Sunday, May 3, 2020

Call for entries: 47th Annual Tupper Lake Art Show

The Tupper Art Center  is currently closed for now due to the quarantine and it’s possible they may delay the opening of the following events or opt for a virtual format. Regardless, they are preparing for a number of events to be happening soon over the coming months:.

They are currently calling for artists for their 47th annual Tupper Lake Art Show, to take place at 106 Park St, Tupper Lake, on June 17 – July 11. Artists may submit up to 4 hanging works of art per individual, of any medium. Tables are available for 3 dimensional projects and floor space will be available for larger works of art. The drop-off is Saturday June 13 and Sunday June 14 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The reception is Wednesday, June 17, 6 to 8 p.m., and the pick-up will be  July 12-13. To learn more about the art show and to find forms to enter, just visit this link.

There will also be an Adirondacks Woodcrafts Show from July 14 – July 30, with the opening reception being on July 14 from 5 – 7 p.m. For more information you can contact info@tupperarts.org


Sunday, May 3, 2020

The Adirondacks Around The Web This Week


Saturday, May 2, 2020

History of Arab Mountain – Beyond the Fire Tower

Arab Mountain (or, more often, Mount Arab) is a 2,539-foot peak located in the Town of Piercefield in St. Lawrence County, almost five miles west of Tupper Lake and nine miles east of Cranberry Lake.
The hike to the summit is relatively easy and short (a two mile round-trip), and one can climb the steel, 35-foot Aermotor fire tower (built in 1918) and enjoy the beautiful panorama of the Adirondacks from the cab. Just across from the fire tower is the old observer’s cabin which has been restored and turned into a museum. The museum, established by the Friends of Mt Arab (FoMA), contains a wealth of information on the use of Arab Mountain for fire observation. The cabin is open when the summit steward is on duty, from the late spring to early fall. In regard to peak-bagging challenges, it is part of the Fire Tower Challenge and the Tupper Lake Triad. (Editor’s note, fire towers are currently closed due to COVID-19, and the Fire Tower Challenge is temporarily suspended
Much of the history given here is prior to Arab Mountain being established for fire observation in 1911. I delve into the history of its name, appearance on nineteenth-century maps, and use in early surveys. I also briefly discuss a nearby peak that is virtually unheard of and is unmapped: Gull Pond Mountain.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 2, 2020

Lawson and Clint Allen Scholarship Accepting Applicants

The Essex Community Fund at Adirondack Foundation announced the “Lawson and Clint Allen Scholarship and Educational Program Fund” is now accepting applications for graduating high school seniors within Essex and Willsboro. Eligable applications will be enrolled in public, private, or home schools with plans to attend post-secondary education at a 2 or 4 year college, or through trade certification.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 2, 2020

From the Archive: Infamous Murder Revisited

Murder in the Adirondacks bookFrom 2017: Betsy Kepes reviews an updated edition of Craig Brandon’s classic 1986 book “Murder in the Adirondacks.” Over 100 years ago, the Chester Gillette Grace Brown murder case was considered the trial of the century. The case became the basis for Theodore Dreiser’s classic novel “An American Tragedy” and the movie “A Place in the Sun,” starring Montgomery Clift and Elizabeth Taylor. Brandon’s book revisits the tragedy at Big Moose Lake and the ensuing trial.

According to Kepes, when North Country Books asked Brandon if he’d be interested in writing a revised edition, he jumped at the chance.

Read more here: https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2017/04/infamous-murder-in-adirondacks-revisited.html

 

One year ago: Peter Bauer looks at 40 Years of Household Income Trends in Rural America

Five years ago: Dan Crane discovers illegal trails in the Five Ponds, Pepperbox Wilderness Areas:  https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2015/05/illegal-trail-straddles-five-ponds-pepperbox-wilderness.html

 

Stay informed about news and information about the Adirondacks by signing up for the Almanack’s daily news digest: https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/sign-email-updates

 


Saturday, May 2, 2020

May brings more fishing opportunities

Starting today (Saturday, May 2), it’s open season for cool water fish like walleye, northern pike, pickerel, and the tiger muskellunge.

Historically, walleye only inhabited waters in the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence River, and Allegheny River watersheds in New York. Today, primarily due to stocking and other DEC management efforts, walleye occur in more than 140 waters from all of the major watersheds of the state.

