Posts Tagged ‘Adirondack Explorer’

Saturday, August 24, 2019

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Thursday, August 15, 2019

Bill McKibben On Adirondack Climate Action

The Adirondack Explorer asked Vermont author, environmentalist and former Adirondacker Bill McKibben to discuss the climate-crisis arguments in his new book, Falter, and how the issue affects the Adirondacks.

McKibben spoke about climate change at an event hosted by the Explorer and The Wild Center in August, 2019.

In its July/August 2019 issue, the Adirondack Explorer asked McKibben to discuss the climate-crisis arguments in his new book, “Falter,” and how the issue affects the Adirondacks. Following is a transcript of the questions and answers.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 26, 2018

Questions Raised Over Adirondack Conservation Easements

lumberyard by Mike LynchWhile some conservationists are concerned about what they perceive as recently increased logging in the Adirondack Park, New York’s Department of Environmental Conservation has begun providing more information about the nearly 781,000 acres of privately owned timberlands covered by state conservation easements.

Those agreements govern many of the larger logging tracts and prevent other commercial development. » Continue Reading.


Friday, June 29, 2018

Adirondack Explorer Publishes 20th Anniversary Issue

Explorer anniversaryWe just received our July/August issue in the Adirondack Explorer office. It’s our twentieth anniversary issue and packed with good stuff, including a timeline featuring milestones in the history of the Explorer.

Carl Heilman II took the cover photo, an aerial shot of the old titanium mine in Tahawus. The Explorer partnered with Lighthawk, a nonprofit organization, to fly over the High Peaks and the mine. The photos illustrate an in-depth story by our new watchdog reporter, Michael Virtanen, on the history and future of the mine. Incidentally, the flight confirmed that the controversial tanker cars have been removed from the railroad tracks leading to the mine. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Adirondack Explorer Publishes Outings Guide

The Adirondack Explorer recently published a special edition of its Annual Outings Guide in commemoration of the magazine’s twentieth anniversary.

The 2018 guide is larger than previous outings guides, with a more durable cover to ensure that it will last as a resource for years to come.

One hundred pages long, the Annual Outings Guide reprints thirty-one stories about outdoor adventures that appeared in the Explorer over the past decade—hikes, paddles, ski tours, slide scrambles, rock climbs, biking, and whitewater rafting. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, May 17, 2018

Adirondack Explorer Names New Editor

Brandon Loomis, a senior environmental reporter at the Arizona Republic since 2012, has been named editor of the Adirondack Explorer. He will start in July, succeeding Editor Phil Brown, who announced his retirement earlier this year.

Loomis began his career at a weekly newspaper in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, where he covered the Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks during the buildup to wolf reintroduction in that region. He has since worked at newspapers in Idaho, Utah, Alaska, and Arizona and at the Chicago bureau of the Associated Press. He was city editor of the Juneau Empire in Alaska during the mid-2000s. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, February 1, 2018

Photo Contest: Dramatic Adirondack Skies

The Adirondack Explorer‘s next “Views of the Park” photo contest takes a look upward for dramatic sky photos.

Post your photos to Facebook and Instagram using the hashtag #adkexplorerpix.

Explorer staff will choose their favorite photos to be included on the Adirondack Explorer website and highlighted in the bimonthly magazine. If yours is chosen, you’ll receive a free one-year subscription to the Explorer.

Don’t worry, you don’t need to be a professional. Just get out your phone and snap a pic. Or send one from a previous year.

Plus a People’s Choice

We will post our favorite few photos to Facebook and let readers vote for a “People’s Choice” to be recognized in the magazine.

And thank you to all who sent in photos for the last contest: “Winter views.” We loved them all so much it was hard to choose. Check out the final five winners.


Friday, January 5, 2018

10 Hopes for the Adirondacks in the New Year

Boreas River headwaters. Photo by Phil Brown 9/5/16.It’s January, time for a fresh, blank sheet on which to start our new year. Plenty of us are making renewed attempts at weight loss or looking to get better organized or at least vowing to break our addiction to twenty-four-hour cable news.

Here at the Explorer, we’re renewing our hopes for smart decision-making in the Adirondacks and more chances to work together to ensure that the Park that we all love so much is protected for generations to come.

Here are ten hopes we have for 2018. » Continue Reading.


Saturday, November 25, 2017

Adirondack Historian Publishes Essay Collection

Philip Terrie bookThe historian Philip Terrie has come out with a new book that collects nearly sixty articles that have appeared in the Adirondack Explorer newsmagazine over the past two decades.

