Saturday, May 1, 2021

Northern New York: Don’t Trash It 

picking up litterNorthern New York is often recognized as a great place to live, work, and raise a family. We’re fortunate enough to call the Adirondack Park, Lake Champlain, the St. Lawrence Seaway, and the farms and forests of the northern tier home. World-class downhill and cross-country skiing, golf courses, camping, boating, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, fishing, hunting, and rock climbing; trails for hiking, jogging, bicycling, and horseback riding; tennis courts, and opportunities for outdoor and wildlife photography all contribute to the extremely appealing quality of life that many of us have come to take for granted.

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Saturday, May 1, 2021

MAKE IT: Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars

chocolate chip cookie barChocolate Chip Cookie Bars

Although I am not a huge fan of baking cookies, I do enjoy making these chocolate chip cookie bars for my family! This recipe comes together quickly, and produces delicious cookie bars from scratch (so much better than pre-made cookie mixes!). For variety, substitute butterscotch, mint chocolate, or dark chocolate chunks for the chocolate chips. You can also leave out the chocolate entirely and substitute dried fruit for the chocolate chips (dried cranberries and coconut are a favorite!). » Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 1, 2021

Grow, Eat, Compost, Repeat! Compost Awareness Week

composting graphicInternational Compost Awareness Week is May 2-8

AdkAction’s Compost for Good project is joining environmental and recycling businesses, organizations, community groups and individuals around the globe in celebrating International Compost Awareness Week (ICAW) during the first week of May. The theme of this year’s Compost Awareness Week is “Grow, Eat… COMPOST… Repeat.”

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Friday, April 30, 2021

How to Evaluate High Peaks Report Success in Short- and Long-term

This article concludes the series examining the ideas in the final report of the High Peaks Strategic Planning Group (HPAG) that provides ideas for building a new and improved management program for the High Peaks Wilderness Complex (HPWC). This article focuses on the realities of turning the ideas in the HPAG report, many of which have been around for years or are already in the works, into on-the-ground realities in the management of the HPWC. This piece looks at how to evaluate the success of the ideas enumerated in this report through adoption and implementation of leading ideas in the short-term and long-term.

The report was greeted warmly by the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). The DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos said in a statement “I commend the efforts of the High Peaks Strategic Planning Advisory Group in developing this important report which provides solid recommendations to further enhance our ongoing efforts to manage use and protect our irreplaceable natural treasures.… With the growing uptick in visitors to the High Peaks region, compounded this past summer by New Yorkers desperate to get outside as a respite from the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s critical that DEC and our partners work together to protect these irreplaceable lands for future generations by promoting sustainable recreation, supporting local communities, and improving the visitor experience, and we look forward to working with all partners to continue and expand our ongoing efforts.”

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Friday, April 30, 2021

Coolwater fishing starts May 1

kid fishingMark Your Calendars for May 1st

May 1st marks the opening day for New York’s coolwater species – walleye, northern pike, chain pickerel and tiger muskellunge. (Just a reminder, muskellunge season opens the last Saturday in May.) For additional fishing regulations consult the 2021 Freshwater Fishing Regulations Guide (PDF).

Visit the following links for helpful advice on where to fish for these species:

Walleye Fishing Opportunities
Musky, Pike, Tiger Musky and Pickerel Fishing Opportunities

 


Friday, April 30, 2021

Outdoor Conditions (4/30): Variable weather

outdoor conditions logoThe following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

Tooley Pond Conservation Easement: Gates on Spruce Mountain Road and Allen Pond Road are now open for the season.

Perkins Clearing and Speculator: Perkins Clearing Road will be open to the public starting next Friday, May 7. Jessup River Road is not open and the gate on Old Military Road will remain closed, therefore the access to Pillsbury Mountain Trailhead and West Canada Wilderness is also unavailable.

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Friday, April 30, 2021

Latest news headlines

Here’s a look at news from around the Adirondacks this week:

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Thursday, April 29, 2021

History Matters: Claiming Home


These days it seems like everyone wants to call the Adirondacks home. During the pandemic, closed-in city spaces have lost their allure. It’s a repeat of Saranac Lake’s tuberculosis years, when tens of thousands of people came here from around the world in search of the fresh air cure. When you want to avoid germs, a place with more trees than people is a good bet.
Mohawks picking berries in the Adirondacks. Illustration by John Fadden.

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Thursday, April 29, 2021

I Love My Park Day at Crown Point Historic Area

Crown point state historic site

Celebrate I Love My Park Day on Sunday, May 2 with DEC and State Parks staff at Crown Point Historic Area. Learn how you can better care for and enjoy your parks and public lands. Programming will run from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. To register, email [email protected].

