Tuesday, June 7, 2022

Adirondack Architectural Heritage receives $750,000 National Park Service grant

Keeseville – The National Park Service has awarded Adirondack Architectural Heritage a Paul Bruhn Historic Revitalization Grant for the Adirondack Rural Revitalization Program.

This $750,000 grant will fund capital rehabilitation grants for historic main street and agricultural buildings in and around the hamlets and villages of the Adirondack region.

Erin Tobin, executive director of Adirondack Architectural Heritage, said, “The Adirondack Rural Revitalization Program will help drive investment in our North Country communities, providing assistance to small business owners and nonprofits while encouraging rehabilitation in our historic community cores.”

“The Paul Bruhn Historic Revitalization Grants program fosters economic development in rural communities through the rehabilitation of historic buildings,” said NPS Director Chuck Sams. “With these funds, our state, Tribal, local government, and non-profit partners can develop subgrant programs and select individual projects that will support the economic development goals and needs in their communities.”

These grants mark the fourth year of funding for the program honoring the late Paul Bruhn, executive director of the Preservation Trust of Vermont for nearly 40 years. See the National Park Service’s website for more information about the grant: https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1207/paul-bruhn-2022.htm

Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) preserves the architecture and communities of the Adirondack region through education, action, and advocacy.

For more information contact Samantha Johnson, Administrative Director, AARCH, 518-593-0356, [email protected]

Photo at top: Main Street, Malone (Photo Credit: Christine Bush)


Monday, June 6, 2022

An ode to an Elder Tree

bob and charlotte hall at the elder tree

Editor’s note: Adirondack Explorer board member Charlotte Hall wrote this poem about Tree 103. Believed to be one of the tallest trees in the state, Tree 103 toppled in December 2021 after spending its life as part of a group of giant white pines known as “Elder’s Grove,” near Paul Smith’s College’s Visitor Information Center (VIC).

Charlotte (pictured here with her husband, Bob) read “Elder Tree” on a tour of the Elder Grove during Paul Smiths VIC’s Big Tree Festival in May.   Click here to watch Charlotte reading her poem

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Monday, June 6, 2022

Saranac Lake: Community events set for Invasive Species Awareness Week, June 6-12

lake flower boat stewards

New York’s Invasive Species Awareness Week (ISAW) is Monday, June 6 through Sunday, June 12, with several community events planned in Saranac Lake.

ISAW is a statewide effort to promote public understanding of invasive species and increase knowledge on the impacts they have on our waterbodies and woodlands. Local events will take place on June 6 and 8 and are co-sponsored by the Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute (AWI) and The Nature Conservancy’s Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP).
“Our Adirondack waterways, forests, and farmlands are important for recreation, economic sustainability, and basic ecosystem functions,” said AWI Deputy Director Zoë Smith. “The annual Invasive Species Awareness Week is a chance for people learn about protecting our beloved lakes, rivers and forests from invasive species that threaten our environment and cause irreparable harm.”

Monday, June 6, 2022

New York Invasive Species Awareness Week is June 6 -12

The mission of the New York Invasive Species Awareness Week (NYISAW) is to promote knowledge and understanding of invasive species and the harm they can cause. We want to empower YOU to stop the spread of invasive species!

Organizations across all of New York State are offering a variety of engaging events, such as interpretive hikes, volunteer days, webinars, movie screenings, and fun family activities!

By participating in NYISAW, you can help protect your community’s natural spaces, learn about new invasive species, meet your neighbors, get outdoors, and even win prizes!

Find events near you!

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Monday, June 6, 2022

Uninvited: The Spread of Invasive Species film screening set for June 8

A viewing of the film, Uninvited: The Spread of Invasive Species, will be hosted at the Hotel Saranac on Wednesday, June 8th at 6:30 p.m. The Great Hall Bar will be open and experts will be on hand to introduce the film and discuss local actions.

