Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Webinar Wednesday: chats with elected officials, chamber

Courtesy of Adirondack North Country Association‘s weekly newsletter, here are some upcoming webinars:

Wednesday, May 13, 10:00 a.m.: Conversation with our Legislators (Congresswoman Elise Stefanik, Senator Betty Little, Assemblyman Dan Stec, Assemblywoman Carrier Woerner), hosted by Adirondack Regional Chamber of Commerce

Wednesday, May 13, 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.: Back to Business: What You Need To Do Before You Reopen, hosted by the North Country Chamber of Commerce. Register ahead for the morning training or the afternoon session.


Monday, May 11, 2020

The Waggle: Interpretive Dance of the Honey Bee

honeybeeHoney bee colonies contain three distinct castes of individuals.  Each hive contains a single female queen, tens of thousands of female workers, and anywhere from several hundred to several thousand male drones during the Spring and Summer.

Female workers bees are solely responsible for bringing two main resources back to the hive.  These two resources both come from a flower: nectar and pollen.  These workers diligently search for flowers with the most of these two resources which are vitally important for the survival of the hive.

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Monday, May 11, 2020

Tupper Arts Little Loggers Kids Show Series

This summer, every Friday morning at 11 AM throughout the months of July and August, Tupper Arts will be presenting the Little Loggers Kids Show Series—a series of events that includes interactive children’s shows, music, magic, dance and theater. The shows take place at the Tupper Lake Sunset Stage Bandshell on the water, come at no cost, and lunches will be provided immediately after courteous of the Aseel Family Fund.

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Monday, May 11, 2020

Wild Center hosts climate change summit for teachers

The Wild Center is planning a virtual “Stay-In-stitute” for Climate Change Education.

Scheduled for  July 22-24, from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., the institute aims to bring together both middle and high school teachers from across the country and from a variety of disciplines, to engage in an active exploration of climate change, and the best educational practices related to it.

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Sunday, May 10, 2020

Art in the Pandemic –  Distraction, Solace and Direction

In SuspensionMarch to April 2020       24×48”  acrylic on canvas

I have finished a painting, In Suspension, that began six weeks ago, on March 16, when I set off for a day of painting in wilderness isolation. I had just made the stressful decision to cancel my upcoming solo show in New York City due to impending closures in response to the COVID-19 crisis. That day I should have been packing paintings for the show, but instead I headed for a waterfall within an easy drive, seeking distraction and solace.

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Sunday, May 10, 2020

Poetry: My Harbor

My Harbor

A bottomless moat between us widens like a sea wall,
Against the waves that threaten.
I cry raindrops, in a city cordoned like a stone cage,
Impenetrable.
“Help me!”, I cry out.
Your answer echoes softly, “I am here.”,
So faintly, so faintly,
Wistful words floating through the burdened air,
Dangerous ether kept at bay, at a distance,
Only by distance.
Like a ship stranded in a windless ocean,
I cannot raise my sails, I cannot find my course,
I cannot navigate,
Until you speak again, “I am here.”
True North, true North, you are my harbor.
Sweetest breeze plays upon my face, pure,
As I see your light breaking through the bleakest of mist,
To light my way home, and I know
I am saved.

Read More Poems From The Adirondack Almanack HERE.


Sunday, May 10, 2020

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Sunday, May 10, 2020

Happy Mother’s Day

In honor of Mother’s Day, a few stories from the Almanack archive:

Ruffed GrouseThe Ruffed Grouse: Defender of young

In late spring many infants are emerging from the safety of their den or nest and most mothers try to provide some form of protection from potential danger to their babies. Perhaps the most remarkable display of parental courage for a creature of its size is seen in the hen ruffed grouse. This bird will aggressively confront and challenge any human that happens to come too close to its recently hatched chicks.

From Tom Kalinowski: https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2018/05/adirondack-wildlife-ruffed-grouse.html

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Saturday, May 9, 2020

Bald Eagle: America’s ‘comeback kid’

The bald eagle is not only our nation’s most recognizable natural symbol, and the only eagle found exclusively in North America, it is also the Endangered Species Act’s most prominent success story, and a reminder of how important are the protection of our wildlife, critical habitat and natural resources generally.

