Saturday, June 18, 2022

Adirondack animal babies: Nesting bluebirds, fawns, and loons

Since the time of my last column, I had two and a quarter inches of rain, which pushed many of my flowers to bloom and others to grow taller. The sweet peas are climbing the trellis about two inches a day. I guess the pellet fertilizer I gave them is working. The roses are covered with buds, and it looks like the plants are all coming up from the original plant, which is over twenty years old now.

My three trumpet vine honeysuckle vines are covered with blooms, which the hummers like. I fenced in my queen of the forest today (June 12) as the doe which dropped her fawn in the driveway yesterday, was munching close to that plant at daylight this morning.

I also put a fence around my cup plant (not because the deer eat it,) but when it gets to be six feet tall, the stems of the plant will not hold it up, so the fencing keeps it upright as it blooms. The bees love this plant and when it goes to seed, the warblers and goldfinch feed on the bugs and seeds from the flowers. Two Fall seasons ago, I caught six different warbler species feeding in the plant in two days.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 18, 2022

DEC, State Parks Announce 2022 Outdoor Photo Contest

hiker finds a moment of solitude on Giant Mountain during a busy weekendOn June 16, the state’s Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (State Parks) and Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced the launch of the 2022 Outdoor Photo Contest to highlight the best of New York’s natural beauty and special destinations among New York’s state campgrounds and parklands. The online contest runs for four months–through mid-October–with the winning images to be featured in statewide digital and print campaigns.

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Saturday, June 18, 2022

John Brown Lives! announces Juneteenth events this weekend

Westport, NY – John Brown Lives! (JBL!) is observing Juneteenth this weekend with a documentary film screening, live music, a dramatic performance, and the “Colors of Freedom” driving tour to significant sites of Underground Railroad and abolitionist activity in Essex and Clinton Counties.

Juneteenth is a national holiday that commemorates the effective end of slavery in the United States when, on June 19, 1865, federal troops finally arrived in Galveston, Texas to take control of the state and ensure the freeing of all enslaved people. Their freedom came two and a half years after President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation.

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Friday, June 17, 2022

Adirondack Interpretive Center Woods Walks: Saturdays, June 18 – Aug.13

ESF Adirondack Interpretive Center (AIC) staff are pleased to announce Woods Walks every Saturday during the summer season from June 18 through August 13.

The series of nature walks will kick off this Saturday, June 18 with the first walk dedicated to the memory of ESF Adirondack Interpretive Center friend Elaine Schwartz.

This walk and talk will be focused on award-winning poet Mary Oliver. Oliver’s poetry, inspired by nature, was rooted in her frequent walks in the woods. The Elaine Schwartz Memorial Woods Walk will begin at 10 a.m. Click here to register via email

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Friday, June 17, 2022

Live Music on the Shores of Lake George on Fridays, June 17- Sept. 2

Music enthusiasts of all ages are invited to enjoy live music on the shores of Lake George starting today, Friday, June 17 – Friday, September 2. “Fridays in Shepard Park” concert-goers can enjoy free live music from 6 – 9:30 p.m. The concert series is both kid-friendly and pet-friendly, and includes children’s activities such as a bounce house, a face painter, and an air brush artist.

See below for this year’s artists:

June 17 – Alex Torres & His Latin Orchestra + Stony Creek Band
June 24 – Ten Most Wanted + Jacquelin Mignot and The Family Band
July 1 – Soul Session + Yellow Dog
July 8 – The Refrigerators + Jett Screamer
July 15 – New York Players + Tumblin Dice
July 22 – Grand Central Station + The Ultimates
August 5 – Skeeter Creek + Bluz House Rockers
August 12 – TS Ensemble + The Ultimates
August 26 – Vivid from Connecticut + Jonathan Newell Band
September 2 – Kick + The Schmooze

(Note: No concert on Friday, August 19.)

Shepard Park is located at Centennial Fountain, Canada St, Lake George, NY 12845.