Co-sponsored by Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute and the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program, and developed by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, the documentary is a professionally produced 60-minute film about the threat invasive species pose to food systems, water, public health, and ecosystems in New York State. See the trailer.

The event is part of New York’s Invasive Species Awareness Week, June 6-12. For more information, visit adkwatershed.org and adkinvasives.com.

Photo at top provided by Zoë Smith, Deputy Director for Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute.

 


Sunday, June 5, 2022

Harvest of the Month | Rhubarb

rhubarb

Rhubarb is a perennial spring vegetable that grows abundantly from May to July in the Adirondacks. Rhubarb is in the plant family Polygonacea along with knotweed and buckwheat. While the plant is technically a vegetable, the tart edible stalks of the plant are most commonly thought of as a fruit, and is eaten in sweet preparations.

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Sunday, June 5, 2022

Gov. Hochul announces largest number of new solar projects to date

solar panels

22 large-scale projects will power more than 620,000 New York homes

Governor Kathy Hochul announced awards for 22 large-scale solar and energy storage projects that will deliver enough clean, affordable energy to power over 620,000 New York homes for at least 20 years. As the state’s largest land-based renewable energy procurement to date, these projects will spur over $2.7 billion in private investment and create over 3,000 short- and long-term jobs across the state. The awards accelerate progress to exceed New York’s goal to obtain 70 percent of the state’s electricity from renewable sources by 2030 on the path to a zero-emission grid by 2040 as required by Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act. These awards will strengthen the state’s current pipeline of renewables to power over 66 percent of New York’s electricity from renewable sources.

The 22 large-scale renewable energy projects by region are:

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Sunday, June 5, 2022

Weekly news round up

A collection of interesting reads:

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Saturday, June 4, 2022

Yellow Lady Slippers Sighting, Banding Hummingbirds at Stillwater

Maybe the black flies have taken it in the shorts with all the hot days we’ve had. I put in the garden over the weekend and not once did they take the hoe out of my hand. I did have a few deer flies that wanted to help me and some mosquitoes and no-see-ums that were trying to help.

This is the third year that deer flies have come out before the first of June. Normally, they never boomed me until the beginning of July. When they come out, it usually means the end of black flies. Hopefully all 36 varieties hatched out together on those hot days that warmed up the streams that they hatch out of. Some of the intermittent streams that had eggs may not have even been flowing, which did them in; one can only hope.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 4, 2022

MAKE IT: Southwestern Squash and Corn Soup

I love summer squash, and eat as much of it as I can during the months when it is growing abundantly. Although I usually eat it roasted, in ratatouille, or cooked with other vegetables in foil packets over a fire, I had never before combined it with potatoes and corn in a soup. However, when I saw an instant pot variation of this recipe from Brand New Vegan, I knew that I had to try it. I am so glad that I did! This soup is easy to make, inexpensive, and filling. Delicious by itself, it is incredible when topped with the red pepper maple relish. If you do not have an immersion blender, you can also carefully puree the soup in small batches in your blender. Enjoy!

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 4, 2022

14th Annual Adirondack Plein Air Festival set for August 15-20

Saranac Lake ArtWorks, established in 2008 and incorporated as a not-for-profit in 2020, has a mission of using the arts to promote Saranac Lake and the surrounding community. The Plein
Air Festival, scheduled for August 15 – 20, 2022, will bring artists from around the country.

Visitors will have the opportunity to see the Adirondacks through the eyes of these talented painters and have an opportunity to take those memories home with them through their paintings. The Festival kicks off with a free “Meet the Artists” reception on Monday night from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Hotel Saranac, our partner and sponsor of that event.

The completed artworks will be presented for sale beginning Friday, August 19 during the Friday Night Special Preview Party scheduled from 6 to 9 p.m., and at the Show & Sale on Saturday, August 20 from 12 -5 p.m. in the Town Hall. The Show & Sale on Saturday is free and open to the public. Tickets for the Friday Night Special Preview Party are $20 each and may be purchased at the door or online by visiting SaranacLakeArtWorks.org/plein-air .

