Thursday, April 14, 2022

NYS DEC announces proposed changes to wild turkey hunting regulations

wild turkey - male

On April 6, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced proposed changes to wild turkey hunting regulations, giving hunters additional turkey hunting opportunities. The proposal, if enacted, would not be in place until later this year and among other changes, establishes a spring turkey season in Suffolk County in 2023, with a season limit of one bearded bird.

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Thursday, April 14, 2022

Pride and Prejudice performance set for April 30, May 1 in Keene Valley

It’s not every day that Keene Valley hosts Actors Equity Association (AEA) actors, but thanks to East Branch Friends of the Arts (EBFA), three members of the union for professional stage artists will take center stage at the Keene Valley Congregational Church on Saturday, April 30 at 7 p.m and Sunday, May 1 at 3 p.m.
 
For Sam Balzac it is a return to his roots: he began his school days at Keene Central School (KCS) as a kindergartener and graduated from the high school in 2013.  In addition to the many school productions he performed in, as a child he also performed in several shows in the church where this program will be held.
 
This production is one that Balzac took a hand in creating with his mother, Kathleen Recchia, more than a decade ago–a musical adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic novel “Pride and Prejudice.” The second workshopped production was presented by the Book & Blanket Players youth theatre program last summer. The vocal tracks had been recorded for the students by Balzac and Hannah Eakin, a NYC-based actor who is also a member of AEA.

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Kid next to water
Wednesday, April 13, 2022

Scouting out potential future mountain biking adventures

wilmington

It was January, and the snow was crusty and slick but not deep, not the sort of base you would want to ride a mountain bike on — so of course that’s exactly what someone had done at Otis Mountain where we were doing a little hiking on an excellent trail network that in summer will be filled with cyclists.

He had ridden across the famed Otis Mountain waterfall, which was frozen solid up top with a precipitous drop as reward for an untimely slip, and he (it had to be a he, right?) had ridden up and down some gawdawful slopes with attendant slides and spinouts evident by his track.

It reminded me of a Lollapalooza I had attended (long story, not worth it) where I saw a bruised and blood-drenched kid staggering out of the mosh pit and heard one of his friends gush, “Wow, you must have really been having fun.”

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Wednesday, April 13, 2022

Rangers locate lost hiker on Cat, Thomas mountains

forest ranger reportTown of Bolton
Warren County
Wilderness Rescue:
 On April 10 at 8:15 p.m., Warren County 911 requested Forest Ranger assistance regarding a group hiking Cat and Thomas mountains. One of the members got separated and called for help. Ranger Kabrehl responded to the coordinates provided by 911 and located the subject approximately one-half mile from the Edgecomb Pond trailhead. Ranger Kabrehl assisted the 18-year-old from the Bronx to the trailhead where the subject was taken by ambulance to the hospital. Resources were clear at 11:30 p.m.

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Wednesday, April 13, 2022

Adirondack Watershed Institute’s research lab receives state certification

The Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute (AWI) recently announced that the New York State Department of Health awarded it certification through the Environmental Laboratory Approval Program (ELAP).

The AWI Environmental Research Lab is a state-of-the-art laboratory specifically designed for the analysis of surface and ground water in the Adirondack region. The laboratory saw major upgrades in 2010 when Paul Smith’s College built the Countess Alicia Spaulding-Paolozzi Environmental Science and Education Center.

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Tuesday, April 12, 2022

Hooper Mine as Winter Wanes

hooper mine

Story and photos by Dan Forbush

If you’re looking for a short, scenic hike you can do with the kids, you can’t beat the Hooper Garnet Mine. Even better if you have a keen interest in Adirondack history, given the substantial role that the mining of garnet has played in it.

To get there, drive first to Garnet Hill Lodge in North River, and check in with the receptionist, who will even give you a map if you ask for one. You’ll be advised to drive a half-mile or so back down the road and take the first significant left. You’ll ultimately come to a lodge-like building and tennis courts to your right. The trail to Hooper Mine begins to the left of the courts as you walk toward them. It’s well-marked. You can’t miss it so long as you get to those courts.

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Tuesday, April 12, 2022

Poem: Awaiting The Rain

Awaiting the Rain
Green Adirondack chairs,

Bleached by sun, arms touching,

Commiserate, await, relief for parched planks.

Trees sway, dip and bend in ancient dance,

Nature’s Code Talkers, communicating warning

To all who listen and see.

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Tuesday, April 12, 2022

APA, Gov. recognize former chief Terry Martino

barbara rice and terry martino

In recognition of Terry Martino’s career as executive director of the Adirondack Park Agency, at her last APA board meeting before retiring, Martino was presented with a citation from Gov. Kathy Hochul, and the board passed the following resolution:

Whereas: On August 12, 2009, the Adirondack Park Agency Board appointed Terry Martino as Executive  Director of the Adirondack Park Agency. For the next twelve and a half years, Executive Director Martino led  the Park Agency with dignity, respect, and fundamental fairness until her retirement on February 22, 2022; and  

Whereas: Terry Martino’s exceptional background was deeply rooted in decades of Adirondack environmental  stewardship and smart growth accomplishments. Prior to her appointment to the Park Agency, she  successfully advocated for the North Country as the Executive Director of the Adirondack North Country  Association; and  

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Monday, April 11, 2022

Adirondack Lake Survey Corp Explores Merger with Ausable River Association

adirondack lake survey merger with Ausable River Association

The governing boards of the Adirondack Lake Survey Corporation and the Ausable River Association have announced plans for a merger. The merger would advance their shared goal of deploying critical field and laboratory science in the Adirondack Park to inform the protection of waterways, lands, and air for the benefit of all stakeholders.

