Monday, June 3, 2019

2,400-Acre Eagle Mountain Preserve Established

Sunset at Copper Pond by Brendan Wiltse PhotographyAn expanse of 2,434 acres of Adirondack foothills at the headwaters of the Boquet River, including streams, ponds, and mature forest, has been protected.

The new Eagle Mountain Wilderness Preserve part of a large, intact forest that connects the High Peaks to lower elevation lands near Lake Champlain. Surrounding protected areas include New York State’s Jay Mountain Wilderness and Taylor Pond Wild Forest (home to the local landmark, Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain), as well as other privately conserved lands.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, June 3, 2019

AuSable Valley Grange Farmers’ Markets Schedules

Adirondack Farm Produce - Photo by Shannon HoulihanThe AuSable Valley Grange producer-only Farmers’ Markets feature fresh no-spray vegetables and herbs; farmstead goat cheese; fresh apples and pears; artisanal cheese and fresh yogurt from grass-fed cows; free-range chicken and egg; grass-fed beef and pork; fresh-baked breads and pastries; ready-to-eat soups, snacks, and beverages; maple syrup; hand-carved bowls and utensils; artwork and crafts. » Continue Reading.


Monday, June 3, 2019

Adirondack Pollinator Symposium Wednesday in North Creek

pollinator symposium 2019AdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project is set to hold a Pollinator Symposium on June 5 at Tannery Pond Community Center, 228 Main Street in North Creek.

The Symposium will be aimed at equipping farmers, groundskeepers, public park managers, gardeners, and local government agencies with the knowledge to help preserve and build crucial pollinator populations in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 2, 2019

40 Years of Per Capita Income Trends in Rural America

The second major economic indicator that was examined in The Adirondack Park and Rural America: Economic and Population Trends 1970-2010 was per capita income.

An analysis of per capita income trends was useful for evaluating differences between regions, especially when analyzed with a range of other economic indicators. Per capita income is the average income earned of a person within a specific geographic area, such as a city, town or state.

When adjusted for inflation, per capita income is an important measurement, though not as good as median household income, because it can be skewed by a few individuals with extremely high incomes in low population areas.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 2, 2019

Protect Adirondack Forests: Use Local Firewood

With the start of camping season underway, Department of Environmental Conservation is reminding campers that the New York State firewood transportation regulation is still in effect.

Untreated firewood may contain invasive pests that kill trees, and to protect New York’s forests, untreated firewood should not be moved more than 50 miles from its source of origin. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, June 2, 2019

Prohibition Stories from the Adirondacks

I’m sure each corner of the Adirondacks has its own stories of bootleggers, moonshine, and the 18th Amendment prohibiting the production, sale, and transportation of alcoholic beverages.

Adirondack Almanack founder John Warren has one in his family. Families in little Beaver River over in Herkimer County, and in Hague and Witherbee have stories, as does about every family that remains from that time.

Each year Chestertown remembers the Prohibition Era with its Rum Runners Weekend and the 3rd Annual Wilmington Historical Society Whiskey Run on June 15th features a speakeasy.

As the centennial of the start of Prohibition approaches, the Adirondack History Museum in Elizabethtown is also showcasing Adirondack stories from the era. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 1, 2019

Welcome Infestations: Dragonflies and Damselflies

dragonfly anatomy courtesy Wikimedia user M A BroussardIt is not too often one hears about a good-news infestation. I’d like to come across a bulletin on a new invasive money-tree that was poised to spread through the region. Granted it would produce in foreign currency, but we could make peace with that situation, I imagine.