“Our Plein Air Festival continues to grow more popular each year; despite the challenges that Covid 19 presented in 2020 and 2021. We are excited the event will be in-person as it was last year, bringing artists and visitors to our region from around the country. Our success is a result of the hard work and dedication of ArtWorks members and the overall support of our local art and business community. The event means more than just bringing visitors in for the day. The week-long Festival gives them a reason to stay”, said Sandra Hildreth, President, ArtWorks.

Full details on the event can be found by visiting our website at SaranacLakeArtWorks.org/plein-air

Photo at top: A Plein Air artist. Photo provided by Jane A. Davis Coordinator for Saranac Lake ArtWorks.


Friday, June 3, 2022

Trees for a Changing Climate

My ex-wife gave me a shirt that reads “Change is Good. You Go First” when our divorce was finalised, a much-appreciated bit of humour in the midst of a challenging time. It’s hard to find the mirth in some changes, especially when we don’t have a say in them. Climate change is a good example.

Global temperatures are rising at an ever-increasing rate. Extreme weather events are becoming more frequent and severe with time, and no amount of denial will make it go away. We have to learn to roll with this one. We can’t stop climate change tomorrow, but we can “trick” it by updating the kinds of trees we consider for home and community planting. A warmer world affects trees in a myriad ways: Record wet seasons like in 2013, 2017, and 2019 allow normally weak foliar pathogens to spread and flourish, becoming primary agents of mortality.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, June 3, 2022

DEC mourns Forest Ranger Captain Christopher Kostoss

Christopher Kostoss

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation is mourning the loss of Forest Ranger Captain Christopher Kostoss, who local authorities determined died by suicide on Tuesday. Captain Kostoss, 49, was a 23-year veteran of DEC’s Division of Forest Protection, most recently responsible for overseeing Rangers on patrol in the Adirondack High Peaks.

Captain Kostoss was passionate about protecting public safety and deeply committed to the cause of conservation. He was also a tireless advocate for mental health awareness, particularly among his fellow rangers. His death is a painful reminder of the critical need to promote wellness and destigmatize issues surrounding mental health that prevent individuals from seeking treatment.

If you or someone you know is in need of mental health assistance, please know help is available. The New York State Office of Mental Health has resources on its website (https://omh.ny.gov/omhweb/bootstrap/crisis.html) or you can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK.

The collective heartfelt thoughts of DEC’s close-knit family are with Captain Kostoss’ mother, two daughters, immediate family members and all who loved him. My sincere gratitude to members of the New York State Police and the Lake Placid Police Department for their strong support and professionalism throughout this tragedy.

DEC Forest Ranger Captain Christopher Kostoss. Photo provided by Cayte Bosler


Friday, June 3, 2022

Outdoor Conditions (6/3): Independence River Trail (Otter Creek Horse Trails) in need of repair

outdoor conditions logoThe following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information webpages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

NEW THIS WEEK:

Saranac Lakes Wild Forest: The lock between Middle and Lower Saranac Lakes is now open for public use.

Boreas Ponds Tract: Gulf Brook Road is now open to public motor vehicle traffic as far as the Fly Pond Parking Area.

Independence River Wild Forest (Stillwater Reservoir, Big Moose & Three Lakes Conservation Easement Tracts): The Independence River Trail (Otter Creek Horse Trails) has caved in near two culverts. These areas are marked with flagging, but riders are advised to avoid the Independence River Trail until the trail is fixed.

Pigeon Lake Wilderness: West Mountain and Shallow Lake trails are impassable at Beaver Brook due to beaver activity. Maintenance is scheduled for this summer.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, June 3, 2022

Latest news headlines

Here’s a look at news from around the Adirondacks this week:

» Continue Reading.



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