Wednesday, December 16, 2020

Hamilton County hunter injured from falling out of tree stand

tree standRecent NYS DEC Forest Ranger actions:

Town of Arietta
Hamilton County
Wilderness Rescue:
 On Dec. 12 at 11:25 a.m., DEC’s Ray Brook Dispatch was notified via radio by Forest Ranger Milano about a 60-year-old hunter from Long Lake who had fallen out of a tree stand. While on routine patrol in Sargent Ponds Wilderness Area, Ranger Milano noticed a truck parked at the end of North Point Road and saw an injured man crouched next to his vehicle waving frantically. The Forest Ranger had recently transferred into the Long Lake area and was in the right place at the right time — North Point Road is a dead-end road with no cell phone coverage and the hunter had not informed anyone he was going into the woods. Ranger Milano called dispatch to request an ambulance and administered medical care while waiting for the Long Lake Rescue Squad. Once the ambulance arrived, the hunter was transported to a local hospital for additional medical care. DEC’s Environmental Conservation Police Officer (ECO) Buswell and Bureau of Environmental Crimes Investigators (BECI) Unit were notified to investigate as a possible elevated hunting incident.

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Wednesday, December 16, 2020

Howl Story Slam returns live online

The Howl Story Slam is back with an evening of live stories told online. The team behind the Howl has worked to revamp the program as it is so important to hold space for stories in a time when we can’t physically be together. The beloved program will take place virtually for everyone to enjoy from home on December 18, 2020 at 7:00pm

Anyone is welcome to tell a true, five-minute story on the theme “Holidays: The good, the bad, the ugly” using no notes.

The first 15 storytellers to sign up will be included in the lineup. Registration required for storytellers and audience members, sign up here bit.ly/decvirtualhowl. Free to tell stories and to attend.

The Howl Story Slam team is a partnership between Adirondack Center for Writing and North Country Public Radio, two organizations that believe in the power of stories.

Gretchen Koehler tells a story at the Howl Grand Story Slam, December 2019. Photo credit: Baylee Annis, Adirondack Center for Writing


Tuesday, December 15, 2020

Coming home to play

“Oh, how cute!”

That was our first impression on seeing the little piano in Linda Kaiser’s basement in Syracuse.

Then we tried to carry it up a flight of stairs.

Linda had called Great Camp Sagamore’s executive director, Emily Martz, to donate the piano that she and her husband Harvey bought at an auction on Sagamore’s Main Lodge lawn in October 1975.

The piano has only 61 keys – the standard is 88. Margaret Emerson probably bought it for her children to play at Sagamore. Her grandson, Alfred Vanderbilt III, remembers playing a piano with “a strange number of keys” when he would visit camp as a young child.

Linda’s generosity reminds us of the extraordinary confluence of institutions, individuals, and events that surrounded that fall weekend in 1975.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2020

“Why I Hunt” and “Why I Trap” Photo & Essay Contest

The NYS DEC is calling for hunters and trappers to submit photos and essays about what motivates them to trek out into the wilderness and practice what they love. Whether it be a family tradition, a connection to nature, or just to feed your family, the DEC is asking for the people of New York to share their stories so that they may encourage others to get outside and do the same. The winners of the contest will appear in the 2021-2022 New York Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide, which has over half a million readers.

Essays should be non-fiction, original material told from a first-person perspective, of 50 to 500 words in length. The contest has a limit of one entry per person with a maximum of two photos per entry. Photos must be taken in New York State.

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Tuesday, December 15, 2020

Paul Smith’s readies 5K trail network for Nordic, Biathlon competitions

Paul Smith’s College, working in conjunction with USA Nordic and US Biathlon, is in the position to have its new five-kilometer Nordic Trail network approved by the International Ski Federation FIS and the International Biathlon Union IBU for elite level racing.

Once the project is completed, Paul Smith’s will be the sole collegiate facility in the US with sanctioned trails for Nordic Skiing and a biathlon range on campus. This will set Paul Smith’s College on route towards its goal of becoming the top Nordic and biathlon school in the country.

