Posts Tagged ‘Adirondack Council’

Saturday, June 8, 2024

Northeast Wilderness Trust to be honored with Adirondack Council’s Conservationist of the Year Award July 13

Adirondack Council logo.

Lake Placid, NY– The Adirondack Council will present its Conservationist of the Year Award to the Northeast Wilderness Trust for its efforts to permanently protect forests, reconnect wildlife habitat, and reestablish wilderness areas from Maine to the Adirondack Park. The award will be presented at Heaven Hill Farm, in Lake Placid, during the Adirondack Council’s annual Forever Wild Day Celebration, on Saturday, July 13. The Council’s annual membership meeting will be held virtually on Wednesday, July 10 at 4 p.m.

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Tuesday, May 14, 2024

APA Should Hold Hearing on Marina Expansion; Issues Demand More Study

Boater drives by marina

Ray Brook, NY – Five organizations concerned about the size, scope, and regional impacts of the proposed USL Marina on a small pond near Fish Creek Pond Campground are calling on the New York State Adirondack Park Agency (APA) to hold an adjudicatory public hearing on the application. The marina’s application is set to come before the APA Board at its May 16 monthly meeting in Ray Brook. The decision of whether to hold a public hearing is up to the Agency’s eleven voting decision-makers, or Board members.

The proposed commercial marina is a radical departure from the small boat livery that was formerly at the site of the proposed project.  The new proposal covers a vast area of water and shoreland devoted to commercial use by large watercraft. As proposed, the marina is likely to have significant adverse impacts on Lower Fish Creek Pond and on nearby, narrow channels connecting the Pond to Fish Creek, Upper Saranac Lake, and Follensby Clear Pond.

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Saturday, April 27, 2024

Most Adirondack Priorities Restored in Final State Budget

Adirondack Council logo

Lake Climate Studies, Clean Water Grants Secured; Timbuctoo Career Institute Funding Lower

Albany, NY – The Adirondack Council thanked Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart Cousins and Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie for working with Gov. Kathy Hochul to restore key Adirondack priorities in the $237-billion state budget, including money for scientific research and municipal clean water projects.

The Council also expressed thanks for the Legislature’s efforts to restore the full $500 million in annual funding to the state’s Clean Water grants program. The $250 million boost above the Governor’s original proposal will significantly improve the opportunities for Adirondack communities to obtain funding, the organization said. Rivers that flow from Adirondack lakes bring drinking water to millions of state residents.

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Friday, February 2, 2024

Adirondack Council’s testimony regarding transportation portion of Executive Budget

Kevin Chald at a state budget hearing

Greetings Chair Krueger, Chair Weinstein, Chair Kennedy, Chair Magnarelli and honored legislators. My name is Kevin Chlad, and I am the Director of Government Relations for the Adirondack Council. Thank you for the opportunity to testify at the public hearing today [Jan. 24] on an issue of critical public and environmental health facing the Adirondack Park and North Country.

The Adirondack Council is a 501 (c) 3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to ensuring the ecological integrity and wild character of the Adirondack Park. We do not accept any state grants. We envision an Adirondack Park with clean air and water, large ‘forever wild’ wilderness areas, working forests and farms, and vibrant, safe, inclusive communities.

We offer the following testimony in response to the transportation portion of the Governor’s Executive Budget proposal for the 2024-2025 fiscal year.

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Tuesday, January 30, 2024

ADK Groups Urge Backcountry Caution During April 8 Eclipse

total solar eclipse

Community-based celebrations provide safe, exciting viewing experiences 

Saranac Lake, NY – The Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST), Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK), and Adirondack Council are urging caution for those considering an Adirondack Park backcountry adventure to view the total solar eclipse this April.

On April 8, much of the Adirondack Park will be in the path of totality for the once-in-a-lifetime, full solar eclipse, and while the mountains and lakes of the Adirondacks may provide a beautiful backdrop, conditions in the Adirondack backcountry that time of year can be perilous.