A money-tree invasion is unlikely, but some areas will soon be overrun by hordes of insects programmed to eat black flies, mosquitoes and deer flies. Dragonflies and damselflies, carnivorous insects in the order Odonata, date back more than 300 million years. Both kinds of insects are beneficial in that they eat plenty of nasties. Of the estimated 6,000 Odonata species on Earth, about 200 have been identified in our part of the globe. I’ve been told it’s good fortune if one lands on you, but the luck is probably that they terrify biting insects. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 1, 2019

A North Country Man Exposed Racism, Confronted It, and Helped Bring About Change

In the late 1970s, the New York State Human Rights Commissioner was about to find the Plattsburgh Elks Club guilty of violating state laws against racial discrimination. Rather than acquiesce, the club opted for a drastic, self-punishing move: refusing all public rentals of its facilities rather than allow local blacks to rent them. Surrendering their official “public accommodation function” (under state regulations, renting the building or grounds to anyone) was accomplished by adopting a new rule: “The use of the club’s facilities and accommodations shall be granted only to members of the Elks, to sodalities, auxiliaries, and other organizations associated or affiliated with the Elks, and to their guests.” » Continue Reading.


Saturday, June 1, 2019

Poetry: Somehow Changed

Somehow Changed

The woman asleep upstairs in the old summer cabin
awakens to the voice of a psychic Welsh friend
four states away. She hears her name called twice,
the voice pitched low, low and guttural.

The woman peers out the narrow open window
to the left of the fieldstone chimney.
A black bear growls up at her, once, twice.
She recoils from the cheese-cloth-screened window.

Theirs is now the last dwelling on the former dirt road
out of an upstate New York hamlet two miles away.
The steep last 80 yards of their road is still dirt.
The woman will recover sleep but is somehow changed.


Friday, May 31, 2019

Featured Hike: Camp Santanoni Historic Area, Newcomb

camp santanoni mapThe Camp Santanoni Historic Area is a very unique location in the Adirondack Forest Preserve. A surviving great camp, this National Historic Landmark was created in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by Robert C. and Anna Pruyn, serving as a place to entertain guests and find refuge from city life.

Today, the area is a popular day hike destination during summer months, as well as a cross country skiing destination in the colder months. » Continue Reading.


Friday, May 31, 2019

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Friday, May 31, 2019

Adk History Museum Annual Car Show June 8th

adk history museum car showCar collectors and enthusiasts from far and wide will be on hand displaying beautifully restored and maintained muscle cars, vintage roadsters, hot rods and more at the Adirondack History Museum’s 8th Annual Antique and Classic Car Show, on Saturday, June 8th from 11 am to 2 pm.

Admission is free, vintage cars will be exhibited on the museum grounds on Hand Avenue in Elizabethtown. » Continue Reading.


Friday, May 31, 2019

This Week’s Big Adirondack News Stories


Thursday, May 30, 2019

Nine Adirondack Wilderness Rescues Over Six Days

forest ranger logoNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers respond to search and rescue incidents in the Adirondacks. Working with other state agencies, local emergency response organizations and volunteer search and rescue groups, Forest Rangers locate and extract lost, injured or distressed people from the Adirondack backcountry.

What follows is a report, prepared by DEC, of recent missions carried out by Forest Rangers in the Adirondacks. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 30, 2019

Current Adirondack Outdoor Conditions (May 30)

CompassThis weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks is compiled each Thursday afternoon and fully updated by Friday afternoon.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to adkalmanack@gmail.com.

Learn and practice the seven Leave No Trace principles. Carry out what you have carried in. Do not leave gear, food, or other items at lean-tos and campsites. Do not litter. Take the free online Leave No Trace course here.

BE PREPARED! Start slow, gain experience. Carry proper safety equipment and weather protection and bring plenty of water, lights and a map. When on the trail: keep the group together, watch the time, and be prepared to turn back. Accidents happen to the most experienced people. Be prepared to spend an unplanned night in the woods in freezing temperatures. Always carry food, a space blanket, emergency whistle, first aid kit, fire making tools, extra clothing layers and socks, and a map and compass. Inform someone of your itinerary and before entering the backcountry or launching a boat check the National Weather Service watches, warnings, and advisories here. Follow Adirondack weather forecasts at Burlington and Albany and consult the High Elevation, Recreation, or Lake Champlain forecasts.

May 30th, 2019 – SPECIAL NOTICES » Continue Reading.