Sunday, December 20, 2020

Uncovering the mysteries behind a bridge’s remains

The First Suspension Bridge to Cross the Hudson River – 1871

Eight or ten years ago, when some of the last of the Finch-Pruyn lands were transferred from the Nature Conservancy to the State of New York, my wife and I hiked into Palmer Pond and then bushwhacked down to the Hudson River on the last of their logging roads.  Almost at the edge of the riverbank there was a log-header and just behind he the header was what appeared to be the remains of an old roadway.  We followed the overgrown roadway for approximately a quarter of a mile.  We then turned around, not knowing if we had inadvertently hiked on to private lands.  However that memory of the roadway lingered in my mind.  Where did it go ??

A few years later a friend and I were paddling the Hudson River from Riparius to the Glen and after paddling through “Z rapids” and “Horse Race Rapids” we stopped to rest at the Washburn’s Eddy.  There, my friend pointed out (river left) two iron cables that reached down the rock face and entered the water.  What was this ?   My friend told me that it was the remains of a bridge that had one time crossed the Hudson River.

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Sunday, December 20, 2020

12 months of Almanack: January story highlights

Starting today, we’ll count down the year, looking back month by month at the most popular stories that ran in the Almanack. 

We’ll start with the top five from January:

  1. SAVE THE RAILS: Guest essay about preserving our rail infrastructure. https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2020/01/viewpoint-tearing-out-railroads-is-not-progress.html
  2. MAKE SOME TRAILS: On the other side of “rails vs. trails” is Peter Bauer, in a commentary about the Hudson River line from North Creek to Saratoga. https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2020/01/viewpoint-convert-hudson-river-rails-to-multi-use-trai.html
  3. HISTORIC RESCUE: Forest Ranger Scott van Laer looks back on a memorable incident on Algonquin. https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2020/01/on-algonquin-in-winter-bad-luck-can-be-fatal.html
  4. DIVERSITY GOALS: Area museums receive grant funds to advance their work in meeting the needs of all visitors. https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2020/01/adkx-wild-center-working-on-diversity.html
  5. HIGH PEAKS CROWDS: Adirondack Council Executive Director Willie Janeway shared an update about patterns of use in the High Peaks Wilderness. https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2020/01/early-results-on-overuse-visitors-still-surging.html

Sunday, December 20, 2020

Weekly news roundup

A round up of interesting reads:

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Saturday, December 19, 2020

Top stories of 2020

woolly bearAs of mid-December, we’ve published 1,354 stories, commentaries, news releases and other posts. That’s pretty impressive, especially when you also consider the 425 stories that were posted to our sister site Adirondack Explorer (.org) in 2020, in addition to 40 photo galleries and 25 videos to the Explorer’s YouTube channel.

Almanack top 10

Here are the Adirondack Almanack’s 10 most-read stories from 2020 (taken from Google Analytics):

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Saturday, December 19, 2020

Adirondack history website brings museums, orgs together in one place

To say that John Sasso is passionate about Adirondack history would be an understatement.

He’s the founder of the History and Legends of the Adirondacks group on Facebook, which launched five years ago and has since grown to almost 21,000 members. In that forum, Sasso frequently posts his own research into the history of different peaks and the areas that surround them. Some of those historic peak profiles have been published here as well. Click here to see John’s work on the Almanack.

On top of all that, John has been quietly working behind the scenes on a personal project: An interactive map of historical organizations, museums and related landmarks.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, December 19, 2020

Holiday recycling tips

Recycling Bin “Do’s” and “Don’ts” – Holiday Edition

NYS DEC provides some important recycling tips so you can have a waste-free seasonal celebration! Check out all the following tips and information, as well as events offered this season in order to help spread information and reduce waste this season.

Holiday Recycling Tips
  • Cardboard Boxes: Do recycle! Flatten boxes to save space and remove loose tape.
  • Holiday Cards: Do not include cards with glittery, metallic, or foil elements. Do include all others.
  • Wrapping Paper: Do not include metallic, glittery, or foil-lined papers. Do include other wrapping papers by folding into flat sheets before recycling.

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Friday, December 18, 2020

Adirondack Communities: Developing Support Networks for an Aging Population 

The Adirondack population is rapidly getting older. By 2030, according to projections from the New  York State Office for the Aging, more than one third of the population in most North Country counties will be over the age of 60. New York State itself ranks fourth in the nation in the number of adults over 60. And state-wide the fastest growing population is over 85. For the remote towns and villages of the Adirondack region, this represents a challenge and an opportunity. 

