Posts Tagged ‘AARCH’

Wednesday, January 31, 2024

A Conversation with Dr. Alice Green

Outsider: Stories of Growing Up Black in the Adirondacks

What: Port Henry’s 20th Century African American Community: A Conversation with Dr. Alice Green

When: 4-5 p.m.Feb. 27 

Where: Virtual, via Zoom

Description:A conversation on Zoom with author Dr. Alice P. Green about her recent book, “Outsider: Stories of Growing Up Black in the Adirondacks.” “Outsider” details her experiences as her family grappled with poverty, race, and acceptance in the mid-20th-century Champlain Valley. Green’s book chronicles her experiences growing up in Essex County after her father started working at Republic Steel’s Witherbee-Sherman iron ore mines as part of the Great Migration. While Green’s family was one of only two Black families in the hamlet of Witherbee, the nearby community of Port Henry had a thriving Black community centered on Elizabeth Street.

Green will share stories of growing up in Witherbee and spending time in Port Henry, connecting buildings and places of significance to Port Henry and the surrounding area’s African American community.

Organized by Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH). Click here to register


Monday, January 22, 2024

Preserving Debar Pond Lodge

debar pond lodge

By Erin Tobin, Executive Director, Adirondack Architectural Heritage

For the last thirty years, Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) and others have advocated for the preservation of Debar Pond Lodge. In 2014, AARCH wrote the successful nomination for Debar Pond Lodge to the National Register of Historic Places. This designation is due to the site’s association with Adirondack tourism in the first half of the twentieth century, as an outstanding example of evolving early/mid-twentieth century Adirondack camp design, and as an important work of noted regional architect William Distin. 

We understand that without the Town of Duane’s support, the Debar Pond Lodge land exchange amendment is unlikely to pass the state legislature. We respect the town’s authority to oppose the amendment and removal of the six acres surrounding Debar Pond Lodge from the Adirondack Forest Preserve. Moving forward, AARCH will continue to work for the lodge’s preservation, seeking a constitutionally appropriate avenue for the building’s reuse.  » Continue Reading.


Saturday, January 13, 2024

Camp Santanoni Winter Weekends: Jan. 13-15, Feb. 17-19, March 16-17

Camp Santanoni, photo by Nancie Battaglia

On January 12, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced three Winter Weekend events will be held in 2024 at the historic Camp Santanoni in the town of Newcomb in the Adirondacks. Hosted by DEC and Friends of Camp Santanoni, along with partners Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH), the town of Newcomb, and SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry’s Adirondack Interpretive Center, the Winter Weekends invite visitors to enjoy winter recreation and exclusive winter access to the preserved buildings of the former great camp.

The 2024 Winter Weekend events will take place during the Martin Luther King, Jr., holiday weekend, Jan. 13-15; Presidents’ Day holiday weekend, Feb. 17-19; and the weekend of March 16-17.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, October 6, 2023

Public Opinion Survey Supports Debar Lodge

Keeseville, NY – For the past three years, state legislators, local and regional government officials, state agencies, environmental and economic development groups, and others have deliberated over the future of historic Debar Pond Lodge.  The 10-bedroom lodge and support buildings are located on State Forest Preserve land in the northern Adirondack town of Duane, Franklin County, and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. » Continue Reading.


Monday, November 29, 2021

Preservation League of New York State honors Steven Engelhart and  Whitcomb’s Garage 

steven englehartSteven Engelhart, Executive Director Emeritus of Adirondack  Architectural Heritage (AARCH), and Whitcomb’s Garage in Whallonsburg have been recognized  for Excellence in Historic Preservation by the Preservation League of New York State. Since 1984, the Preservation League’s statewide awards program has highlighted projects,  organizations, publications, and individuals that exemplify best practices in historic  preservation and recognize the people using historic preservation to build stronger  neighborhoods, create local jobs, provide affordable housing, open our eyes to overlooked  history, and save the places that are special to all of us.

Steven Engelhart received an Excellence in Historic Preservation award for his creative,  inspirational leadership, which has encouraged the protection of historic resources and strengthened the historic preservation movement in New York State. With over 40 years of experience in the field of historic preservation, Steven has become a leading voice in preservation efforts throughout the Adirondack region and a readily identifiable leader in saving its treasured places.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, December 6, 2020

Paying a visit to Debar Pond Lodge

Our Covid-19 socially distanced excursion last week took us to the Debar Tract on NYS Route 30, north of Paul Smith’s College and south of Malone. I wanted to see this area for myself after reading about the controversy over removal of the historic buildings on the shore of Debar Pond. (Click here for the latest article from Adirondack Explorer.)

