Tuesday, January 19, 2021

NYS Food Waste Law: Is Your Community Ready?

compostIn a little over 12 months, the New York State Food Donation and Food Scraps Recycling Law will take effect, requiring businesses that generate an annual average of two tons or more of wasted food per week to donate excess edible food; and recycle all remaining food scraps if they are within 25 miles of an organics recycler.

AdkAction and their newest project, Compost for Good, are hosting a Zoom event on January 20th from 10-11:30am. The event is designed to help municipal officials and community advocates understand the new law, and to introduce various options for composting. Representatives from NYS DEC will join us to discuss the new law as well as the Climate Smart Communities program. There will be a question and answer session after the presentation.

To register for this event, visit adkaction.org/event/municipal-composting/

Cornell University has created a model that converts campus-generated organic waste into rich compost. It won a 2009 Environmental Quality Award from the U.S. EPA. – Cornell CALS photo/Almanack archive


Monday, January 18, 2021

Window restoration: A panestaking task

By Joanne Uris, Great Camp Sagamore

Even if snow removal isn’t necessary this winter (yeah, right!), Great Camp Sagamore’s Director of Facilities, and Assistant Caretaker, will have plenty of indoor work to keep them busy. Ted and Richard are restoring seventy windows in the Chalet and the Carpenter and Boat Shop.

The labor-intensive process for each window consists of six steps: strip existing paint and glazing, prime, reglaze, prime new glazing, paint two coats.

At the start of the project, it took a minimum of one hour to deglaze each window.  Chipping away at the glazing, and using a heat gun, resulted in occasional breakage of glass.  Twelve windows in, there had to be a more efficient way.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, January 18, 2021

Keep Standing Dead Trees in your Woodlot

Some of the most important trees in your woodlot are the ones that are no longer alive. Large, standing dead or dying trees—called snags—are an important part of healthy forests and a critical habitat feature for wildlife. They provide places for many birds and mammals to forage, den, nest, perch, and roost. Snags are very important for cavity-nesting birds like woodpeckers, nuthatches, and chickadees; for bats that roost within cavities, crevices, and flaky bark; and for countless species that rely on insects, fungi, and lichens as a food source. As long as they aren’t in a hazardous location such as near a road or building, consider leaving snags for wildlife.

In woodlands where snags are sparse or absent, it’s possible to create a few by topping, girdling, or simply leaving several mature trees as legacy trees that may become snags in the future.

Biologists recommend having at least three large snags (>12” diameter) per acre to benefit wildlife. These stately spires also add structural complexity, provide an element of visual interest, store carbon, reflect a forest stand’s past, and will enrich soils in the future.

Photo by Katherine Yard.


Monday, January 18, 2021

Winners Announced in LPCA’s First Zoom Playfest

The Lake Placid Center for the Arts has announced the winners of their Zoom Play Festival. The contest was held in late August for theatre artists to create and share a play over Zoom. LPCA plans to present a showcase of the winning pieces, as well as the honorable mentions on February 19.

Collaboration with Directors and Theatres has begun in order to produce the works, with LPCA having plans to produce several of the plays they received in-house. They received over 135 short plays that were submitted from all over the world, from New Zealand to Canada. The great number of submissions required help from several playwrights and artists around the country to help evaluate the plays, which were scored in areas like plot development, character voice, and adherence to the submission criteria.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 17, 2021

Driving the Northway with Paul Schaefer

As the decade of the 1990’s began, noted Adirondack conservationist and wilderness coalition leader Paul Schaefer’s eyesight was failing. He had macular degeneration. We had noticed that this skilled carpenter, home and cabin builder and historic restorationist was no longer hitting the nail squarely on its head.

We worried about him continuing to drive. Some of us were eager to drive him to meetings or to his Adirondack cabin and, increasingly, he accepted our invitations. He had a lot to say to those who drove him or sat with him in his living room or at his Adirondack cabin before a blazing fireplace. Paul liked his fires hot.

His larger-than-life experiences, salted with many humorous moments, crackled along with the logs in his hearth. Paul laughed heartily in recounting his adventures, and those of us privileged to sit with him joined right in.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 17, 2021

Grants Available to Restaurant Businesses

EAT ADK Restaurant WeekIn order to help support small business during the COVID-19 pandemic, up to $3,000,000 in reimbursement grants at $5,000 per business is being offered to eligible applicants. This program, lead by “Raising the NYS Bar Restaurant Recovery Fund” was created in support of full-service restaurants, arguably the industry hit the hardest by the pandemic, during the winter months where temperature and weather prevents outdoor dining.

To qualify for the program, an establishment must: 

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 17, 2021

Weekly news round up

A collection of interesting reads:

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 16, 2021

Helpful neighbors find pet pig on the lam

frank the pigFile under “only in the Adirondacks”:

A pet Vietnamese potbelly pig owned by the Gallaher family in Jay decided to go off on an adventure recently, only to be quickly rounded up thanks to the help of concerned neighbors.