» Continue Reading.


Friday, December 18, 2020

Outdoor Conditions (12/18): Snow is here

The following are the most recent notices pertaining to public lands in the Adirondacks. Please check the Adirondack Backcountry Information web pages for comprehensive and up-to-date information on seasonal road statuses, rock climbing closures, specific trail conditions, and other pertinent information.

NEW:

Essex Chain Lakes Complex: All publicly drivable roads in the Essex Chain Complex are now closed for the winter season.

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Friday, December 18, 2020

Latest News Headlines


Thursday, December 17, 2020

Mount Marcy: The Name, The Climb, The Legacy

The first known ascent of Mount Marcy occurred on August 5, 1837 when a team of New York State Geologists, led by Ebenezer Emmons, spent a glorious five hours on top of the peak.

But it was not Emmons that best described what his team saw that day. Instead, it was his intrepid guide, John Cheney, that historians most often quote. Looking out over the vast range of mountains and lakes below them, Cheney observed, “It makes a man feel what it is to have all creation placed beneath his feet.” What Emmons did make note of on that brilliant August day was the presence of ice patches up to a half-inch thick scattered about the summit. Still, the lead geologist for the New York State Survey could not comprehend the existence of huge boulders, or erratics, that were left behind by glaciers. Emmons thought at the time that they were there as a result of a biblical-type flood.

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Thursday, December 17, 2020

Wild lights, wild nights at the Wild Center

Throughout the winter weekends on Friday and Saturday evenings, the Wild Center is hosting Wild Lights, presented by Merrill L. Thomas, Inc., a dazzling display that transforms the campus into a winter wonderland. he Wild Center, which will remain open throughout the winter season, will also offer familiar activities, such as Winter Wild Walk and snowshoeing, as well as new ones like kicksledding and the outdoor winter otter play yard.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, December 17, 2020

Where to see holiday lights in the Adirondacks

Let’s face it, there’s not much going on for events this holiday season. So every more reason to head out for a drive to check out some socially distance lights displays.

Here are a few taking place around the Adirondack region:

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Thursday, December 17, 2020

DEC announces grants to land trusts

Awards to North Country, Capital Region organizations total $1M

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos recently announced more than $2.2 million in Conservation Partnership Program grants for 50 not-for-profit land trusts across the state.

A total of 69 grants funded through New York’s Environmental Protection Fund will leverage an additional $2.6 million in private and local funding to support projects that protect water quality and farmland, boost public access for outdoor recreation, and conserve open space to benefit community health, tourism, and economic development. The Land Trust Alliance administers the Conservation Partnership Program in coordination with DEC.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, December 16, 2020

Things Fall Apart At The Adirondack Park Agency

The Adirondack Park Agency (APA) was rocked last week with the sudden resignation of Chad Dawson, who served as one of three APA Board members from outside the Adirondack Park Blue Line. Dawson is a Professor Emeritus at SUNY ESF, who not literally, but actually, wrote the book on the management of Wilderness and public lands. See Wilderness Management: Stewardship and Protection of Resources and Values (4th edition). Though Dawson was an authority on public lands management and is recognized widely across the U.S. as an expert, few at the APA and the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) would listen to him.

Dawson took words on paper seriously, especially the words of the APA Act and Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan. One such case was where the Master Plan calls for carrying capacity studies on public water bodies during the development of Unit Management Plans (UMPs), a clause that the DEC has long refused to acknowledge and fulfill. The APA has never tried to uphold this requirement. At deliberations over UMPs in the last four years, Dawson would point to this section of the Master Plan and he would be met with yawns from other APA Board members that the APA has never asked for these studies before, so why start now.

» Continue Reading.


Wednesday, December 16, 2020

Chad Dawson resigns from the APA

Last week’s Adirondack Park Agency meeting was a humdinger.

Board members, state Department of Environmental Conservation staff and APA staff all discussed two major projects that have led to plenty of passionate public comment. Those included visions for the Debar Mountain Complex and some changes to the Essex Chain Lakes area.

About three hours into this meeting, with the above-mentioned projects taking up the majority of the time, board member Chad Dawson announced his resignation. Dawson (pictured here) has been a wilderness advocate on the board, whose membership leans toward local government and economic development.

» Continue Reading.



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