Given the combined natural beauty of the Adirondacks and the eclipse, people may be considering a hike into the Adirondack wilderness to view it. However, it is likely that full winter conditions will be present on the trails and mountains at that time, with dangers to people and the environment if hikers are not prepared.

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Monday, January 29, 2024

Adirondack-area nonprofits welcome new hires

William W. Reiley, Ph.D.

Several Adirondack-area nonprofit organizations have recently announced a lineup of new leadership, staff, board members, and trustees. See below for details on these announcements by the following establishments, Adirondack Foundation, Adirondack Council, the Trudeau Institute, The Hyde Collection, and Silver Bay YMCA.

 

Trudeau Institute appoints William Reiley as new head of scientific research institute

Saranac Lake, NY —The Trudeau Institute Board of Trustees has named William W. Reiley, Ph.D., the next president, director and chief executive officer of Trudeau Institute.

Dr. Reiley is replacing William Chapin, who has announced plans to step down on Feb. 1. Chapin has accepted a new position at another organization in the Tri-Lakes region.

Dr. Reiley, who has served in a range of positions at Trudeau since 2006, is currently chief scientific officer at the research institute, as well as a principal investigator and head of TICRO Bioservices, the contract research unit he helped launch in 2011.

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Saturday, January 27, 2024

Critical cuts affect Adirondacks in Governor’s budget proposal

Sagamore Lake is one of 58 lakes that regularly monitored as part of a state-funded program that is now managed by the Adirondack Watershed Institute. Explorer file photo

 

Albany, NY – Gov. Kathy Hochul presented her Executive Budget proposal on Tuesday morning [Jan. 16], promoting efforts to fight climate change and make New York safer and more affordable, but when full budget details were released on Tuesday evening, the proposal included cuts to critical environmental programs such as the Clean Water Infrastructure Act, Adirondack Diversity Initiative, Timbuctoo Summer Climate and Careers Institute and Survey of Climate and Adirondack Lakes Ecosystems (SCALE). 

“By cutting the Timbuctoo Institute and SCALE research project, the Governor is not making a fiscal statement. She is making a policy statement,” said Adirondack Council Executive Director Raul J. Aguirre.  “You don’t close a $4 billion budget gap by cutting $4 million in science and high school programming that offer outsized benefits for frontline and disadvantaged communities.” 

While the Governor proposed laudable measures to fund water infrastructure projects in rural communities during her State of the State address last week, her budget proposes to cut annual water infrastructure spending in half, from $500 million to $250 million.   » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 21, 2024

State plan includes water quality grants, civic engagement

algal bloom on Rollins pond

Gov. Kathy Hochul will double the state’s grants to local governments that build new or renovate existing water and wastewater treatment systems, her State of the State message noted, vastly widening the pool of Adirondack communities that can now take advantage of state funding.

The Governor also outlined plans to curb harmful algal blooms and to engage more students in civic service that includes working to limit – and cope with — the impacts of climate change, the Adirondack Council noted today.

“Doubling the available clean water money will have an immediate positive impact on water quality across the Adirondacks,” said Raul J. Aguirre, Executive Director of the Adirondack Council. “For many small Adirondack communities, a state matching grant of 25% was not enough to make a multi-million-dollar wastewater project affordable for local taxpayers. Doubling those grants to 50% of the project cost changes the whole landscape for the better. Many more Adirondack hamlets and villages will be able to act to protect their residents, their lakes and the water that flows to the rest of the state through rivers that begin here.”

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Wednesday, December 13, 2023

Aaron Mair Brings Adirondack Climate Message To Dubai Summit

Adirondack Council logo.

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – Highlighting the global impacts of climate change on large iconic park landscapes, the Adirondack Council’s Aaron Mair is participating in the United Nations Climate Change Council of Parties gathering in Dubai. Mair, the Forever Adirondacks Campaign Director, is there advocating for global investments in the protection of large-scale ecosystems such as the Adirondack Park in New York State and federal climate impact mitigation strategies.

