Sunday, May 12, 2019

What Shall We Call This?

tree along the trail to the top of Goodnow Mountain has been called the Octopus TreeAnyone who’s spent time in the woods has seen them, a tree growing on top of a large stone or boulder, with its roots winding down around the stone to find nourishment, finally, in the surrounding earth.

The tree could be a yellow birch or a spruce and we see them in many stages of their lives from seedlings growing out of a bed of moss and ferns to very mature trees.

They are one of the great curiosities of the woods, often causing one to stop and examine, marveling at the tenacity and beauty of life. Surely this peculiar plant and stone association must have a name? » Continue Reading.


Sunday, May 12, 2019

Children’s Music Festival at Whallonsburg Grange

music with a messageAn all-day festival of music and art for young people has been set for Saturday, May 18th at the Whallonsburg Grange Hall in Essex.

The “Music with a Message Children’s Music Festival” focuses on the songs of the late folksinger Pete Seeger, whose 100th birthday is being celebrated around the world in May. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, May 12, 2019

Elizabethtown Civil War POW Benjamin Hall Talk in Ti

depiction of Andersonville Prison by John L Ransom

In 1861 Benjamin Hall of Elizabethtown in Essex County was one among many young men who enlisted to fight against the South in the Union Army.

His wartime experiences took him to some of the major battlefields of the American Civil War, and finally to the notorious Confederate prisoner of war camp at Andersonville, Georgia. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 11, 2019

Vulcalock: Inventor William Geer’s Industrial Game-Changer

In the northeast corner of New York, just a few miles from where I grew up, is the village of Rouses Point. Lying directly south of Montreal, it has long provided access for rail shipments to U.S. markets. Where the main highway heading west exits the village is an underpass beneath the rails, so road traffic is not impeded by trains, but it’s a different story within the village, where the tracks cross three streets. I loved it as a young boy when my dad got stuck at one of those crossings, which forced us to sit and watch as sometimes more than a hundred rail cars crawled by — boring for adults, but for a young boy, it was a rare chance to see all sorts of rail cars up close.

Among them were many tanker cars, which — I didn’t know it at the time — resulted from an invention by a little-known North Country man whose work had repercussions around the world. His name was William C. Geer, who, as recently was shared here on Adirondack Almanack, created a golf ball that endured for decades as a professional standard, and a gas mask that helped protect millions of Americans who fought during World War I. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 11, 2019

Horse Camp Is A Spring Tradition

4H horse campOn the weekend of May 17-19, the Franklin County Fairgrounds will be bustling with trailers arriving with horses of all colors, sizes, abilities and disciplines.

4H members and their families from the Franklin, Clinton, and Essex County 4H Horse Programs will be participating in a 37- year spring tradition known as Horse Camp. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 11, 2019

Ed Zahniser: Part of Your Barn Is on Me

Howard Zahniser Cabin Bakers Mills Johnsburg NY photo by John WarrenBig John Dalaba spoke of his land as himself. A few years before he died in 1951, he and my father Howard Zahniser stood looking out at the view of Crane Mountain from our cabin that his daughter Pansy and husband Harold Allen built on the part of the family farm Big John and his wife Hester had deeded to them as a wedding gift in 1938.

A corner of the cowshed built onto Pansy and Harold’s barn still sat on the Dalaba farm, not on the gifted part, which my father and mother Howard and Alice Zahniser had bought in 1946. Harold and Pansy then sought to move downhill to a larger, flatter farm with far better road access for the long, cold, snowy winters. » Continue Reading.


Friday, May 10, 2019

Celebrate Mother’s Day On A Cuisine Or Beverage Trail

adk cuisine trailsI’m not sure what other mothers want to do for Mother’s Day, but I just really want a hot cup of coffee in the morning and relax with a nice local meal and beverage later on in the afternoon.

My family usually goes for a fun hike, but depending on where we go, spring thaw conditions may still be present. We can wait for the right conditions. We are also fortunate to have my 90-year-old mother with us so a rigorous hike is not part of this year’s program.

With a nice old-fashioned Sunday drive, we can still visit part of the Adirondack landscape and pick a new place to visit from the latest cuisine, wine, or craft beverage trail. » Continue Reading.


Friday, May 10, 2019

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, May 10, 2019

Joseph Keegan Appointed NCCC President

NCCC logoThe State University of New York Board of Trustees has approved the appointment of Joseph Keegan as the new President of North Country Community College.

Keegan is currently North Country’s Vice President for Academic Affairs. His appointment as President is effective June 16, 2019. Keegan will be the college’s seventh president since its founding in 1967. He replaces Dr. Steve Tyrell, who led the college since 2012. » Continue Reading.


Friday, May 10, 2019

This Week’s Big Adirondack News Stories


Thursday, May 9, 2019

Man Barred From Owning Guns Ticketed for Poaching Turkeys

Facebook post showing the turkeys shot in a single dayDepartment of Environmental Conservation Environmental Conservation Officer Maxwell Nicols reported that on the evening of April 25, he received a tip about a Facebook post showing multiple turkeys killed prior to the season opener with a subject claiming to have harvested the birds during the youth hunt weekend. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 9, 2019

Mud Season: Current Adirondack Outdoor Conditions (May 9)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon and fully updated by Friday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

Learn and practice the seven Leave No Trace principles. Carry out what you have carried in. Do not leave gear, food, or other items at lean-tos and campsites. Do not litter. Take the free online Leave No Trace course here.

BE PREPARED! Start slow, gain experience. Carry proper safety equipment and weather protection and bring plenty of water, lights and a map. When on the trail: keep the group together, watch the time, and be prepared to turn back. Accidents happen to the most experienced people. Be prepared to spend an unplanned night in the woods in freezing temperatures. Always carry food, a space blanket, emergency whistle, first aid kit, fire making tools, extra clothing layers and socks, and a map and compass. Inform someone of your itinerary and before entering the backcountry or launching a boat check the National Weather Service watches, warnings, and advisories here. Follow Adirondack weather forecasts at Burlington and Albany and consult the High Elevation, Recreation, or Lake Champlain forecasts.

May 9th, 2019 – SPECIAL NOTICES » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 9, 2019

Great Adirondack Boat Race in Long Lake Sunday

great adirondack boat race 2019The men’s rowing teams from St. Lawrence University, SUNY Canton, and Union College, are set to meet for the 3rd Annual Great Adirondack Boat Race on Sunday, May 12, 2019 in Long Lake. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 9, 2019

Student Veterans Help Cleanup 120-Acre Boquet Preserve

TNC PSC students The Adirondack Chapter of the Nature Conservancy joined forces with a group of student veterans from Paul Smith’s College recently to hang trail signs, clear trash and perform other tasks to get the Boquet River Nature Preserve ready for the season.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Fish Scales and American Shad

american shad It’s tempting to simply view fish scales as armor, but there’s more to them than that. They provide camouflage; they also play a role in locomotion. For scientists working on the recovery of American Shad in the Connecticut River, scales provide a record of a fish’s life history and a way to measure the success of restoration efforts.

American shad is our largest river herring. The males, called bucks, run up to six pounds. The females, or row shad, up to four. Like their cousins alewife and blue-backed herring, shad are anadromous, spending most of the year in the ocean, then running up fresh water rivers like the Connecticut in spring to spawn. » Continue Reading.