Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Monitoring for European Cherry Fruit Fly – You Can Help

I love cherries! Especially sweet cherries. They’re delicious fresh, high in fiber, and loaded with vitamins, minerals, and beneficial antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds, which may lower your risk of developing certain cancers, heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and/or obesity.

Growing consumer education about the antioxidant health benefits of cherries appears to be creating increased demand for the fruit. Domestic cherry consumption in the United States is now around 2 pounds per person per year.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 14, 2020

The cycle of killing habituated bears continues

black bearSeveral campsites and lean-tos were temporarily closed in the High Peaks Wilderness on July 5 due to an aggressive black bear that had been roaming the area looking for human food.

A day later the state Department of Environmental Conservation captured and later killed the animal.

As DEC officials have often said to me in these situations, “A fed bear is a dead bear.”

What does that mean? It means if a bear gets food from humans too many times, it will get habituated to the food. The bear will then continue to seek out food from campers, especially when natural food sources aren’t available such as during dry years. In some cases, the bear will then get too close to people and be considered dangerous. In these situations, bears don’t win. Instead, they are killed.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Water, water everywhere, but still the need to conserve

Colleen rows the boat on Long Lake by Alexandra RoalsvigWhile recent rains have helped some parts of the Adirondacks, other parts are stuck in a dry spell that began with the mild winter.

On Tuesday, the Town of Long Lake told residents to stop washing their cars and watering their lawns to conserve water.

Long Lake’s water superintendent, Keith Austin, said a dry spell left the town unable to keep up with current demand. The system serves about 800 full-time residents and a seasonal population of 2,000 people in a typical year.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Proposed Rule Change for waterfowl hunting

duck decoys

Due to a slow, but steady decline in mallards across the northeastern United States, the mallard daily bag limit remains two birds (one hen) per day. Please see the Declining Mallards in the Atlantic Flyway (PDF) brochure for more information.

The Canada goose season length in the Northeast, West Central, East Central, Hudson Valley, and Lake Champlain zones remains 30 days with a limit of two per day. Please see the Status and Management of Atlantic Population Canada Geese (PDF) brochure for more information.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 14, 2020

NYers fear return of virus in latest Siena poll

coronavirusSixty-two percent of New Yorkers think that the worst of the coronavirus pandemic is still to come while only 27 percent think that the worst is over according to a new statewide survey of residents released Monday by the Siena College Research Institute (SCRI).

By 70-22 percent, residents prefer the government’s priority be containing the spread of the coronavirus, even if it hurts the economy, rather than restarting the economy, even if it increases the risk to public health.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, July 13, 2020

How the Honey Pot is Filled

Honey is the only food made by an insect that is eaten both by humans and the insect itself.  Bears, badgers and other animals also eat honey and have long been raiding the winter stores of their winged friends to harvest this tasty treat. 

Honey is a very stable food that naturally resists molds, fungi and other bacteria, allowing it to last for years without refrigeration.  It is well known that honey is made by a colony of honey bees living in a nest or in a hive if kept by a beekeeper.

A typical bee hive will house about 60,000 bees, most of them workers, industriously making honey and the honeycombs in which the honey is stored.  That’s a lot of honey bees, working very hard to produce honey for the colony.  It takes about 556 foraging bees to visit 2 million flowers, just to make a pound of honey!

» Continue Reading.


Monday, July 13, 2020

NY State Parks Explorer App

New York State Parks has kicked off the 2020 summer season by launching a “New York State Parks Explorer” mobile app, available for free on both iOS and Android devices.

The new app will provide visitors and potential visitors with helpful information regarding a variety of destinations and activities around New York States parks and historical sites. Some key highlights of the app are as follows:

» Continue Reading.


Monday, July 13, 2020

Registration open for the Great Adirondack Garage Sale

The Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism and local leaders are encouraging residents to register for the 10th annual Great Adirondack Garage Sale. Traditionally held each Memorial Day Weekend, the sale this year will take place on Aug. 7, 8, and 9.

The garage sale stretches over 150 miles through the Adirondacks, and includes residents in the towns of Old Forge, Inlet, Raquette Lake, Indian Lake, Blue Mountain Lake, Long Lake, Tupper Lake, Cranberry Lake, Piercefield, Newcomb, and Speculator. An interactive website showcases sale locations and allows unlimited photos of the items for sale to be uploaded.