“Both here and around the globe, we need new investments in wilderness protection and we need to scale-up the science of climate protection,” said Mair.  “We have the potential to create an entirely new segment of the economy based on stabilizing and protecting the natural systems that support all life on earth. The Adirondacks are also living proof that careful protection can re-create wilderness where it had been lost to industrial impacts. That is a strong message of hope.”

Mair is at COP28 to represent the Adirondack Council, with assistance from The Wild Center, in Tupper Lake.

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Thursday, November 9, 2023

Paul Smith’s College VIC to offer “Hotter Planet, Hotter Politics” Lecture on Nov. 11

Graphic for Nov. 11 climate change presentation at Paul Smith's College VIC.

Paul Smiths, NY – As part of their Fall Lecture Series, Paul Smith’s College VIC will host a presentation called, “Hotter Planet, Hotter Politics,” featuring Bill McKibben and Rev. Lennox Yearwood, Jr. on Saturday, November 11 from 3 to 4 p.m. The lecture series is sponsored by the Adirondack Council and is free to students from Paul Smith’s College and North Country Community College, a donation of $5 from others is requested.

Bill McKibben is founder of Third Act, which organizes people over the age of 60 for action on climate and justice.

His 1989 book The End of Nature is regarded as the first book for a general audience about climate change, and has appeared in 24 languages. He’s gone on to write 20 books, and his work appears regularly in periodicals from the New Yorker to Rolling Stone. He serves as the Schumann Distinguished Scholar in Environmental Studies at Middlebury College, as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he has won the Gandhi Peace Prize as well as honorary degrees from 20 colleges and universities. He was awarded the Right Livelihood Award, sometimes called the alternative Nobel, in the Swedish Parliament. Foreign Policy named him to its inaugural list of the world’s 100 most important global thinkers.

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Friday, October 13, 2023

Adirondack Council presents 42nd annual State of the Park report

Cover of Adirondack Council's State of the Park report 2023

Albany, NY  – The Adirondack Park benefitted enormously from cooperation between environmental advocates and communities across the state this year, securing state funding for vital scientific research, Forest Preserve visitor management, and education and career training for a new generation of environmental leaders, the Council‘s annual State of the Park Report noted today.

“This year marks the beginning of two very exciting programs that will help the Adirondack Park understand and cope with the consequences of a changing climate,” said Adirondack Council Executive Director Raul J. Aguirre.  “The Legislature and Governor created a Study of Climate and Adirondack Lake Ecosystems that brings together major research institutions and environmental scientists to collect the data needed to assess the ecological health and develop plans to protect them.  This is a first-in-the-nation effort to develop a comprehensive protection plan for the park’s single greatest asset – abundant clean water.”

He thanked the leaders of both houses as well as members of the Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus for their combined efforts to assist the park and its communities.  In addition to environmental protection, new programs will mean well-paid new jobs and careers for Adirondack Park residents.

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Sunday, October 1, 2023

Adirondack area school district, non-profits welcome new hires

 

Loon on Adirondack lake

Several Adirondack area non-profit organizations and school districts have recently welcomed new staff members including The Adirondack Council and Northern Forest Canoe Trail, the Adirondack Sports Council, and the Raquette Lake Union Free School District. Please see below for details on these new hires and look for another roundup of new staff announcements on The Adirondack Almanack website tomorrow.

 

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Sunday, August 6, 2023

Chris Maron and Champlain Area Trails Receive Adirondack Council Award

CATS Adirondack Council award

At its Forever Wild annual event on Saturday, July 15, the Adirondack Council presented its Special Recognition award to Chris Maron and Champlain Area Trails (CATS) for “all the work he and the organization have done to further conservation in the greater Champlain Valley and Adirondacks.”