Photo at top provided by Adirondack Arts & Entertainment. 


Friday, June 17, 2022

Outdoor conditions (6/17): Hypothermia, a Year-Round Risk

outdoor conditions logoThe following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

NEW THIS WEEK:

Ferris Lake Wild Forest: Powley Road is open. All washouts have been repaired.

Speculator Tree Farm and Perkins Clearing: All roads and campsites are now open to the public. Old Military Road has been repaired and the Pillsbury Mountain Fire Tower parking area is open.

Flatrock Mountain Conservation Easement: The area south of Flatrock Mountain, including the gated logging road, will be temporarily closed to public access for timber harvesting by the landowner.

LAST WEEK:

Muddy Trails Advisory: DEC has lifted the Muddy Trails Advisory for trails above 2,500 feet in elevation. Some trails may still be muddy, especially at higher elevations. Please help reduce trail widening and erosion by walking through mud instead of around it.

Saranac Lakes Wild Forest: The access road to Saint Germain and Meadow Ponds has been repaired and is open.

 

General Notices

Visit the main Adirondack Backcountry Information page for more trip-planning resources, including travel information, weather resources, and seasonally-specific information about Adirondack recreation.

Know Before You Go (06/16): Be prepared for cooler temperatures this weekend. Daytime highs on Saturday are only expected to reach the mid-50s in places, with Sunday highs creeping into the mid-60s. Temperatures on mountain summits will be significantly colder, with high elevations approaching freezing. Dress in layers and bring rain gear. Take caution as stream, river, and other water crossings may swell following rain. Continue to pack bug spray, bug nets, and other methods of protecting from bites, as well as sun protection. Plan on arriving at your destination early and have several back-up plans in place in case parking at your desired location is full.

Check the Weather: Check the forecast for your destination and pack and plan accordingly. Check the National Weather Service Northern Adirondacks and Southern Adirondacks Mountain Point Forecasts for select summit forecasts. Check both daytime and nighttime temperatures and remember that temperatures will drop as you gain elevation.

Fire Danger: Check the fire rating map.

Water Conditions: Water levels throughout the Adirondack region are generally average for this time of year, with select waterways measuring slightly above or slightly below average. Check the USGS Current Water Data for New York for stream flow of selected waters. Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs aka lifejackets) are strongly recommended to be worn.

Hiking with Dogs: Dogs hiking in warm temperatures are at risk of experiencing heat exhaustion and death. If your dog does collapse, quickly move to create shade for the dog and cool their feet and stomach – this is the most effective way to help an overheated dog. The best way to protect your pet is to leave them at home.

Ticks: Wear light-colored clothing with a tight weave to spot ticks easily. Wear enclosed shoes, long pants, and a long-sleeved shirt. Tuck pant legs into socks or boots and shirt into pants. Check clothes and any exposed skin frequently for ticks while outdoors. Consider using insect repellent. Stay on cleared, well-traveled trails and walk in the center of trails. Avoid dense woods and bushy areas. Additional tips for tick prevention.

Bear Canisters Required: NYSDEC requires the use of bear-resistant canisters by overnight users in the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness between April 1 and November 30. NYSDEC encourages campers to use bear-resistant canisters throughout the Adirondack backcountry. Bear canisters should be used to store all food, food garbage, toiletries, and other items with a scent. Canisters should be stored a minimum of 100ft from tents, lean-tos, and cooking sites and kept closed whenever they are not being accessed. Learn more about bear canisters and avoiding human-bear conflicts.

Adirondack Rock Climbing Closures: DEC closes certain rock climbing routes in the Adirondacks to protect nesting peregrine falcons. For a full list of closures, visit Adirondack Rock Climbing Route Closures. Once peregrine nest sites are determined, climbing routes that will not disturb nesting will be reopened. Routes that remain closed will reopen after the young have fledged. Thank you for your cooperation. For more information please contact the Bureau of Wildlife at (518) 623-1240.