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Monday, December 14, 2020

Adirondack communities: Fixing food insecurity, child care gaps

The Adirondack Explorer/Adirondack Almanack is partnering with Adirondack Foundation to shine a light on unmet needs in the region as well as highlight promising efforts to address them. This special series was inspired by the Foundation’s 2019 report “Meeting the Needs of Adirondack Communities.”  To learn more, visit adirondackfoundation.org/meeting-needs-adirondack-communities.

In our previous post, we gave an overview of some of the struggles working families face — finding child care and access to fresh, healthy food options. look at organizations that are working to address the problems that working families face.

Here, we’ll highlight some new ways organizations are addressing the needs of working families. 

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Monday, December 14, 2020

NYS Historic Preservation Board nominates 2 North Country assets

The New York State Board for Historic Preservation has recommended 16 varied properties across NYS to the State and National Registers of Historic Places, two of which are located within the North Country Region.

Previous additions to the registry have included things like African American burial grounds, industrialist Andrew Carnegie’s legacy of New York Libraries, a Hudson Valley gold club established to counter anti-Semitism, and more historically significant locations.

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Monday, December 14, 2020

Unmute yourself: Writing workshops for teens

A new series of workshops is launching from the Adirondack Center for Writing, designed for teens by professional performance poets and educators. The workshops are online and are open to all teen writers and a great extracurricular for college apps.

There is no cost to attend. Students can join for one or all of the workshops for the best experience. Registration is required at bit.ly/acwunmute and Zoom link sent via email after registration. Follow @adkctr4writing for updates.

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Sunday, December 13, 2020

Stink, squash and seed bugs: Uninvited pests

According to northern New York homeowners, there are three bug species that refuse to follow the social distancing guidelines. Six-legged interlopers are occupying residences and gardens en masse this holiday season. The purpose of this article is to describe the bugs, and discuss control strategies for each insect. 

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Sunday, December 13, 2020

Send us your story ideas

As we round the bend into 2021, we’d like to hear from you. What kinds of stories would you like to see more of? Is there something happening in your community we should know about?

Send your thoughts and feedback to [email protected].


Sunday, December 13, 2020

Pendragon Theatre takes an Intermission

Over the past year, The Pendragon Theatre has done its best to adapt to circumstance in providing a large array of virtual and physical content like The Pendragon Play, acting and playwriting classes for adults and children, the Young Playwrights Festival, a veterans improvisation PTSD therapy program with St. Joseph’s Rehabilitation Center, puppet workshops, a partnership with Adirondack Experience (ADKX) the Winter Carnival show – Life, Love & Legends, and work on their new building project on Woodruff street. However, with the quarantine in place and with the lack of a live audience, there is only so much a theatre can do.


Sunday, December 13, 2020

Weekly News Roundup


Saturday, December 12, 2020

Under the mistletoe

What is Mistletoe? 

A mistletoe is a flowering plant (angiosperm) which, although capable of growing independently, is almost always parasitic or, more specifically, partially or hemi-parasitic. Mistletoes grow on the branches of host trees and shrubs, sending out roots that tap into their hosts’ vascular systems, which they then rely on for uptake of water, mineral nutrients and, to some extent, carbohydrates. It’s interesting to note that the word mistletoe translates from its Anglo-Saxon origin as dung on a twig; derived from the ancient belief that the plants grew from bird droppings. Actually, they grow from seeds found in the bird droppings.

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Saturday, December 12, 2020

Make it: Skillet Cornbread

Skillet Cornbread


This old-fashioned recipe for skillet cornbread is simple, easy, and produces a delicious cornbread that has a perfectly buttery crust on the bottom.

Ingredients:

  • ½ stick butter
  • 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 ½ cups cornmeal
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 ½ cup milk
  • 10-inch cast iron skillet

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Saturday, December 12, 2020

More to explore: Extra footage

 

 

Adirondack Explorer readers who occasionally click on stories that include one of our videos may be unaware that there’s much more where that came from.

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