In presenting the award, John Davis, who serves as the Rewilding Advocate for the Council, said, “CATS, under Chris’ inspired leadership, has had a tremendously positive impact on the Champlain Valley. People now have more local trails to explore. As for saving land, CATS has worked with other land trusts to conserve almost half of the 20,000 acres of the Split Rock Wildway wildlife corridor, which connects Split Rock Wild Forest and woodlands in the Adirondacks.”  As he invited Maron to the stage, the crowd of over 200 people burst into a spontaneous standing ovation and applause.

After Maron expressed his thanks, he explained how, just fifteen years ago, there were few trails in the Champlain Valley which limited people from connecting with nature and hurt the economies of Champlain Valley communities because people bypassed them on their way to trails deeper in the Park.

“Now, we’ve created 45 trails totaling 78 miles and promoted them by publishing the CATS Trail Maps yearly,” said Maron. “These actions, along with all our outdoor activities, have connected people with nature, and as I hear from many business owners, town officials, and people out and about, the CATS trails are a big boost for local economies and our quality of life.”

And then, to the audience’s cheers, he pulled the newest edition of the CATS Central Champlain Valley Trails Map out of his back pocket and announced that CATS had published and received the newest edition of the map just two days before.

As the audience quieted, Maron acknowledged that “looking back is great, yet it’s about looking to the future. And that’s exciting because we have so many more trails to build—trails to cool places you hike to with friends, family, and on your own. And especially town-to-town trails that connect our communities. Meanwhile, we must conserve the vibrant natural communities, farmland, clean water, and scenic vistas people see from the trails.”

He then thanked the Council again for the award. He said to the audience that “Along with it honoring me, Champlain Area Trails, our board, staff, trail hosts, and volunteers, it honors you and the vision you have of life and love here in the Champlain Valley, the Adirondack Park, and the entire world.”

About Champlain Area Trails: Champlain Area Trails, founded in 2009, is an accredited land trust with a mission to make trails, protect land, connect people with nature, and promote economic vitality in the Champlain Valley. CATS has made 78 miles of trails, protected 983 acres, and hosted hundreds of hikes, outdoor education outings, and volunteer events, attracting thousands of visitors to the Adirondack’s Champlain Valley. Learn more at www.champlainareatrails.com

Photo Credit: From left to right, Adirondack Council’s Rewilding Advocate John Davis, Executive Director Rocci Aguirre, then Chris Maron, Adirondack Council Board Chair, Sarah Hatfield and Council Director of Conservation Jackie Bowen.


Monday, July 31, 2023

Timbuctoo Institute Hosts First Summer Cohort

timbuctoo cohort

The inaugural summer program hosted its first of three 12-day sessions, teaching NYC high school students about the environment and green career opportunities.

Last week, the brand-new Timbuctoo Climate and Careers Institute hosted its first ever cohort of students for the summer, just a year and a half after the concept of the program had been initially discussed.

The program, which was created in partnership with SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry and CUNY Medgar Evers College, brings high school students from New York City to the ESF campus in Newcomb. The program exposes students to green spaces they may not otherwise have access to, as well as to green careers, with the aim of diversifying students’ career considerations.

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Saturday, June 10, 2023

Conservationist of the Year Award to be announced at Adirondack Council’s Forever Wild Day Celebration

Caucus Chair Assembly Member Michaelle Solage, D-Elmont, right, views rainfall/air pollution testing equipment at the Adirondack Survey Corp laboratory in Ray Brook, October 2022.

Crown Point, NY – The Adirondack Council will present its Conservationist of the Year Award to the New York State Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative (BPHA) Caucus for its support of Adirondack environmental science, education, jobs and wilderness protection.

The presentation will take place during the Adirondack Council’s annual Forever Wild Day Celebration on July 15 at the Crown Point State Historic Site on the shore of Lake Champlain.  The Council will hold a virtual annual meeting of its members on Wednesday, July 12.

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