Adirondack Mountain Reserve: Parking reservations will be required May 1 through Oct. 31 for single-day and overnight access to the parking lot, trailheads, and trails located on the privately owned, 7,000-acre AMR property in the town of Keene in the High Peaks region. For a list of frequently asked questions and to register, visit AMR’s website.

Safety & Education

Spring is in full swing. Whether you’re going for a hike, a bike, a paddle, or fishing, Hike Smart NY can help you prepare with a list of 10 essentials, guidance on what to wear, and tips for planning your trip with safety and sustainability in mind.

Hypothermia: A Year-Round Risk

Hypothermia during warm weather months happens more often than one may think. Hypothermia occurs when your body’s core temperature drops. Signs of hypothermia include:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion or drowsiness
  • Confusion
  • Loss of feeling and dexterity in your extremities
  • A negative change in attitude
  • Slurred, slowed speech

Hypothermia can happen to anyone not prepared both physically and with the proper gear, including plenty of water and food. It may be a warm day, but when you begin to sweat and the temperature decreases as you gain elevation, your body temperature can drop quickly. This combined with dehydration can make you more susceptible to hypothermia.

To avoid hypothermia:

  • Keep hydrated and snack often. Hydration and food will keep you balanced and your electrolytes in check. Don’t forget that salty snack.
  • Bring layers and stay dry. Wet clothing will cause your body temperature to drop faster as the air becomes cooler. Change out of wet clothing. Layering will help keep you warm on summits and when you’re resting or descending the mountain. A lot of heat is lost through the head, so bring a hat.
  • Always be prepared. Always pack the ten essentials. Check the weather before you go, including summit forecasts, and pack for unpredictable weather. Leave your plans with someone.

Leave No Trace™

Follow the Seven Principles of Leave No Trace to maintain minimal impact on the environment and the natural resources of the Adirondacks. Use proper trail etiquette to ensure an enjoyable experience for yourself and others and tread lightly!

Protect Rare Species

The Adirondacks are home to rare and unique plant species that can only be found on our highest peaks. Of the six-million Adirondack acres, only 40 contain this elusive alpine vegetation. Alpine vegetation comes in all shapes, sizes, and colors, from vibrant purple flowers speckling the mountain to small clumps of grass poking out between the rocks. Located on the summits of 19 separate mountains, these species can only be found in the Adirondacks, making them very special and important to protect.

The plants found in our alpine areas are amazing, but they’re also extremely fragile. Here are some helpful tips you can use to help conserve Adirondack alpine vegetation:

  • Stay on marked trails or durable surfaces to avoid trampling delicate species.
  • Take lots of pictures, but never pick any of the plants that you encounter.
  • Familiarize yourself with alpine species and know which to be cautious around.
  • Take extra care when hiking, and never camp above 3,500 feet in elevation.

Friday, June 17, 2022

Latest news headlines

Here’s a look at news from around the Adirondacks this week:

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 16, 2022

The latest state, APA policy news

APA 50th anniversary logo

I know I previewed this in my last newsletter, but in case you didn’t get a chance to read it, here is my roundup of the four Adirondack Park constitutional amendments that didn’t get first passage this legislative session. The conservation design bill, legislation intended to protect more open space and natural resources when planning for some subdivisions, passed the Assembly but not the Senate. Also of note, a bill that brings forest rangers and environmental conservation officers’ retirements up to the same standards as State Police passed both chambers. We’ll see if Gov. Kathy Hochul signs it this time.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 16, 2022

Tupper Lake 8-Miler, Celebrate Paddling Invitational set for June 25-26

Paddling enthusiasts of all ages and abilities are invited to take part in two upcoming races, part of the month-long Celebrate Paddling ADK festival: the Tupper Lake 8-Miler and the Celebrate Paddling Invitational.