Seeing the Forest: Reviews, Musings, and Opinions from an Adirondack Historian covers a wide range of subjects: Adirondack art and literature, the history of the Forest Preserve, the scourges of acid rain and climate change, the meaning of wilderness, and the saga of a cougar that trekked from South Dakota to the Northeast.

Terrie, who lives in Ithaca and Long Lake, is retired from teaching American studies at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. Seeing the Forest is his fourth book. His previous works also dealt with the Adirondacks. His best known is Contested Terrain: A New History of Nature and People in the Adirondacks. He also is the author of Forever Wild: A Cultural History of Wilderness in the Adirondacks and Wildlife and Wilderness: A History of Adirondack Mammals.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, October 30, 2017

New Book Tells History Of Park’s African-Americans

It’s obvious to anyone who spends time here that the vast majority of people who live in or visit the Adirondack Park are white. This could have consequences for the Forest Preserve, because the Preserve belongs to all New Yorkers and its future is in their hands.

The latest census data indicate that about 18 percent of the state’s population is African-American (another 19 percent is Hispanic or Latino).

Although few African-Americans live in the Adirondacks, our region is not without its own black history. Most people will think of John Brown’s farm in North Elba and Gerrit Smith’s effort to relocate black farmers. But there is much more to the story.

Sally E. Svenson tells the rest of the story in Blacks in the Adirondacks: A History, a new book published by Syracuse University Press. As it turns out, African-Americans lived and worked in the Park as miners, loggers, musicians, waiters, and baseball players, among other things.

The historian Philip Terrie gives a favorable review to Svenson’s book in the November/December issue of the Adirondack Explorer newsmagazine.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, August 10, 2017

Take Adirondack Explorer With You

The Adirondack Explorer has a new app, optimized for phone and tablet screens, that has everything you love about our bimonthly magazine focusing on the issues important to the Adirondacks.

And now the stories can include videos, additional photos, audio, and links to other stories to help readers gain a better understanding of what’s going on in the Park. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 9, 2017

Explorer Launches Adirondack Photo Contest

We know you have a good shot of the Adirondacks in that phone full of photos. The Adirondack Explorer is beginning a new photo feature, Views of the Park, which will highlight readers and the scenes they love in and around the Adirondacks. Don’t worry, you don’t need to be a professional. Just get out your phone and snap a pic.

The Explorer will provide the theme—the first is “My Dog Loves the Adirondacks” — and you post your photo to Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram using the hashtag #adkexplorerpix » Continue Reading.


Saturday, February 18, 2017

Sneak Preview Of Adirondack Explorer’s Next Issue

The February meeting of the Adirondack Park Agency’s board was a busy one. The staff spent two days discussing the Boreas Ponds Tract, diving deep into the ecology of the place. The board, however, took no action on the classification of the 20,758-acre parcel, which has stirred up so much debate on the Almanack. That decision could come this spring.

The board also discussed the controversial Lake Flower Resort in Saranac Lake. Many people have argued that the hotel would be too big and too close to Lake Flower, but the APA board voted to approve the project.

Both stories are covered in-depth in the March/April issue of the Adirondack Explorer, which is now at the printer’s.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, December 27, 2016

What’s New In The Adirondack Explorer

Some time ago I came across a book titled Fifty Favorite Climbs: The Ultimate North American Tick List. The author, Mark Kroese, asked fifty celebrated climbers to reveal their favorite climbs on the continent.

Most leaned toward big or exotic routes. Conrad Anker, for example, picked an alpine rock climb on Baffin Island near the Arctic Circle. Alex Lowe chose the Grand Traverse, his eight-hour dash over seven summits in Wyoming’s Tetons.

But I was especially interested in the choice of Jeff Lowe, one of the greatest mountaineers of his generation. Lowe (no relation to Alex) has climbed all over the world and put up hundreds of first ascents. His favorite climb in North America? A four-pitch ice route on Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain that overlooks the Northway. It’s called Gorillas in the Mist.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, December 23, 2016

Adirondack Explorer Names New Publisher

Tracy Ormsbee, a senior editor at the Albany Times Union, has been named publisher of the Adirondack Explorer, effective March 1, 2017.  Ormsbee will succeed Publisher Thomas Woodman, who announced earlier this year that he planned to retire in 2017.

Ormsbee currently serves as Senior Editor/Features and Sports at the Times Union as well as Executive Editor of Times Union Magazines. She leads a team that creates the newspaper’s features and sports content and two magazines. She also acts as the lead editor for the Sunday newspaper. Ormsbee heads the Time Union’s Women@Work magazine and professional network and manages the Women@Work Executive Board, which consists of top businesswomen in the Albany area. Long active in state and national journalism organizations, she serves as president of the board of the New York State Associated Press Association. » Continue Reading.