Wednesday, March 17, 2021

Injured hiker calls for help when separated from group

forest ranger reportsRecent NYS DEC Forest Ranger actions:

Town of North Elba
Essex County
Wilderness Rescue:
 On Mar. 13 at 6:41 p.m., DEC’s Ray Brook Dispatch received a call from a 27-year-old subject from Rochester suffering from a sore knee while hiking to Mount Marcy in the High Peaks Wilderness. The hiker did not have a headlamp or flashlight and reported that his four friends hiked out ahead of him. Just before 10 p.m., at Marcy Dam, Forest Ranger Sabo made contact with the hiker and two friends who had turned back to help him. Ranger Sabo and the hikers arrived back at the Loj parking lot at 11:16 p.m. and reunited the hikers with their group.


Wednesday, March 17, 2021

Your insights wanted: Recreation content

Mike Lynch

Looking to hear your thoughts to help shape future recreation content. The Adirondack Explorer would love to hear from you about recreation: What you enjoy doing outside, where you go for information. All outdoors experience levels welcome to participate!

In addition, we’d love your feedback about our current outdoors content. Can you let us know how we’re doing?

Click here to take a brief survey: https://us5.list-manage.com/survey?u=f2786fbb7862339a0b90113d7&id=0d1997b6e1&attribution=false

Photo of Mike Lynch by Gwendolyn Craig/Adirondack Explorer


Kid next to water
Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Erin go bragh: Irish heritage stories

donegal beard contestFor St. Patrick’s Day, here’s a round up of some Irish-themed content pulled from the Almanack archive:

Irish Fenians in the North Country: From the article: “The Fenian Brotherhood was an Irish Republican organization founded in New York in 1858 by John O’Mahoney. Their name is derived from legends about ancient Irish warriors called the Fianna. Their goal was an Irish Republic free of British rule.” READ MORE

Irish Beef Stew: A recipe for a traditional favorite. READ MORE

Irish Road Bowling in Indian Lake: From 2016, “One fun tradition that has been practiced in Ireland for hundreds of years in the counties of Cork and Armagh, is the sport of Irish Road Bowling. Indian Lake has been making this part of its St. Patrick’s Day tradition since 2006.” READ MORE

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Tree Buds: Honest Friends

winter treesHow to distinguish one leaf-bereft hardwood from another in winter is more of a challenge than summer tree ID, but there are practical reasons – and a few offbeat incentives – to tell one species from another in the dormant season. Hikers and skiers can benefit from such a skill, and in survival situations, hydration and warmth may depend on it. And if you’re among those who adore wintertime camping, you can have more fun when you know common woody species.

In late winter/ early spring, a pathogen-free beverage flows from sugar, silver, and red maples when temperatures rise above freezing in the day. A bit later in the spring yet prior to leaf-out, our native white (paper), yellow, black, grey, and river birches yield copious, healthful sap as well. The same can be said for wild grape stems, although it’s crucial that one can recognize other vines out there like Virginia creeper and poison ivy.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Adirondack Experience serves up food-themed programs

This spring, Adirondack Experience museum in Blue Mountain Lake is offering a variety of virtual, food-themed programs:

Maple Sugaring, Adirondack Style
MARCH 24  | 7:00pm – 8:00pm

It’s Maple Sugaring Time in the Adirondacks! Join Ivy Gocker, Library Director of the Adirondack Experience, and Matt Thomas, an independent maple syrup historian, as they talk about the history and material culture of maple sugaring in the Adirondack Region: the process, how it was done in the past, and the story of the Horse Shoe Forestry Company near Tupper Lake, which was once the largest syrup production operation in the world.
To register, please click on this zoom registration link. You will receive a confirmation with program link after signing up.
Sponsored by the Adirondack Experience and Albany Public Library

» Continue Reading.


Monday, March 15, 2021

When nature calls, let’s hope there isn’t a bear in the outhouse

outhouseSay what you will about Adirondack bears, but they have their dignity. They may trash your camp, scare the city folk and steal your salmon sandwich, but at least they don’t hide out in the bowels, so to speak, of ADK privies, lying in wait for the next passing derriere to present itself for a quick snack.

At least not that we know of. At least not yet. Let’s hope bears can’t read.

An extremely disturbing story was reported by the Associated Press in late February about an Alaskan woman visiting an outhouse and — well, best let her tell it: “I got out there and sat down on the toilet and immediately something bit my butt right as I sat down. I jumped up and I screamed when it happened.”

No kidding. And if you’re the bear, you’re lucky that’s all she did.

The young woman was wounded, but not badly, and her brother Erik assumed it was a squirrel or a mink that had done the damage. So he shined his headlamp down the pit and — well, long story short, for the second time that morning someone ran screaming from the outhouse.

Both sister and brother said it was a miracle her injuries weren’t more severe. That should be obvious. The bear was at the bottom of an outhouse, so he couldn’t have been in a very good mood to begin with. I know I wouldn’t have been. Then someone comes along and moons him, and you have to figure that’s the last straw. 

» Continue Reading.


Monday, March 15, 2021

Brush-burning ban in place March 16-May 14

Camp FireNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced the annual statewide ban prohibiting residential brush burning will begin March 16, and run through May 14. With spring approaching, DEC is reminding residents that conditions for wildfires are heightened in springtime when most wildfires occur.