 

The Tupper Lake 8-miler will take place Saturday, June 25, with registration and check-in taking place 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. and the start time at 11 a.m. The race begins at the Town of Tupper Lake Boat Launch on Lake Simon Road, off New York State Route 30 — paddlers then head to the Route 30 bridge, up the Raquette River to the Oxbow, and then back to the boat launch. This is a New York Paddlesports Racing Association points race for canoes and kayaks; there will also be classes for stand-up paddle boards.

 

Entry fee is $35, with t-shirts going to the first 50 registrants; all proceeds will be donated to Adirondack Health Foundation’s Heart Health Initiative. There will also be awards and a post-race barbeque.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, June 16, 2022

Saranac Lake: First Annual Tri-Lakes Pride Event set for June 26

Saranac Lake, NY  –  The Adirondack North Country Gender Alliance is hosting a LGBTQI+ Pride event at Riverside Park in Saranac Lake on June 26 from 12 to 4 p.m.

The free event welcomes members of the LGBTQI+ community from Lake Placid, Saranac Lake, Tupper Lake and neighboring communities, along with their families, friends, supportive organizations, businesses and other allies.

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Wednesday, June 15, 2022

Join us for an Adirondack ‘summer listening tour’


This summer, we want to hear from you. What Adirondack issues are important to you? Is there more you'd like to see us report? What's happening in your community that we need to know about?

We are launching an "Adirondack Listening Tour" beginning June 22 and we hope you'll join us.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 15, 2022

NYS DEC: June 15 marks beginning of Black Bass Open Season

Today New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced that the open (harvest) season for largemouth and smallmouth bass, collectively known as black bass, begins Wednesday, June 15, and runs through November 30.

The June 15 opener is now the standard opening date for these species, replacing the third Saturday in June. For most of the state, a catch-and-release season exists from Dec. 1 through June 14. Special fishing regulations exist for some waters as outlined in the current fishing regulations guide and should be closely reviewed before heading out to fish.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, June 15, 2022

Memorial held for Forest Ranger Captain Christopher Kostoss

forest ranger report

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents statewide. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations, and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured, or distressed people from across New York State.

Town of Wilmington
Essex County
End of Watch:
 On June 9, hundreds of people paid their respects at a memorial for Forest Ranger Captain Christopher Kostoss. Captain Kostoss died by suicide on May 31. He served as a Ranger for 23 years and was involved in countless search and rescue missions.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 14, 2022

Traditional Father’s Day weekend events planned for Old Forge

Members of the Central Adirondack Association (CAA) are pleased to report that they will be hosting their traditional Father’s Day Weekend festivities in-person this weekend beginning with an Antique & Classic Car Rally that will kick off at 7 p.m. on the evening of Friday, June 17 at the North Country Market in Thendara, NY, and then cruise up and down Main Street. Those who wish to participate in the car rally are asked to line up in the North Country Market parking lot starting at 6:30 p.m.

The following day, Saturday, June 18, the 25th Annual Father’s Day Weekend Classic & Antique Auto Show will take place at the George T. Hiltebrant Recreation Center/Pavilion.  No pre-registration is necessary this year, instead registration will begin at 9 a.m. Vehicles are $20 per car, and spectators are admitted for free. Guests are encouraged to come spend the day viewing classic and antique cars of all makes and models while having a chance to win door prizes, purchasing food and beverages provided by North Country Market, and enjoying lively music.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 14, 2022

Summer Solstice festivities set for June 21 at the Old Forge Library

The Summer Solstice, also known as “the longest day of the year,” the day in 2022’s calendar with the most hours of daylight is Tuesday, June 21. Solstice celebrations are celebrated throughout the world and have been celebrated by our ancestors since Neolithic times.

The Old Forge Library, and its community partners and friends at Weaving Home, LivingADK, and the Old Forge Farmers Market invite the public to celebrate the solstice with them at festivities held on the library lawn at 220 Crosby Blvd. in Old Forge. Renowned Abenaki artists, writers and storytellers will make the occasion memorable.

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