An item in the Jay Community News email news digest on Jan. 9 spoke to the quick actions of getting “Frank the Lady Pig” back home safely:

“THANKS TO EVERYONE WHO LOOKED OUT FOR FRANK THE LADY PIG!
We just wanted to send a HUGE thank you out to everyone, especially Bobby Meconi, who called, texted, and spread the word (so quickly!) and Gary Dreiblatt who posted here on JCN that Frank was wandering off the property today. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 16, 2021

Virtual Hike Challenge aims to help hemlocks

Do you live within the Saint Lawrence/Eastern Lake Ontario Region? Or do you like to get outdoors there? If so, NYS DEC friends SLELO PRISM are hosting their Virtual Hiking Challenge this winter, encouraging and challenging hikers to hike for the protection of the region’s hemlocks (and for cool prizes.)

The challenge will last through March, and you may participate anytime you choose to get outside. In order to participate, all you need to do is go for a hike, and check the hemlock trees for signs of invasive hemlock woolly adelgid, and share a photo.

To find out more information about the challenge, including featured trails, check out the SLELO PRISM website!


Saturday, January 16, 2021

Adirondack Report: State of the State and other updates

This week, I listened in on Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s four State of the State presentations (click here for article about Monday’s address). Next week, we’ll get Cuomo’s budget presentation for 2022. That doesn’t get passed until April, but it will be interesting to see how the state fills this $15 billion hole.

Over the last couple of weeks, I’ve had a few stories posted online for you. In case you missed them, one was about a new connector trail between the Town of Newcomb’s beautiful High Peaks Overlook park and Goodnow Mountain. The trail isn’t 100% finished, but the hope is it will be next year. Read more about that here.

There’s more news, too, about the Town of Lake Luzerne’s request for a map amendment to the Adirondack Park Agency. Through the public comments that I filed a Freedom of Information Law request for, we found some preliminary information about a homeowner looking to develop his property in the area. We also found a number of neighbors against the map amendment, but a few local business owners in favor. Read more on that here.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 16, 2021

Annual Speculator craft fair to resume this summer

After a cancelation in 2020, this year’s Speculator Craft Fair will be Thursday, Aug. 12, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the ball field at 2834 State Route 30, across from the village beach here.

Sponsored by the Hamilton County Twigs, this juried craft fair features 150 booths of quality handmade goods. Fees are $50 for an outside spot and $60 for a spot in the pavilion. For a vendor application call Barbara Oakes at 518-548-5790 or email her at [email protected].

The craft fair is a fundraiser to support emergency medical and health care in the area. Last year $30,000 donated by the Twigs helped four non-profit organizations meet their needs: Speculator, Wells, and Piseco volunteer ambulance squads and the emergency “fly-car.”


Friday, January 15, 2021

Surviving The Freeze: Animals in Winter

Winter in the mountains is marked by abundant snowfall.  As mountain residents we are hard wired for winter preparation.  When the trees have shed most of their leaves and become an array of barren branches, we like the squirrels are diligently preparing for a long, cold winter.  Barbeque grills and lawn furniture get tucked away, wood piles are stacked wide and tall, fuel tanks filled, snow blowers fueled up and snow shovels are conveniently propped near the entrance of homes.

We are prepared and equipped for nature’s cold, white glitter we call snow.  With the average daily winter temperature being approximately sixteen degrees, double stuffed jackets, insulated boots and hat & mittens become the general attire.  We have our own form of hibernation as we load our cupboards with yummy snacks and settle in for a Netflix marathon.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, January 15, 2021

Public hearings on Debar coming up Jan. 19

debar pond lodgeDebar Mountain Complex Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement (DGEIS) and Draft UMP Public Comment Opportunities: DEC and APA will be conducting two virtual public hearings on Tuesday, January 19, 2021. Due to restrictions related to COVID-19, these hearings will not be held in person. To participate, please select one of the hyperlinks below at the scheduled time:

  • From 1:30 p.m. – 4 p.m: https://tinyurl.com/DeBarAfternoon
    • To receive a call back, provide your phone number when you join the event, or call the number 1-518-549-0500 and enter the access code: 179 267 0779
  • From 6 p.m. – 9 p.m: https://tinyurl.com/DeBarEvening
    • To receive a call back, provide your phone number when you join the event, or call the number 1-518-549-0500 and enter the access code: 179 337 3417

Friday, January 15, 2021

Outdoor Conditions (1/15): Dress for success

The following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

High Peaks Wilderness:

  • Colden Caretaker Report 01/13/21: Eleven inches of snow has accumulated at the Colden Caretaker cabin. Sixteen inches of snow has accumulated on summits. Snowshoes are needed, including to get to Avalanche Lake. The Marcy Dam truck trail is skiable with some thin sections. Snowpack on the Van Hoevenberg trail to Adirondack Loj is very thin but is skiable. Both Avalanche Lake and Lake Colden are frozen.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, January 15, 2021

Latest news headlines

Here’s a look at news from around the Adirondacks this week:

» Continue Reading.