Even though some areas of the state remain blanketed in snow, warming temperatures can quickly cause wildfire conditions to arise. DEC will post a Fire Danger Map rating for the 2021 fire season on DEC’s website once there is a moderate risk anywhere in the state.

Open burning of debris is the largest single cause of spring wildfires in New York State. When temperatures are warmer and the past fall’s debris and leaves dry out, wildfires can start and spread easily and be further fueled by winds and a lack of green vegetation. In 2020, DEC Forest Rangers extinguished 192 wildfires that burned a total of more than 1,122 acres. In addition, local fire departments, many of which are volunteer, all too often have to leave their jobs and families to respond to wildfires caused by illegal debris fires.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, March 15, 2021

Discussion topic: High Peaks use

Now that the High Peaks Advisory Group’s final report is out, have you had a chance to read through it?

Me either, ha ha. But here’s the Cliff Notes rundown from the DEC about the highlights:

Many of the report’s specific recommendations support DEC efforts that are currently underway with State and local partners to improve public safety and sustainably manage use of some of the High Peaks’ busiest trailheads, including:

» Continue Reading.


Monday, March 15, 2021

Paul Smith’s to hire 20 boat launch stewards

The Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute (PSC AWI) will once again provide free watercraft inspection and decontamination services at 14 locations in Old Forge, Inlet, Eagle Bay, Raquette Lake, and Blue Mountain Lake to help protect lakes from aquatic invasive species.

Each summer AWI employs more than 100 seasonal boat launch stewards to work with the boating public across the Adirondacks to help meet the “Clean, Drain, and Dry” standard required by New York State to stop the spread of aquatic invasive species. The program provides the public with free boat decontamination and inspection services at popular boat launches throughout the Adirondacks, including the most popular along the State Route 28 corridor.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 14, 2021

All about osprey: Widespread, prehistoric, fish eaters

OspreyThe osprey is second only to the peregrine falcon, as the most widely distributed bird of prey in the world, found on every continent but Antarctica, while picking up regional names like fish hawk, fish eagle and seahawk. There are probably half a million osprey globally, and osprey are one of the clearest indications of the health of any shallow fresh, brackish or saltwater habitat.

Like eagles, osprey are generally monogamous and tend to use the same nests year after year, so a successful osprey family indicates lots of fish, and since osprey are not as rigidly territorial as some other predators, the more osprey nests a habitat supports, the more likely the general health of the ecosystem is good. 

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 14, 2021

Weekly news round up

A collection of interesting reads:

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 13, 2021

Living ‘leave no trace’ principles mean speaking up in the moment

Brandon Wiltse photo

By Tyler Merriam, Donor Outreach Associate, Ausable River Association

Most of us recognize that throwing orange peels on the trail and leaving toilet paper on the ground does not leave the Adirondack ecosystem in its natural state. But how do we communicate that to less experienced outdoor recreationists? The answer, I believe, is to help people understand how their actions affect the areas they care about. The next time you’re hiking that special trail or paddling that glassy pond and see someone do something less than ideal, put your anger aside and give that person the benefit of the doubt. Remind them what a beautiful resource we have here and how lucky we all are to experience it together. Then, as a fellow recreationist, share with them the lessons you’ve learned over the years to keep this resource from being loved to death. Once outdoor enthusiasts develop their own land ethics, they’re far more likely to pass them along to friends, family, and the next generation of Adirondack stewards.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 13, 2021

Registration Open for 9th Annual Lake George Hike-A-Thon

hike a thonEarly-bird registration for the Lake George Land Conservancy’s (LGLC) Hike-A-Thon is now open, in an optimistic step towards a year of in-person events aimed at getting people out onto the land around Lake George. The event, to be held on July 5, is free and open to the public and offers a variety of hiking and paddle options. The early-bird registration period goes until April 30, and includes the incentive of a free t-shirt for each person registered.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, March 13, 2021

Eagle Banded 26 Years Ago Spotted In Lewis County

eaglesThis is an outstanding opportunity to see three American bald eagles devouring their lunch, but even more fantastic of an opportunity to be able to learn there’s more to the story.

Bill Straite of Oneida County sent us this photo a while ago. No doubt, it’s a great one! DEC wildlife biologists noticed right away the center eagle was banded, and contacted the federal bird banding laboratory to learn more about it.

The eagle was banded in June 1995 – 26 years ago – in Parishville, NY, St. Lawrence County.

Photo courtesy of Bill Straite.


Friday, March 12, 2021

Flight of the cicada: Insect gears up for big event

cicada maniaMeet the Cicada Beetle.  They are big, noisy and make an appearance by the billions every 13-17 years.

May 2021 marks the month and year that we here in New York will experience a natural phenomenon of the insect world.  This phenomenon about to happen is named Brood X or The Great Eastern Brood.  Starting in May of this year, for five to six weeks, it will be virtually impossible to miss Brood X, which will be the most widespread and prolific of the known generations of cicada in the U.S.

Cicadas are members of the superfamily Cicadidae and are physically distinguished by their stout bodies, broad heads, clear-membraned wings, and large compound eyes.

There are more than 3,000 species of cicadas, which fall into roughly two categories: annual cicadas, which are spotted every year, and periodical cicadas, which spend most of their lives underground and only emerge once every decade or two.  While annual cicadas can be found throughout the world, periodicals are unique to North America. Periodical broods are concentrated in the central and eastern regions of the United States, and some areas are home to multiple broods.

» Continue Reading.



Kid next to water

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