, played by Leslie Dame and John Nicholson, are both successful fiction writers, happily married to one another. They thrive on the give and take nature of their unusually honest and candid relationship. However, when an unexpected tragedy shakes their lives and Linda asks her husband to share his private diaries with her, the boundaries between past and present, fact and fiction, and trust and betrayal begin to break down. The play also co-stars Tara Palen as Abby Drake. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Adirondack Butterflies: The White Admiral

Forest clearings in the Adirondacks are especially attractive settings for many forms of wildlife. The warmth of the ground when the sun is shining is particularly inviting to cold-blooded creatures, and the stands of trees that surround these openings in the canopy serve as a source of food and shelter.

Clearings created during logging operations, wide sections along secondary roads, and the open space that typically exists around lean-tos and campsites are places frequented by numerous animals. Among the creatures easily observed during the coming month in these sunny oases of our deciduous and mixed woodlands is a strikingly attractive, black butterfly with a distinct white strip across its wings. The white admiral butterfly (Limenitis arthemis) is a common component of our fauna and regularly lingers around small forest clearings during the early summer throughout the Park. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Cranberry Lake Dam Marks 150 Years

cranberry lake dam Sesquicentennial patch2017 marks the passage of 150 years since a dam was erected at the outlet of Cranberry Lake on the Oswegatchie River. Originally a much smaller lake, the dam was built to help control the flow of water for downstream communities and their mills.

The groundwork for this was laid in 1865 when the state legislature passed an Act declaring the Oswegatchie River a “public highway.” This lead to the formation of a Board of Commissioners and the construction of the dam, which took place late in 1866. The gates were not closed and the water impounded until the spring of 1867.

According to local historians, the land was not cleared, and as the waters rose through through the trees that first spring, buds opened under water, and trees leafed out with just their tops showing, as the dam raised the lake level by over 11 feet. For decades, dead, dying and decaying trees stood in the water, making the scene somewhat grotesque. State Surveyor Verplanck Colvin wrote in 1873 of the difficulties in getting out onto the water to take measurements and elevations, due to the dead trees standing in the lake. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Invasive Species Awareness Week Events Announced for the Adirondacks

invasive species awareness weekNew York State’s fourth annual Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) will take place July 9th-15th. The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) is collaborating with various partner organizations to offer more than 15 invasive species related events, including  Backcountry Water Monitors Training, Terrestrial Invasive Plant ID & Survey Training, Lake Champlain Water Chestnut Paddle & Pull, and Adirondack Invaders Day at The Wild Center. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Wild Center Adds 34 Acres from the Adirondack Club and Resort

The Adirondack Club and Resort (ACR) planned for Tupper Lake donated 34 acres of land to the Wild Center in celebration of the Hull family, it was announced Monday. The land includes the oxbow on the Raquette River where the natural history museum holds canoe and stand-up paddleboard trips in the summer. The gift expands the Wild Center campus to 115 acres.

“The Hull Family loved the Adirondacks, and more than anything wanted to encourage people from across New York and the country to come and see this incredible natural beauty. That’s the same thing the Wild Center has tried to capture, which is why we are honored to make this donation today,” ACR developer Tom Lawson said in a press release.

The Hull family were leaders of the Oval Wood Dish Corporation, which moved to Tupper Lake in 1915. William Cary Hull donated the land and helped found the Tupper Lake Country Club. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Neil Litchfield, Lewis County’s Master Comedian (conclusion)

After prospering for eight months in England, the Litchfields returned to Newark, New Jersey, at the end of March 1905 for a brief respite before embarking on another season, one that was fully booked into 1906 at scores of stops from New York City to Colorado. Neil’s daughter, Abbie, was now 16 and had begun taking part in the act, which was modified with roles to utilize her talents. After several positive reviews, they began appearing in November as the Neil Litchfield Trio. Her first critical assessment under the new name said simply, “Miss Abbie Litchfield, as accompanist, could not be improved upon.”

A month later, their touring days nearly ended in Vermont, where they were directed at the last minute to take a different train for a better route to their next performance. The one they were initially scheduled to board crashed near Vergennes, killing three passengers, seriously injuring 14 more, and leaving a dozen others hurt.

By January 1907, the Litchfields had performed Down at Brook Farm more than 3,000 times in England, Canada, and the United States. Now working as a trio, they remained as busy as ever. Early in the year they toured northern New York, covering several towns along the St. Lawrence River. Heading southeast, they performed at Whitehall in Washington County before moving on to Vermont and the New England States. Later in the year, there were stops in the central and southern states, with 20 weeks booked in Maryland, Virginia, and the Carolinas prior to a dozen more stops back in northern New York. » Continue Reading.


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