Populations of breeding pairs of bald eagles in the lower forty-eight states crashed in the late 1960s to just over 400 pairs, due to hunting, habitat destruction and most prominently, the use of chemical pesticides in agriculture, such as DDT. In a scary process, known as “biomagnification,” bald eagles, being an apex predator at the top on their food chain, and feeding mainly on  fish, occasional small rodents and carrion, in other words, wildlife which had themselves absorbed toxins in various forms ultimately from pesticide-laden vegetation or runoff from agricultural fields, suffer highly concentrated, elevated levels of these toxins, negatively impacting birth and mortality rates. Calcium deficiencies caused by the toxins resulted in the thinning of eggshells, which would collapse under the nesting female’s weight, causing a nosedive in successful eaglet births.

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Saturday, May 9, 2020

Quarantine reads: Excerpt from ‘Mountain Shadows’

Set in 1925, Mountain Shadows (written by Lake Placid native Patti Brooks) tells the tale of a poor, young couple, Joe and Alice Devlin, who come to the Adirondacks seeking a cure for the wife’s tuberculosis. Alice is placed in a “cure cottage” in Saranac Lake. Joe, a wiz of an auto mechanic, lands a job in the Lake Placid Club’s garage. Finding that Alice’s treatment costs far more than the Club can pay him, Joe takes up with bootleggers who are running liquor from the Canadian border through the Adirondacks to the big cities farther south.

(Introduction to the excerpt:  Joe Devlin has been accosted and left for dead on his walk from NYC to Saranac Lake in order to be with his wife who is taking the TB cure.)

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Saturday, May 9, 2020

From the archive: High Peaks Plans

Monique and mountains at Boreas PondsHot topic: From two years ago, Bill Ingersoll takes a critical look at unit management plans (UMP) for the High Peaks and Boreas Ponds:

“The scope of these two documents far exceeds the available time to read and assess everything they contain, but even with a cursory review it is abundantly clear that our state agencies are failing to meet the public’s expectations.”

Read here: https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2018/05/high-peaks-plans-should-respect-public-opinion.html

Photo courtesy of Lorraine Duvall

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Saturday, May 9, 2020

New York’s state symbols: how many can you identify?

Did you know that garnet is the official mineral of New York State? Or that the nine spotted lady beetle, or ladybug, is the official insect? These natural symbols celebrate some of what makes New York a special place to live. Learn about all 11 Symbols of New York and then play a game of I Spy the next time you head outside to #recreatelocal. How many of the 11 symbols can you find?

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Friday, May 8, 2020

Bald Eagle: National symbol, bird of ‘bad moral character’?

Part one of two about the bald eagle

Ben Franklin, the statesman, philosopher, naturalist, inventor and all around Renaissance Man, was not all that thrilled with the choice of the Bald Eagle as our national symbol, and seemed to prefer the wild turkey as a utilitarian symbol, which is uniquely American, and often spelled the difference between our wilderness forefathers eating or starving. In a letter to his daughter, Franklin said, in part…..

“For my own part I wish the Bald Eagle had not been chosen the Representative of our Country. He is a Bird of bad moral Character. He does not get his Living honestly. You may have seen him perched on some dead Tree near the River, where, too lazy to fish for himself, he watches the Labour of the Fishing Hawk (osprey); and when that diligent Bird has at length taken a Fish, and is bearing it to his Nest for the Support of his Mate and young Ones, the Bald Eagle pursues him and takes it from him. 

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Friday, May 8, 2020

Essential Workers in History

Saranac Lake’s tuberculosis economy depended on the labor of many essential workers. In honor of today’s heroes, here are a few favorite stories of brave helpers in local history.

Nurses and doctors risked their own health providing care and companionship to tuberculosis patients far from home. Our museum archive is full of hundreds of photos and stories of these courageous women and men. In her book, Wish I Might, Isabel Smith writes warmly about her doctor, Francis B. Trudeau. He is somewhat overshadowed in history by his famous father, founder of Saranac Lake’s TB industry, Dr. E. L. Trudeau. But Francis was widely respected for his kindness and his fierce dedication to his patients. Ms. Smith described his “inimitable hearty roar of good spirits which, then and always, enveloped me like a blaze of sunlight.”

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Friday, May 8, 2020

Adirondack Mountain Club extends property closures

johns brook lodgeFollowing Governor Cuomo’s announcement of a more detailed New York Forward reopening plan for New York State, ADK (Adirondack Mountain Club) is postponing the reopening of its lodging facilities until the North Country is allowed to reopen its businesses and New York reaches Phase 3 of the state reopening process. At this time, ADK is cancelling all lodging reservations through June 1 and will continue to monitor the recommendations of the state and federal government across our region.

This applies to the following locations:

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