Visit the DEC’s website here to find prime fishing locations, and check out the feature article “Prized ‘Eyes,” in DEC’s Freshwater Fishing Digest, where the DEC reveals how they manage walleye,  and where to catch them.

Kristyn Hanna proudly holds a walleye she caught from Oneida Lake in February 2019. DEC photo


Friday, May 1, 2020

Quarantine reads: More recommended Adirondack reading

Thanks to all who responded to our call for recommended Adirondack, environmental and nature-themed reading to pass the time in COVID-19 quarantine.

Here’s the original post

We also reached out to a handful of Almanack contributors to ask for their input and here’s some additional suggestions to add to the list:

» Continue Reading.


Friday, May 1, 2020

Sembrich cancels summer music festival

The Sembrich — a cultural center in Bolton Landing that honors international opera singer Marcella Sembrich at her former teaching studio — has announced the cancellation of its season, 20/20: Musical Visionaries.

sembrichAn announcement from the nonprofit was posted today: “Although we lament not being able to present our planned summer festival this year, we will be focusing on ways to be helpful to you during this difficult time. New, unique online content will be developed for our website, TheSembrich.org, which we hope you will visit often and find engaging. We are also increasing our activity through social media, including Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Please consider following us to receive updates regarding our activities.

Pending permission from the appropriate governmental authorities, we hope to open our grounds to the community for peaceful walks with appropriate social distancing. We will continue to follow all CDC, state, and local guidelines for safety. It is currently unknown whether or not we will open the museum in 2020.”

Editor’s note: Check out our list of closings at https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2020/04/covid-19-related-closings-and-delays-in-the-adirondacks.html. Send cancellation announcements to editor@adirondackalmanack.com


Friday, May 1, 2020

Birding in Socially Distant Times

American OspreyFrom the Lake Placid Land Conservancy:
Have you ever stepped outside and wondered what bird just flew by or is chirping at you from a tree overhead? Perhaps you’re looking for a new way to spend more time outside or a fun activity to do while social distancing? Birding is a perfect activity to do while hiking locally and spring is an especially wonderful time to start!

Bird activity is on the rise in April and May, as many species migrate to their summer habitats either in the Adirondacks or to points north. In our neck of the woods, we excitedly anticipate seeing the silhouette of common loons on the chilly lakes. The loons are noisily welcomed by the distinctive calls of Red-winged Blackbirds and osprey along with the lovely, melodic songs of Lincoln’s Sparrows, Palm Warblers, and Ruby-crowned Kinglets, to name a few.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, May 1, 2020

Green Amendment Webinar Series

Adirondack Mountain Club PhotoIn 2019, New York Legislators passed a proposed amendment to the New York State Constitution, acknowledging that clean air, water, and a healthy environment are a fundamental right. The passage of bill S 2072/A 2064 was the first step in making this Green Amendment into law, and upon a successful passage come 2021, the citizens of New York will have the opportunity to vote on it.
This coming May, Cathy Pedler of the Adirondack Mountain Club, partnered with Environmental Advocates of New York and Green Amendments for The Generations, are hosting a free 3-part webinar series covering the Green Amendment.

Click the following links to register:

» Continue Reading.


Friday, May 1, 2020

This Week’s Big Adirondack News Stories


Thursday, April 30, 2020

Adirondack Outdoor Conditions (4/30): Look for trails less taken

This weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks sent out from the NYS DEC.

General Conditions

  • HIKE SMART NY by always being prepared for your trip, variable trail conditions, and unexpected weather when you go out on the trail.
  • Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics has recommendations for responsible outdoor recreation (leaves DEC website) during the COVID-19 public health crisis.
  • Town of Keene now prohibits non-residents from parking on Johns Brook, Market, and Adirondack Streets in Keene Valley during the COVID-19 public health crisis. Violators will be towed.
  • Issuance of backcountry camping permits for groups of 10 or more, and for more than 3 days at one location is temporarily suspended due to the COVID-19 public health crisis.
  • DEC’s Lake Flower Boat Launch in Saranac Lake is closed to trailered boats due to construction at the site.
  • Adirondack Mountain Reserve (aka Ausable Club) is immediately reducing the parking capacity on its lot near the intersection of Ausable Road and State Route 73 to a maximum of 28 vehicles in response to COVID-19. Parking is not permitted along Ausable Road, on Ausable Club lands, or along the nearby stretches of State Route 73.
  • Adirondack Mountain Club’s High Peaks Information Center will remain closed through May 14 in response to COVID-19. Parking at Adirondak Loj Trailhead remains open to the public for a fee. The restrooms on the back porch of the High Peaks Information Center are also open.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 30, 2020

Free online composting workshops

New York State’s Organics Summit’s three sessions have transitioned to free online webinars that all are welcome to join. You can click here to learn more about the webinar, as well as to register.

