Friday, August 21, 2020

Gypsy moth caterpillar damage common across the state

2020 has been a boom year for the Gypsy moth caterpillar, and the Department of Environmental Conservation has been receiving reports of unusually high Gypsy moth populations and leaf damage in several parts of New York State.

Gypsy moths are not native to New York, but they are naturalized into the eco-system, meaning that they will always be in our forests. They tend to have a population spike every 10 to 15 years, but it is usually offset by predators, disease, and other natural causes. The caterpillars are beginning to disappear now as they transition into the next cycle of their lives and become moths.

One year of defoliation is probably nor going to kill your trees, but over the course of a couple years it typically leads to tree death. The DEC will be monitoring Gypsy moth caterpillar populations to predict whether a major defoliation should be expected.

For more information on Gypsy moths in New York State, visit the DEC’s website.


Friday, August 21, 2020

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Friday, August 21, 2020

Outdoor conditions (8/21): Hiker information stations

This bulletin provides only the most recent notices. Check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for more detailed information on access, outdoor recreation infrastructure, and conditions.

Emergency Situations: If you get lost or injured; keep calm and stay put. If you have cell service, call 911 or the DEC Forest Ranger Emergency Dispatch, 518-891-0235.

Welcome to the Adirondacks. The Welcome to the Adirondacks webpage is the place to go if you are interested in learning more about the Adirondacks. It provides information about the Forest Preserve, conservation easement lands, outdoor recreation, and Leave No Trace.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 20, 2020

The difficult side of sickness

The fresh air cure wasn’t all a bed of roses.

First-hand accounts left behind in letters, photographs, diaries, and memoirs paint a picture of life in Saranac Lake during the TB years. It’s an incomplete record that can lead us to believe curing was an overwhelmingly positive experience.

It takes energy, time, and a degree of mental and physical well being to leave behind a personal record. People who were very ill, illiterate, or struggling with poverty did not have the same opportunity to create, or later preserve, accounts of their experiences.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 20, 2020

Robotic surgery system comes to Adirondack Health

Adirondack Health is one of the first health systems in the region to offer robotic-arm assisted total knee and total hip replacements with Stryker’s Mako System. This highly advanced robotic technology transforms the way joint replacement surgery is performed, enabling surgeons to have a more predictable surgical experience with increased accuracy.

The demand for joint replacements is expected to rise in the next decade. Total knee replacements in the United States are estimated to increase by 673 percent by 2030, while primary total hip replacements are estimated to increase by 174 percent. Yet studies have shown that approximately 30 percent of patients are dissatisfied after conventional surgery.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 20, 2020

Biological Control for Japanese Knotweed tested in New York

Japanese knotweeds (Reynoutria japonica, Reynoutria sachalinensis, and their hybrid Reynoutria X bohemica) are invasive plants that are infamously difficult to control and have negatively impacted ecosystems and economies in the US, Canada and Europe.

For several years, researchers have sought to find a biocontrol for knotweed. Biocontrols are species selected from an invasive species’ native range that are used to control the invasive species in its introduced range. This approach is more targeted than chemical methods, and when successful, it permanently suppresses the invasive species.

After extensive testing and review by federal agencies, in March of this year, an insect native to Japan called the knotweed psyllid (Aphalara itadori) was approved for release in the United States as the country’s first biocontrol agent for Japanese knotweed.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 20, 2020

Battle of Plattsburgh commemoration kicks off Aug. 23

The “Battle of Plattsburgh 2020 Virtual Commemoration” will be presented online at 1814inc.com starting Aug. 23.

It will feature 30-minute videos of various BOP related events and activities, interviews, music and other 1814 related info. Mountain Lake PBS will air two movies “The Final Invasion” and “Battle of Plattsburgh Bicentennial Commemoration,” which includes interviews with long term committee volunteers. WIRY radio will also broadcast interviews and music related to the battle.

There will be commemoration ceremonies open to the public at various 1814 historic sites in Plattsburgh and surrounding areas. 

 

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Ending the Campfire Prohibition on the Chain Lakes Makes No Sense

The 19,000-acre Essex Chain of Lakes between Indian Lake and Newcomb certainly has received lots of public attention. In 2007, it was a major part of the Finch, Pruyn and Company sale of 161,000-acres to the Adirondack Nature Conservancy, with help from the Open Space Institute.

Today, the first amendment to the Essex Chain of Lakes Primitive Area Unit Management Plan is up for public comment. Should it be approved? Before tackling that question, let us review.

What an earthquake the 2007 Finch, Pruyn sale felt like, with many aftershocks. It promised an exciting time for land conservation and for advocates for open space conservation like me and the nonprofits I worked with. It still is. It was a scary time for Finch employees, contractors, leaseholders, and many townspeople, including guides tied closely to the land and its future uses. The consequences of that land sale are still playing out and will continue to.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Hamilton Co. program connects people to fresh food

Farm fresh fruits and vegetables are a highlight of the Adirondack summer, but for those with limited incomes, this source of produce may be entirely inaccessible. A new offering at no cost to eligible seniors and individuals in need has been launched by a partnership of community groups this summer.