Schedule of Events:

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Thursday, April 29, 2021

A lawsuit, a lake and a marina

marinaLast week, I looked at some broader issues raised by a lawsuit over a marina expansion on Lower Saranac Lake.

The dispute is often cast as one among a neighbor — Thomas Jorling, the former head of the state’s environmental conservation agency — and the marina owner and the agencies allowing the marina expansion. But the lawsuit touches on issues that have bedeviled the region for decades, including the amount of study that needs to be done before development can be allowed in the Adirondack Park.

You can read the full story here.

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Wednesday, April 28, 2021

When the rescuers become the rescued

eagle pastelBy Wendy Hall

The Adirondack Wildlife Refuge LLC has always worked tirelessly to help preserve wildlife through direct public outreach. A mission right from our hearts we share with all of you and with hard work and perseverance we will continue to perform well into the future. We do however have some hills to climb to ensure that we can continue to provide you with a wholesome and safe place to bring your entire family and admire the incredible “ambassador” animals that we share the planet with. We do this in the form of non-releasable species who are given a lifesaving forever home and happy stimulating environment while we share their story with all of you.

We are currently raising funds to build a “required” 1,500-foot parameter fence to ensure regulatory compliance, by June 1 (a matter of weeks from now). This mandated and difficult project is over $100k to complete. It’s a tough hill for us to climb but with all of your support, I know we can and must achieve this to keep our bears and wolves and many other animals home!

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Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Ankle injury on Buck Mountain

forest ranger reportsRecent NYS DEC Forest Ranger actions:

Town of Fort Ann
Washington County
Wilderness Rescue:
 On April 24 at 12:15 p.m., DEC’s Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from Warren County 911 reporting a 51-year-old woman from Malta with an ankle injury was approximately one mile up the Buck Mountain Trail. Forest Ranger Baker responded along with Pilot Knob Fire and EMS. Once on scene, Ranger Baker assisted with the carryout of the hiker to the trailhead where she was transferred to EMS and transported to a local hospital for medical treatment.


Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Lake Placid Cleanup Day coming up May 1

Lake PlacidSpring has sprung and it’s not just crocuses that are springing up from under the snow! The amount of trash that has surfaced seems worse than ever this year as masks litter every street.
It’s time for us to come together again to make our town the shining example it is, a community that works together for the common good.
Please consider volunteering on Saturday May 1st. (rain date 5/8) We should always clean up our own neighborhood, but if you are a business owner or have a group willing to work to clean up a particular area let us know at [email protected] or on our Facebook page Lake Placid Annual Clean Up Day.
We will be holding this event virtually and socially distanced with people sharing their haul on social media. Registration and bag pick up is at 9 am at the Lake Placid Beach house on Parkside Drive in Lake Placid. We will have “special” garbage bags, instructions, latex gloves and community service forms for students. Please follow all social distancing and mask wearing protocols.
Please let us know if you plan to participate. To make the day more fun there will be a treasure hunt for golden eggs and prizes for the most discarded masks collected!

Almanack file photo


Tuesday, April 27, 2021

Microgrants boost farms’ sustainability efforts

North Country CreameryIn celebration of Earth Day 2021, the Adirondack Park’s largest environmental organization awarded 21 micro-grants totaling $29,601 to local farmers and value-added food producers, in an effort to build a climate-friendly local economy in the Adirondack Park.

It was the sixth consecutive year that the Adirondack Council has awarded micro-grants to farmers and small business owners who want to reduce their environmental impact and adapt to a changing climate.

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Tuesday, April 27, 2021

Alone in the woods: A place of hermits and hermit thrushes

Noah RondeauThere’s an abundance of serendipity in these parts, and in our work.

Often, related themes and stories emerge like magic, to make it appear to readers that we had planned them to run side-by-side in our magazine. Sometimes we do that, but others, like in our upcoming May/June issue, the stars just align. And one of the stars of this issue is an old-time hermit named Noah John Rondeau. (The photo of him here is courtesy of the Adirondack Experience museum in Blue Mountain Lake.)

He lived in the same Adirondack woods where hermit thrushes are now returning for spring, and where hikers and backpackers will soon flock to seek refuge from another pandemic summer. If you’ve been following our online series about the struggle to form the Adirondack Park Agency 50 years ago, you’ve had a preview of the history story in which he’ll make an appearance in print. The writer, author Brad Edmondson, presents him as a sort of bridge from the old and truly wild North Country — squatting on public lands in a time when no one really cared — to the modern, regulated park. He died just as the Northway’s fresh pavement was about to deliver a surge of new visitors.

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