Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Send us your story ideas; write for the Almanack

Is there something happening in your part of the Park that we should know about? Any topics we need to tackle? Let us know by commenting or sending an email to [email protected].

We also invite you to contribute! Looking for people who are interested in writing about Adirondack history, arts and culture, current events, and environmental, recreation and nature/wildlife topics. Review the basic guidelines below and get in touch at [email protected].

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Monday, July 20, 2020

Developer Rejects Conservation Design at Northville’s Woodward Lake – Again

Even during the summer’s pandemic, development submittals to the Adirondack Park Agency have not slowed very much. Case in point: the proposed developer of Woodward Lake in Fulton County has submitted additional information to the Adirondack Park Agency this month (of July). APA has issued multiple requests for additional information since the applicant, New York Land and Lakes LLC, Oneonta, NY, first submitted an application in 2018 to subdivide an undeveloped 1,100-acre lake and forest near Northville into 37 second home lots, driveways and onsite septic. There is no public water or sewer here and the applicant proposes none.

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Monday, July 20, 2020

ADK Takes Stance on High Peaks Use Recommendations

The ADK (Adirondack Mountain Club) Board of Directors voted last week to confirm the organization’s official position on when limits on recreational use, such as a permit system, are appropriate. ADK’s official position is summarized as the following:

It is the position of the Adirondack Mountain Club that before the state seeks to impose restraints on the freedom of the public to use and enjoy the forest preserve, such as a permit system, it must first make the appropriate investments to mitigate the effects on the resource by educating the public, increasing the Forest Ranger force, building sustainable trails, facilitating the spread of use throughout the Forest Preserve, and making determinations of high use based on the ongoing collection of objective data.

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Monday, July 20, 2020

Woodworkers, sawmills keep busy during pandemic

With more people stuck inside during the pandemic, DIY projects have spiked and local contractors have also seen their services in demand.
In a recent article on Adirondack Harvest’s website, author Tim Rowland speaks with area sawmill owners and woodworkers about how they are keeping busy.

CLICK HERE TO READ

Photo: Dave Warner Jr. saws rough cut lumber at the Wood Grain Sawmill in Keeseville. He said the mill he runs with his dad has been busy with orders this year, as people who are home have more time for wood-related projects. Courtesy of Adirondack Harvest.


Monday, July 20, 2020

‘Trees in Trouble’ Zoom conversation

On July 23 at 7 p.m., all are invited to join a virtual Cary Science Conversation featuring forest ecologist Gary Lovett. Gain insight into the forest pest problem, hear updates on the newest threats, and discover policy actions we can take to protect trees.

Trees play a critical role in keeping people and the planet healthy. They filter air pollution, reduce flooding, cool neighborhoods, provide wildlife habitat, and store carbon that would otherwise contribute to climate change. Unfortunately, trees are in trouble.

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Sunday, July 19, 2020

Theater students to perform socially distant musical

If you had asked youth theatre producer/director Kathleen Recchia six months ago what she’d be doing this summer, she would not have included Zoom Webinars or setting up a Drive-In Movie on her to-do list.
Normally at this time of year, she is preparing for the Book & Blanket Players annual summer musical-in-a-week program. She is still doing that but this year that involves a whole new skill set. Instead of cancelling the production, which normally involves an intense week of working together at Keene Central School with the performance of a full musical onstage at the end of the week, Recchia went about figuring out how to continue the program with new rules and new parameters.

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Sunday, July 19, 2020

Send us your story ideas

Is there something happening in your part of the Park that we should know about? Any topics we need to tackle? Let us know by commenting below or sending an email to [email protected].


Sunday, July 19, 2020

LPCA hosts drive-in concerts; at home programs

UPDATED: This concert has been canceled. See this post for details.

The Lake Placid Center for the Arts (LPCA) is excited to announce a slate of August events families can enjoy while following ongoing COVID-19 health and safety precautions.

August programming will kick off with a live, drive-in concert at the Horse Show Grounds in Lake Placid (5514 Cascade Road). On Saturday, Aug. 1 at 7:30p.m., The Uprooted Band featuring Michael Glabicki of Rusted Root (pictured here) will perform the multi-platinum album When I Woke in its entirety, part of a 25th anniversary tour. Tickets for Uprooted are $55 per car. Chairs and picnics will be allowed within designated parking spaces and a full list of details about the event can be found on the LPCA website.