The Hamilton Healthy Food Connections program offers $20 nutrition certificates to all Hamilton County seniors who currently rely on delivered meals from the Warren/Hamilton County Office of the Aging meal sites. Hamilton County Community Action food pantry clients are also eligible.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Kayakers go missing on Union Falls Pond

forest ranger logoRecent NYS DEC Forest Ranger actions:

Town of Franklin
Franklin County
Wilderness Rescue: 
On Aug. 14 at 10:11 p.m., DEC’s Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from a woman reporting that her two friends were overdue from kayaking on Union Falls Pond. The 21-year-old woman and 22-year-old man from New City went to watch the sunset from their kayaks but their friends grew concerned when it got dark because the pair are not familiar with the area. Forest Ranger Baldwin responded to the camp and after interviewing members of the party, determined that the group had found one of the kayaks along the shore. Ranger Baldwin swept the road in the surrounding area before reaching out for assistance. Once cleared of a separate incident, Forest Ranger Praczkajlo responded to assist with the search and was on scene at 12:26 a.m. Forest Rangers fueled up and used the reporting party’s boat and began searching the area where the kayak was found. Rangers turned off the motor and yelled out for the missing kayakers. At 1:12 a.m., the Rangers heard the pair yelling for help from the shore and proceeded to pick them up. The overdue kayakers stated that when one of their kayaks flipped, they panicked and attempted to grab onto the other one, flipping it, and then swam to shore. Rangers Baldwin and Praczkajlo took the two kayakers back to their camp and the incident concluded at 2:18 a.m.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, August 19, 2020

The History of Blackface in the Adirondacks

funs famous fellowsFor a century and a half, white men “blacking up” and performing as blackface minstrels drew eager audiences to Adirondack halls and stages. Writer and independent scholar Amy Godine tracks the long uneasy history of this unabashedly racialized performance style from its antebellum introduction as a big-city circus act to its later revival as a locally-produced nostalgia act in Adirondack towns and cities.

Even into the 1960s, and long after blackface was widely recognized as racist, hometown blackface flourished on Adirondack stages. (Iterations still crop up in North Country college campuses.)

In a presentation coming up Thursday, Aug. 20 at 6 p.m., Godine explores the tenacious roots, representations and consequences of this toxic tradition in Adirondack life.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 18, 2020

When the secret’s out

People who spend a lot of time in the woods often develop favorite spots. I’ve had plenty of these over the years, and one of my chosen ones was a swimming hole in the Catskill Park.

I developed an affinity for this spot while living and working as a landscaper and dry-stone mason just outside of Woodstock after college. I loved doing this work because it was physically demanding and job sites were in scenic locations. Many days after work, my co-worker and I would be completely exhausted and overheated, so we’d take a drive to a place called the Blue Hole, a little-known swimming hole he’d discovered by word of mouth that was an easy walk from the road.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 18, 2020

Upper Saranac Foundation to fight invasives at Fish Creek

The New York State Environmental Protection Fund’s Park and Trail Partnership Grants program has awarded the Upper Saranac Foundation (USF) a $19,000 matching grant in order to allow for the expansion of successful efforts in controlling and preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS) in the USL watershed at Fish Creek Campground.

The Fish Creek AIS Spread Prevention and Containment Project protects the economic value of the area via recreation, tourism, sportsmanship and vacation home ownership, and provides clear waterways to these ends by combating invasive species. in order to maintain native species in their natural habitats, and to improve the water quality, ensuring sustainability of our natural resources for future generations. The USF will support this project by matching funding and services for a total budget of $26,000 dollars.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 18, 2020

Camping event benefits PSC’s climate fellowship program

Originally planned as a weekend-long in-person gathering of the Crua Community at Paul Smith’s College in New York’s Adirondacks, Werifesteria 2020 has been shifted into a worldwide virtual camping experience that you can do from anywhere Sept. 4-6. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Paul Smith’s College Climate Fellowship Program.

Registration is now open at https://www.cruaoutdoors.com/pages/werifesteria.

Guests will be encouraged to go camping in their backyard or at their favorite local camping spot. Those who share images and video from their experience on the event Facebook page will be entered into a drawing to win a Grand Prize Werifesteria 2021 VIP Experience at Paul Smith’s College among other Crua Outdoors prizes.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, August 18, 2020

DEC sets up pop-up hiker information stations

DEC logoIn an effort to provide increased education outreach, real-time updates and general information to hikers in the High Peaks region, DEC and Town of Keene stewards will staff hiker information stations at several high-traffic locations. We encourage visitors to stop by these locations for information about parking, alternative hiking locations, local land use rules and regulations, safety and preparedness, and Leave No Trace. Please visit us at the following locations:

  • Mid’s Park, Lake Placid: Friday, 1 p.m. – 7 p.m.
  • High Peaks Rest Area, Northbound Route 87: Sat. & Sun., 6 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
  • Marcy Field, Keene: Friday-Monday, 7 a.m. – 1 p.m.


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