Registration is free, and listings on the website include dates and times for each sale. Each community will also receive paper maps of local sale locations to hand out. To register and for more information, go to www.GreatAdirondackGarageSale.com.


Monday, July 13, 2020

What are your thoughts about dogs on the trails?

Dogs: Do they need to be hiking or should they stay home? To leash or not to leash? Those are the questions facing pet parents who want to include their furry four-legged companions on excursions.

Read up on hiking do’s and don’ts in this article that’s part of the July/August edition of Adirondack Explorer: https://www.adirondackexplorer.org/stories/dogs-in-the-adirondacks

And weigh in here with your thoughts and experiences.

Photo: Kim Douglas and her dog Stitch hike Haystack Mountain, a trail in the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness, where leashes are required. By Nancie Battaglia


Sunday, July 12, 2020

Restaurants adapt to COVID-19 changes

On March 16, restaurant managers and owners abruptly got notes that at 8 p.m. that night they would have to lock their doors and lay off their employees. Adirondack restaurants grew empty and dark. As national pandemic wreaked havoc throughout the country, many businesses struggled to stay afloat.

Some restaurants shut down in the wake of a national pandemic ,while others adapted by switching to takeout. Now that indoor and outdoor dining has resumed (starting with 50 percent capacity), how are restaurants faring?  

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 12, 2020

Local food: Sarah’s Blueberry Cake

For an old-fashioned twist on a blueberry dessert, try this delicious blueberry cake recipe, created and shared by a very dear family friend. The flavors of blueberry and lemon blend beautifully, making it a lovely addition to any summertime meal. You can top it with vanilla ice cream, more blueberries, or just enjoy it as is!

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 Cup Unsalted Butter (Softened)
  • 2 Cups Sugar
  • 4 Eggs, Well Beaten
  • 1 Cup Milk
  • 1 Tablespoon Lemon Juice
  • 3 ½ Cups All-Purpose Flour
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
  • 4 Tablespoons Baking Powder
  • 2 Cups Blueberries (Fresh or Frozen)
  • Zest of One Lemon (optional)
  • ¼ Cup Cinnamon Sugar Mixture 

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 12, 2020

Reducing Your Waste this Summer: Tips from the DEC

Summer is the time for outdoor barbeques, picnics and parties, and while you are having fun the DEC wants to remind us to reduce, reuse, and recycle our waste correctly this summer.

They’ve released a variety of tips and suggestions in their weekly newsletter to this end. To reduce waste, opt for reusable plates, cups, cutlery and napkins as opposed to the typical solo cups and paper pates for your next outdoor feast. You can learn to make your own drinks as well as opposed to using pre-mixed beverages that come in bulky plastic containers.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, July 12, 2020

Weekly news roundup


Saturday, July 11, 2020

Ride for the River self-paced event to take place July 17-26

The Ausable River Association (AsRa) and Bike Adirondacks (BikeADK) will be hosting their ninth annual “Ride for the River” event July 17-26.

This event was created in 2012 by the AsRA to celebrate the river and the resilience of local communities around the river after they were devastated by flooding caused by the tropical storm Irene. All proceeds from the event go to directly supporting the AsRA and their protection of the clean waters, healthy streams and diverse habitats of the Ausable River watershed. The 2020 Ride continues the celebration while raising funds to restore the damaged portions of the river and address the growing concern over road salt, particularly around Mirror Lake in Lake Placid.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, July 11, 2020

Poetry: Daisy Chains

Daisy Chains

Please peek you out, my fairy friend,

From that hiding place of leaves.

Under the buttercups you dance,

Beneath the age old eaves.

Bells of bright petals wreath your hair,

And ferns hem your lacy dress.

Twin fawns kiss you with their warm breath,

While doe kneels down to bless.

In childhood did you come to me,

And brushed away all the tears.

We laughed and skipped with fireflies,

To notes just we could hear.

I never told a soul about,

Our gold and glorious days.

With mauve-lit dells and make believe,

Those things a child would say.

I search and try to seek you out,

Let us weave more daisy chains.

Remember me… I have not changed,

And take my hand again.



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