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Sunday, July 19, 2020

Weekly news roundup


Saturday, July 18, 2020

It’s Debatable: Restore Mother Nature Bond Act

From the July/August 2020 issue of Adirondack Explorer, editors asked the question: “Is now the right time for New York to move forward with the Restore Mother Nature Bond Act?”
Below is the “YES” response, from John Sheehan of the Adirondack Council and “NO,” from Roger Dziengelski, retired woodlands manager, chief forester and senior vice president for Finch Paper in Glens Falls.
Weigh in with your thoughts in the comments section!

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 18, 2020

Grant funds Emergency Food Packages project through 2020

Sanctuary Farm in VermontvilleAdkAction and their partners have been awarded $225,000 from the Adirondack Foundation, as well as the Mother Cabrini Health Foundation, and the New York State Health Foundation to continue the Emergency Food Packages Project. The project provides healthy, locally grown food to Adirondack residents in need.

To date, over 2,300 food packages (about 35,000 meals) have been delivered to families with the help of 700 independent donors, and the Adirondack Foundations SUN Fund. Over $100,000 has been put into the local agricultural economy as well through this project, in turn supporting roughly 20 farms and 75 farmworkers. This new grant should double these results and assist AdkAction in building a program which will subsidize local food purchasing, and greatly increase Hub on the Hill’s food distribution capacity.

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Saturday, July 18, 2020

Lake Placid Sinfonietta Offers Virtual Happy Hours

Weekly concerts with the Lake Placid Sinfonietta have become a summer tradition in Lake Placid.  For years Wednesday evening concerts at the outdoor Paul White Memorial Shell, Sunday evening concerts at the LPCA, and annual concerts in Tupper Lake, Saranac Lake, North Creek and other Adirondack locations have been part of the experience of summer in the Adirondacks.  With the cancellation of the Sinfonietta’s 2020 performance season due to the covid-19 emergency, it feels like a very quiet summer.  

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 18, 2020

From the archive: 1995 microburst

Twenty-five years ago, on July 15, 1995, a crazy storm hit the Adirondacks.

We posted this 2011 story from the Almanack archive on the anniversary of the microburst on Wednesday, and readers chimed in with their own memories of the storm: https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2011/07/extreme-adirondacks-surviving-the-1995-microburst.html.

Here’s another one from 2009 about the storm, also known as the Great Adirondack Blowdown: https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2009/07/anniversary-of-the-great-adirondack-blowdown-of-1995.html

 


Friday, July 17, 2020

Brothers create DackMap app for real-time recreation updates

In the outdoor-rec world, apps can be quite an asset when planning trips. Powder Project shows backcountry ski trails in the area skiers currently are or will be going to. Mountain Project provides an immense and detailed amount of knowledge of climbing routes all over the world.

DackMap is a new app created by Nicholas and Luke LaScala, two brothers native to the Adirondack region. It’s free to download and use and available in the Apple store.

“It’s a live-based map that helps tourists and locals experience different businesses and find opportunities to recreate in a sustainable way,” said Nicholas LaScala.

Nicholas LaScala studied innovation entrepreneurship at Clarkson University, a program that serves as a business degree that also touches upon multiple aspects of the business world. A former marketing intern at the Adirondack Council and outdoor whitewater rafting guide in the Adirondacks, Nicholas puts together the social media and promotion side of the app, as well as coming up with the color scheme and the icons. 

» Continue Reading.


Friday, July 17, 2020

Asian Giant Hornet – Fact vs. Fiction

When the Asian Giant Hornet was discovered in Washington State Dec.19, it gave rise to a series of eye popping headlines and news stories.

The DEC has released a breakdown of the facts on this species in order to clear up any misinformation or anxiety in the general public. In North America, the Asian Giant Hornet has only been spotted in a small area in Washington state and British Columbia. There have been no AGH found anywhere else in the continent, east coast included.

New York has some common look-alikes, including the European Horney which is half an inch to an inch and a half in length, while the AGH is one to two inches in length.

The Asian Giant Hornet also does not attack humans unless you attempt to handle them, you are within 10 or so feet of their nest, or you are approaching a beehive that they are currently attacking. Their sting is more painful then the usual hornet due to their enormous size, but human deaths caused by AGH strings are extremely rare – about 12 per year worldwide. To put it in perspective, there are about 60 deaths a year in the U.S. alone from bee and hornet stings. However, the AGH will attack and destroy honeybee hives.

To find more information on these hornets, visit the NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets website. If you think you have found an Asian Giant Hornet, review the ID materials on the AGM website, or email photos and location information to [email protected].



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Support the Adirondack Almanack and the Adirondack Explorer all year long with a monthly gift that fits your budget.