Monday, August 14, 2017

Ancient Jefferson Co Pottery Reveals 16th Century Iroquoia

northern iroquoia groups A study published in the journal Science Advances demonstrates how decorations on ancient pottery can be used to discover new evidence for how groups interacted across large regions. The research, conducted by John P. Hart, Director of Research and Collections at the New York State Museum; Jennifer Birch, Assistant Professor at the University of Georgia; and Christian Gates St-Pierre, Assistant Professor at the University of Montreal, sheds new light on the importance of a little-understood Iroquoian population in upstate New York and its impact on relations between two emerging Native American political powers in the 16th century.

Iroquoians in northeastern North America are best known for the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) and Wendat (Huron) confederacies in upstate New York and southern Ontario. There are extensive early historic records of both groups. Descendants of these confederacies and their respective nations that remain in these areas today have rich oral traditions that speak to their histories before and after European contact. Archaeology fills out these records through the excavation and analyses of ancestral communities. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 14, 2017

Forest Landowners Take Note Of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

hemlock woolly adelgidEastern hemlocks (Tsuga canadensis) are one of the most beautiful conifers found in northern New York forests. It can take up to 300 years for them to reach mature heights of up to 70 feet and diameters of up to 3-feet. They commonly live for 500 years and can live for 800 years or longer. Many are among the oldest trees in the state.

In their northern range, they’re found at a variety of elevations (sea level to near 5000 ft.) and on a multiplicity of sites (hillsides, valleys, shorelines, glacial ridges). Hemlocks are commonly found growing in mixed stands, with yellow birch, sugar maple, northern red oak, white ash, American beech, and white pine and can be distinguished from pine and by their short, flat needles. » Continue Reading.


Monday, August 14, 2017

Creative Economy Event Planned For Saranac Lake

philip morrisThe Adirondack North Country Association (ANCA) and Traditional Arts in Upstate New York (TAUNY) have partnered to bring creative thinkers and planners together to discuss how the creative economy can invigorate North Country downtowns.

The presentation, “The Creative Economy: Re-imagining Our Rural Downtowns,” will take place at the historic Harrietstown Town Hall in Saranac Lake on Tuesday, August 22 at 7 pm. The event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided.

Throughout rural America a strong cultural sector helps create economic opportunity. The experiences of regional revitalization, including Philip Morris of Proctors theater in Schenectady, will be the focus of the presentation and roundtable discussion.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, August 14, 2017

Brown’s Raid 1777 Battle Re-enactment Weekend

Brown’s Raid 1777 Battle Re-enactmentFort Ticonderoga will host a two-day battle re-enactment highlighting the 1777 Brown’s Raid on Ticonderoga on Saturday and Sunday, September 9-10, from 9:30 am to 5 pm.

Programming throughout the weekend will highlight the American raid on Ticonderoga in their attempt to recapture the fort. Visitors will have the chance to learn about the Royal Navy’s role in the attack and experience the battle from a completely new angle on Lake Champlain aboard tour boat, Carillon. Atop Mount Defiance, learn about the guard of Rangers who had attacked British-held Fort Ticonderoga with their own cannon. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 13, 2017

Longest Adirondack Accessible Trail Being Built in Willsboro

trail builder Ama Koenigsh on the first day Tahawus Trails LLC began work on the new universal access trail at the Conservancy’s Boquet River Nature Preserve The Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Chapter is making upgrades to its Boquet River Nature Preserve trail network in the town of Willsboro. This summer, professional trail builders have been constructing a 1.5-mile loop trail in the uplands portion of the 110-acre preserve. When completed, this multi-use trail is expected to be the longest accessible forest trail in the region designed and built to meet the Federal Trail Accessibility Guidelines under the Architectural Barriers Act.

The new trail will have a minimal slope and a crushed stone surface that can accommodate walkers, runners, bikers, strollers, and wheelchairs. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 13, 2017

New Adirondack Research On Invasive Phragmites

Lake Placid Wetland - Phragmites Management TimelapsePractitioners from the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) and researchers from Cornell University published the results of a seven-year study evaluating management of Phragmites australis (Phragmites), an aggressive wetland invasive plant, in the Adirondacks.

Published in the latest issue of Biological Invasions, “Management of invasive Phragmites australis in the Adirondacks: a cautionary tale about prospects of eradication,” documents broad success in controlling the species and suggests that over 70% of infestations within the interior Adirondacks will eventually be successfully eradicated, allowing native species to recolonize.

