Posts Tagged ‘Adirondack Harvest’

Monday, September 28, 2020

Spinning cream into Gold

Learn about how high-quality cultured butter is made, in this piece by Kelsie Meehan for Adirondack Harvest. Meehan is the owner and butter-maker of Gold Bar Butter. She has been milking cows and making cultured butter since 2012.

Read more: https://adirondackharvest.com/churning-up-gold-in-the-adirondacks/

Photo: Kelsie Meehan pours cultured cream into the churn. Photo by Lisa Godfrey for Adirondack Harvest.


Friday, September 18, 2020

Adirondack Harvest Festival goes ‘free range’

Adirondack Harvest and our annual Harvest Festival supports community businesses, the local economy, and fresh food access by creating awareness and understanding about farms, forestry, fiber and flower businesses in the Adirondacks.

We took the opportunity to host an alternative format to this year’s festival, going in new directions that expand the limits of the traditional festival format. The celebrations will be a mix of community events and virtual tours where you will get to meet the growers and makers in a new way.

And all in-person events are featuring safe, social distancing, so you’ll experience the delicious, fun festival activities- just a little more spread out.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, July 20, 2020

Woodworkers, sawmills keep busy during pandemic

With more people stuck inside during the pandemic, DIY projects have spiked and local contractors have also seen their services in demand.
In a recent article on Adirondack Harvest’s website, author Tim Rowland speaks with area sawmill owners and woodworkers about how they are keeping busy.

CLICK HERE TO READ

Photo: Dave Warner Jr. saws rough cut lumber at the Wood Grain Sawmill in Keeseville. He said the mill he runs with his dad has been busy with orders this year, as people who are home have more time for wood-related projects. Courtesy of Adirondack Harvest.


Sunday, May 17, 2020

Survey: People are buying more local food during pandemic

Vegetables at a Farmers marketOne thing is sure: all of us have learned that the world can change overnight. So far, supply chains within the global food system have not been totally disrupted. Hopefully they won’t be. But food resiliency means a community has farms growing food on the soil surrounding community members. If supply chains break, your neighboring farms are growing food nearby. But in order for community farms to survive, they can’t be a last resort. Community members have to see the value in knowing that security is there, every day, and support it… or farms don’t survive.

Many people have been thinking about food differently during this unprecedented pandemic. Going out to get food means something different than it did mere weeks ago. We’re wondering where our food came from and how many people touched it before us. Or we don’t want to go out to get it at all…

So, like magic, local farm and food businesses in the Adirondacks have responded rapidly in innovative ways to feed the community. Local farmers’ markets, farmstands, cooked meal deliveries, and other local food vendors are noticing amazing support from the community. Adirondack Harvest wanted to understand more about the relationship of local food to the community during this unusual time. Here’s what you told us!

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, February 27, 2020

Adirondack Harvest Annual Meetings Planned

adirondack harvest logoThe Annual Adirondack Harvest Board Meeting has been scheduled for Tuesday, March 3rd, and the Southern Chapter Meeting will be held at the Warren County Soil & Water Conservation District office on Schroon River Road in Warrensburgh. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, November 14, 2019

Winter Farmers Markets in the Adirondack Region

With the fresh snow on the ground, perhaps making sure you get your servings of local vegetables, meat, and dairy isn’t at the top of your list. But there are ways to enjoy that farm fresh flavor at various locations around the Adirondacks, while still enjoying the new snow – winter farmers markets.

Adirondack shops like Lake Placid’s Green Goddess Natural Market, Saranac Lake’s Nori’s Village Market, or Keeseville Farmacy provide wonderful year-round local produce. You can also stop by the farms and buy directly from our local farmers. The region’s indoor farmers markets offer a variety of vendors, one-stop shopping, and a fun way to meet the folks who are growing your food. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 18, 2019

Adirondack Harvest Festival Set For Sept 21

Adirondack Harvest Festival horse carriage rideThe 4th Annual Adirondack Harvest Festival has been scheduled for Saturday, September 21 at the Essex County Fairgrounds in Westport, from noon to 6 pm, with a pre-festival hike at 10 am.

The Harvest Festival is a regional event celebrating agriculture and the harvest in the Adirondacks and Champlain Valley. » Continue Reading.


Monday, July 15, 2019

Adirondack Harvest: Farmers Markets Support Local Growers

Saranac Lake Village Farmers Market courtesy Regional Office of Sustainable TourismFarmers Markets (marketplaces where people gather to buy and trade goods and services, exchange news, and share stories with one another) can be traced back 5000-years, to Egyptian villages and towns along the Nile.