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Monday, April 11, 2022

NYS DEC issues guidance to reduce conflicts with bears

On April 5, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) reminded New Yorkers to take down bird feeders and secure garbage to avoid potential conflicts with black bears.

Bears are emerging from their dens, and now is the time to take steps to reduce potential conflicts throughout the spring and summer. Bird feeders, unsecured garbage, and outdoor pet and livestock feed can attract bears and lead to potential conflicts for homeowners. Repeated access to bird feeders and garbage can make bears bolder, seeking additional sources of human-related foods inside vehicles or buildings, particularly when natural foods are scarce.

Feeding bears intentionally is illegal. Unintentional feeding through bird feeders and unsecured garbage also has consequences for communities and may ultimately be deadly for the bear if the bear becomes a greater threat to people and property after exposure to these sources of food. It is important to properly manage attractants to avoid human-bear conflicts.

The DEC advises everyone residing in or visiting bear country (most of upstate New York) to remove any attractants. People should take down bird feeders and clean up any remaining bird seed now, begin storing garbage inside secure buildings until the morning of collection, and feed pets indoors. By taking these simple steps, New Yorkers can help ensure bears will find food naturally, which protects people, property, and bears.

For more information, please visit DEC’s webpage on reducing human-bear conflicts.

An interview with DEC Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Hurst discussing ways to avoid human-bear conflicts and a video of a bear destroying a bird feeder can be found on the DEC’s website, interview/video coverage courtesy of the NYS DEC.

Photo at top: Black bear in Raquette Lake. Photo by Jeff Nadler, archive photo. 

 

 


Monday, April 11, 2022

Loons cry out

loons on a lake

When I was camping a couple of summers ago at Sampson Lake in West Canada Lake Wilderness, all was silent in the dark night but the unforgettable calls of a pair of a loons.

Even someone with a tin ear for bird calls knew what they were hearing. It felt as if it was just me and the loons on that lake – maybe in the entire world. Visitors and residents of the Adirondacks have experienced that feeling of connectedness since time immemorial.

But just like so many other things, a warming climate presents new threats to the iconic species. The Explorer’s new climate change reporter Cayte Bosler examined how climate change may threaten loons in the coming years. From “molt-migration mismatch” that makes loons vulnerable to getting iced-in to torrential rain increasing lake levels, conservationists are working to respond to a variety of risks.

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Sunday, April 10, 2022

It’s Time To Work Out Cathead Mountain Amendment

Hamilton County has been trying to expand its emergency communications network for years. The county has dead spots for not only cell service but for its emergency communications system too, especially in the southern part of the county. The only viable option for the county, given the widely and most commonly used emergency communications equipment in New York State, is to expand its network of line-of-sight towers powered through utility lines, with emergency backups, and are accessible by motor vehicle for servicing. The south end of Hamilton County has limited police and EMT communications service.

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Sunday, April 10, 2022

Discussion time: Climate coverage

youth climate rally

One of our most talked about contributions in recent weeks is this piece by Paul Hetzler. In it, he writes about climate change and debunking the “CO2 fertilization effect,” which is the idea that more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere can be good for plants.

The post inspired some passions from readers and I’m curious to hear more from you about climate coverage in general. Especially as the Adirondack Explorer (which runs the Adirondack Almanack) has recently hired a climate reporter, Cayte Bosler.

Help us shape our coverage: Tell us the kinds of climate stories you’d like to see next in these pages and in Adirondack Explorer’s magazine.

Some examples to get the ball rolling:

  • How warmer temperatures are affecting lakes and ponds in the Adirondacks.
  • Ways communities are adapting/need to adapt to climate change
  • Changes in species living in the region and how wildlife is impacted.

Photo: Adirondack Youth Climate Summit students hold an ”I Am Pro Snow” rally at Mount Van Hoevenberg in this Adirondack Explorer file photo by Mike Lynch


Sunday, April 10, 2022

Weekly news round up

A collection of interesting reads:

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Saturday, April 9, 2022

Sunshine, sand, and a sunglasses-clad Sheltie on Sanibel Island

I see that some snow is still falling on you folks up north, but it is in the eighties down here on Sanibel Island and the water is also very nice. Just before leaving there was a world of birds still using the feeders and several birds feeding on the carcasses on the dam. The last evening, I had a mature Bald Eagle and immature Bald Eagle feeding right up until dark. The bunch of Slate-colored Juncos that had come out of the woods or moved north were under the feeders right until dark as well.

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Kid next to water

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