Since 2010, APIPP has managed 334 infestations of Phragmites in the interior Adirondacks. As of 2016, 212 of these managed sites have been documented as Phragmites-free; 104 have been documented as Phragmites-free for three consecutive years and are deemed eradicated. Researchers point to two primary reasons for this success: Small size of Phragmites infestations upon discovery (average size is less than one acre); and APIPP’s sustained early detection, rapid response, and monitoring efforts. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, August 12, 2017

Adirondack Dog-Strangling Vine

swallow-wortThis summer, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has come through with a new hope for the forces of good. Its Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has opened a public comment period, ending on August 14, 2017, relating to the release of a non-native insect to control swallow-wort.

Sometimes called “dog-strangling vine,” this invasive plant from Eurasia doesn’t harm pets, but it does live up to its name as a strangler. There are two species of the perennial vine, and they are both adept at choking out wildflowers, forest seedlings, Christmas tree plantations, hay fields and other habitats. In the Eastern Lake Ontario region, it has proved capable of blanketing large tracts, hundreds of acres in some cases, to create permanent monocultures of tangled, toxic foliage. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, August 12, 2017

Tim Rowland’s Visit To Ausable Chasm

ausable chasmMany moons ago, not too far north of Old Forge, there was a tourist trap that — apparently believing that honesty was the best policy — gave itself the name of The Tourist Trap. It sold the usual fare of balsam-scented incense burners in the shape of a log cabin, birch-bark lamps and every piece of junk imaginable with a picture of a loon on it — all destined, in time, for some North Carolina yard sale.

As a child in search of a meaningful memento costing south of 75 cents, I invested in a “paperweight” that was a river pebble that had been covered with postage stamps and apathetically lacquered. This artifact stayed with me for a remarkably long period of time, serving not as a reminder of the Adirondacks, but as a reminder to stay out of tourist traps. » Continue Reading.


Friday, August 11, 2017

2 Arrested For Leaving Intoxicated Mooers Man

Scales of Justice (public domain)New York State Police have arrested a man, 34, and a woman, 26, both of Mooers, for Criminally Negligent Homicide following an incident the night of March 4, 2017  in which police say the two dropped off Jason Guay, 42, also of Mooers, whose body was found the next morning on State Route 11, approximately 500 feet from his residence.

“Guay was reportedly highly intoxicated, and overnight temperatures had reached approximately -5 degrees Fahrenheit,” according to a statement from the New York State Police announcing the arrests. “These arrests are the result of a five month long investigation in conjunction with the Clinton County District Attorney Andrew Wylie,” State Police said. » Continue Reading.


Friday, August 11, 2017

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, August 11, 2017

John Hancock’s Table Acquired By Ticonderoga Hancock House

john hancocks tableThe Ticonderoga Historical Society has received the donation of a table that was once in the “banqueting hall” of the original John Hancock mansion in Boston. The table was the gift of Benn and Claire Eilers of Bend, Oregon.  Benn Eilers is a descendant of Hancock’s sister-in-law, Sarah Quincy.

With leaves that extend to 30 feet, the table is constructed of birds-eye walnut, a relatively rare wood. It is believed that George Washington dined at the table while visiting the Hancock House in Boston in 1789, during Hancock’s time as Governor of Massachusetts. » Continue Reading.


Friday, August 11, 2017

The Big Adirondack News Stories This Week


Thursday, August 10, 2017

Take Adirondack Explorer With You

The Adirondack Explorer has a new app, optimized for phone and tablet screens, that has everything you love about our bimonthly magazine focusing on the issues important to the Adirondacks.

And now the stories can include videos, additional photos, audio, and links to other stories to help readers gain a better understanding of what’s going on in the Park. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 10, 2017

Field Work Begins In Controversial Adirondack Rail Corridor

Draft Adirondack Rail Trail PlanWork to develop the final design and construction plan for the Adirondack Rail Trail began in the rail corridor between Tupper and Lake Placid this week.

DEC announced that “that personnel involved in developing the final design and construction plan for the Adirondack Rail Trail will be working in the corridor,” starting Monday, “for periods of times at various locations over the two months doing various work.”  More specific schedules are expected to provided to adjacent landowners via notification letters in the coming weeks.

Personnel from DEC, Creighton Manning, and other consultants are expected to be in the rail corridor between Tupper Lake and Lake Placid “assessing, investigating, and surveying infrastructure, natural areas, and other places in the corridor to prepare for permitting, designing, and constructing the multi-use trail. The work will be undertaken over the next many weeks and includes, but is not limited to engineering surveys, wetland delineations, geotechnical explorations, and property boundary survey.”  The historic railroad transportation corridor remains the subject of ongoing litigation. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 10, 2017

Adirondack Outdoor Recreation Conditions This Weekend (Aug 10-13)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Send observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

SPECIAL NOTICES FOR THIS WEEKEND
» Continue Reading.


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