The webinars are as follows:

  • May 4: Bringing Food Scraps Drop-Off Programs To Your Community
  • May 7: Incorporating Food Scraps into your Yard Waste Composting Facility
  • May 19: Managing Wasted Food: Lessons Learned Nationally and New York State’s Plan of Action

After the May 4 and the May 7 seminars, speakers and other attendees will participate in a 30-minute facilitated discussion in order to elaborate on points, answer questions more in depth, and to network and share resources.

 


Thursday, April 30, 2020

Ticks: Not a fan of social distancing

tick next to dimeGetting fresh air is more important than ever this coming summer during the public health crises, but it would be wise to remember that both ticks and people are going to be active and outside. Laura Harrington, a professor of entomology, vector biologist, and Director of the CDC Northeast Regional Center for Excellence in Vector Borne Diseases (NEVBD) has shared some tips on how to avoid ticks.

A bacterial infection that causes Lyme disease is the most important tick-borne human infection in the U.S., with around 200,000-300,000 reported cases per year. The blacklegged tick or ‘deer tick’ is the vector of Lyme disease in most of the U.S. It can also transmit other pathogens to people and pets, including the agents that cause babesiosis, anaplasmosis and Powassan disease. Blacklegged ticks are most common in forested areas and shaded trail edges with abundant leaf litter and shrubby plants, Harrington says.

Harrington recommends a few personal protection measures to keep ticks from biting, such as tick repellent, first and foremost. She also recommends light-colored clothing, and to tuck your pantlegs into your socks. It also wouldn’t hurt to treat your clothing with permethrin, or to purchase permethrin-treated clothing. Remember to check yourself for ticks often as well, both while hiking and after you get home! It only takes 24-48 hours after the tick attaches before it can begin to transmit Lyme disease. For other pathogens like the Powassan virus, transmission can happen quickly, so it is good to check as often as possible.

Check for ticks all over your body, including your back, neck, and hairline. If you happen to find a tick, carefully remove it with sharp tweezers by grasping as close to the point of attachment as possible and pulling. Once you are back inside, place your clothes in the dryer for at least 20 minutes, and take a shower (a good place to perform a tick check). You can also place your clothes in a sealed garbage bag to dry later.


Wednesday, April 29, 2020

Internet Access – What it is like to be in an underserved area 

Lorraine DuvallThe New York Broadband Program recently announced the Phase 3 award of $389 million for “public/private broadband investment, covering 134,757 homes and other locations across the State. This represents the third and final phase of the Program, and the successful completion of the historic effort to connect all New Yorkers to high-speed Internet.”  Some New York residents beyond the reach of cable or fiber options are offered two service plans to provide satellite internet service from HughesNet. The least expensive is $60 per month for a 20 Gigabyte Plan and $130 per month for a 100 Gigabyte Plan, with bonus data for off-hours. Both plans include 25 Megabit-per second download speeds, and 3 Megabits upload speeds.  

At our house in Keene (in the 5% in the town that is not serviced by broadband), we are now paying $70 a month to HughesNet for the capability that is included in this Phase 3 award for $60 per month.  This is hardly adequate in normal times, but certainly not now during this pandemic. It’s easy to use up 20 Gigabytes halfway through the month with increased video conferencing and the need for uploading data to communicate with the outside world, to supplement social distancing. Our download speeds are then reduced significantly to 2 Mbps, down from 25Mbps. To give HughesNet some credit, during this pandemic they have been increasing their download speeds from 25 Mbps to 40-50 Mbps, which allows adequate streaming with the result of using up the data bytes faster. They give away what they call free tokens for increasing the data allocation. These don’t last long.

» Continue Reading.