They have deep roots in American history too; enduring as a part of our society, business, and trade since 1634, when the first Farmers’ Market in the ‘New World’ opened for business in Boston, Massachusetts. Throughout much of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, outdoor marketplaces remained vital centers of commerce in both American cities and rural communities. » Continue Reading.


Thursday, February 7, 2019

Adirondack Harvest Regional Meetings Planned

The Annual Regional Meetings of Adirondack Harvest is set to be held on Tuesday, February 12th and streamed live to local chapters.

Adirondack Harvest’s goal is to further sustainable agriculture in the Adirondack region and surrounding areas.  » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 6, 2019

Buying Local Food During An Adirondack Winter

As we head into the dead of winter the roads are icy, it’s cold outside, and farmers’ markets are becoming a distant memory of summer (although some can still be found here and there), it can be a challenge to remain dedicated to going the extra distance or to making the extra stop to buy local food. However, it is important to remember that an abundance of local food is still available that there are numerous benefits to buying locally grown food. » Continue Reading.


Sunday, January 28, 2018

CSAs: Taking Control, Ownership of Our Food System

CSA veggiesIn this age of global markets and marketing, more often than not, the food we eat is grown on large industrial farms; then shipped across the country, or from central or South America, or overseas, to huge distribution centers, where it’s sorted, packaged, processed, and then trucked to chain supermarkets, convenient stores, and fast food outlets.

We seldom think about the environmental impacts resulting from expanded mechanization and transportation of foodstuffs over great distances; of the ecological consequences of large-scale mono-cropping of food with intensive use of pesticides; or the impacts that food globalization has on our health (e.g. 2/3 of Americans are now considered overweight or obese). » Continue Reading.


Saturday, September 23, 2017

A Report From The Adirondack Harvest Festival

A customer makes her selections at a local vegetable grower’s farm stand at the Adirondack Harvest Festival in WestportLast weekend, I attended the Adirondack Harvest Festival, which was held at the at the Essex County Fairgrounds and adjoining Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) office in Westport. The family-oriented event had something for everyone and proved to be a marvelous opportunity to see the diversity of small agriculture in northern New York, and to meet and speak with area small-agribusiness owners and Extension agriculture researchers and educators. And with free admission, free music, and free educational demonstrations, including gourmet mushroom cultivation, soap making, beginner beekeeping, cider pressing, and much more, CCE, along with participating farmer-presenters, and numerous sponsors (Thank you so much!) made it as inexpensive as possible for the hundreds who were there, to attend, learn, and generally make the most of the afternoon. » Continue Reading.


Monday, June 13, 2016

Edible Forest Garden Tour Planned For June 18th

A Forest Garden (courtesy Chickenshack, North Wales)Adirondack Harvest is co-sponsoring an educational workshop in Cross Island Farms’ Edible Forest Garden on Saturday, June 18 from 1 pm to 4 pm.

Over the past three seasons Dani Baker, co-owner of Cross Island Farms, has developed just under an acre of her certified organic farm as a multi-functional edible forest garden encompassing numerous permaculture principles and practices. Attendees will join her as she describes the process of planning and planting over 300 cultivars of edible fruits, nuts, berries, and other edibles, both native and uncommon; learn about factors considered in deciding where and with what to plant the seven permaculture layers she has incorporated; and identify a large variety of supportive plants integrated into the landscape. Attendees will have an opportunity to sample edible fruits, flowers, greens and herbs in season and go home with a potted plant to begin or add to their own garden. » Continue Reading.


Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Essex County Cheese Tour Offers Local Dairy Treats

asgaardfarm_newI’ve made my own yogurt for years and recently started experimenting with fermented food. I’m now struggling to produce Kefir without a grainy taste.

I just can’t seem to get the balance right. With a cupboard full of sourdough starter and ginger beer plant grains, my pantry looks like a science experiment.

With everything else bubbling and brewing, the one product I have no desire to make is cheese. » Continue Reading.


Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Laurie Davis: The Farm Bill, Local Foods, And You

adirondack harvest logoIt’s been a few months now since President Obama signed into law the Agricultural Act of 2014. You probably remember hearing about it under another name: the (long overdue) Farm Bill. There was much hoopla in the press when, after a delay of over a year, it finally became a law. OK, I can sense your eyes glazing over or darting to the next article. But wait! Just bear with me.

The Farm Bill (as we shall refer to it from here on out) is chock full of some good news for the local food movement and, whether or not you realize it, many parts of this legislation will affect you. I’m going to break this article up into two parts to address all the positives that will be supported by this Farm Bill, so let’s begin part 1! » Continue Reading.



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