» Continue Reading.


Monday, November 2, 2020

AARCH provides resources for educators

The Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) provides resources to teachers and educators all over Northern New York.

Their work in regional education, advocacy, and technical assistance expands K-12 Art, Science, Technology, Math, English, and Social Studies curriculums all over the region.

A resources page on their website, available at this link, showcases what AARCH offers in helping students and teachers delve into a new learning environment, allowing them to build an understanding around historical preservation in their respective communities.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Reflections on White Pine Camp

We at Adirondack Architectural Heritage were devastated to hear of the terrible fire that engulfed several of the buildings at White Pine Camp on Sunday evening. By Monday morning, we learned that the fire had been contained to a cluster of buildings in what was the former service complex and that the camp’s Main Lodge, lakeside cabins, boathouses, and other buildings were spared.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, May 24, 2020

Calls for Nominations for the AARCH Preservation Awards

The 25th annual AARCH Preservation Awards, which recognize exemplary historic preservation work throughout the Adirondacks, will take place on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020.

Residents of the Adirondack North Country region may submit their nominations of historic buildings in their communities that have been brought back to life.

The 2020 recipients will be honored during an event held at the Grace Memorial Chapel on Sabbath Day Point near Silver Bay on Lake George. Refreshments will be served post gathering. Projects of any size are eligible, and the deadline is June 1 to send in your nominations. To find applications and additional information, go to https://www.aarch.org/preserve/aarch-awards/nominations/.


Thursday, May 21, 2020

AARCH moves ahead with a delayed tour season

This 2020 season, due to the COVID-19 situation, AARCH remains tentative in providing the rich, educational opportunities they usually provide on their summer tours.

A copy of the AARCH 2020 summer newsletter is provided here, and outlines a balance of optimism with realism in planning their summer outing and tour season.  The majority of their late June programs have been moved to September, and October.

To reserve a spot, AARCH asks you email your preferred tour choices to info@aarch.org. This will enter you into the lottery for each event. Payment will be due once your spot is confirmed.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, March 17, 2020

Historic Preservation Myths: It Cost Too Much

Town of Westport Town Hall courtesy Press-RepublicanThis is the last a four part series. You can find the first part here.

Historic preservation has a set of myths. Some originate from a grain of truth, many are outright wrong, and still others require a more nuanced understanding. We run across these myths all the time in our work and constantly push back against them through education, persuasion, and the wisdom of our own experiences. In this series, we take on the four most persistent and sometimes damaging myths in our field.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 8, 2020

Historic Preservation Energy Efficiency Myths

historic preservation illustration

Myths pervade most aspects of life and they can be very persistent. Whether it’s “we only use 10% of our brain” or “George Washington had wooden teeth” these myths can be relatively harmless  – or they can really get in the way of true understanding and action.

Historic preservation has its own set of myths. Some originate from a grain of truth, many are outright wrong, and still others require a more nuanced understanding. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 5, 2020

Historic Preservation Myths: Government Money

Homeowner Hannah Hanford at her home in Saranac Lake provided by AARCH

Myths pervade most aspects of life and they can be very persistent. Whether it’s “we only use 10% of our brain” or “George Washington had wooden teeth” these myths can be relatively harmless  – or they can really get in the way of true understanding and action.

Historic preservation has its own set of myths. Some originate from a grain of truth, many are outright wrong, and still others require a more nuanced understanding. » Continue Reading.


Monday, March 2, 2020

Busting Historic Preservation Myths

former 1927 Willsboro High School into the Champlain Valley Senior CommunityMyths pervade most aspects of life and they can be very persistent. Whether it’s “we only use 10% of our brain” or “George Washington had wooden teeth” these myths can be relatively harmless  – or they can really get in the way of true understanding and action.

Historic preservation has its own set of myths. Some originate from a grain of truth, many are outright wrong, and still others require a more nuanced understanding. » Continue Reading.


Monday, February 17, 2020

Embedawatt: Valuing What We Have

symbol for the Embedawatt as envisioned by AARCHA recent opinion piece in the New York Times targeted historic preservation as an out-of-touch field that negatively impacts communities, as well as a movement that does not support building a more sustainable, environmentally-friendly planet. Alongside the responses of my historic preservation colleagues, I’d like to respectfully disagree with the Times piece, too.

Of the dozens of ways that historic preservation makes communities more vibrant, humane, and sustainable, I’d like to highlight a little understood and little appreciated virtue and value of existing buildings – their embodied energy.

At Adirondack Architectural Heritage we’ve invented a word for this value – Embedawatt. » Continue Reading.



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