Posts Tagged ‘adirondack hiking trails’

Monday, May 9, 2022

DEC Shares Safety Tips on Spring Recreation in the Adirondacks

Mud Season Muddy Trail Adirondacks (Adirondack Mountain CLub Photo)The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) reminds visitors to recreate responsibly in the Adirondacks this spring to help protect State lands for future generations. Spring is an excellent time to get outdoors and enjoy warming temperatures, but it can also pose many risks to outdoor enthusiasts, wildlife, and natural resources. DEC encourages visitors to public lands to recreate responsibly to protect themselves and the resource.

Practice the Seven Principles of Leave No TraceTM: Leave No Trace™ principles provide a framework for safe and sustainable recreation. Based on outdoor ethics rather than rules, the principles provide guidelines that can be tailored to a variety of outdoor activities and an individual’s specific experience. Before heading out to visit State lands, DEC encourages outdoor adventurers to review and familiarize themselves with these principles to help be prepared, stay safe, and minimize damage to shared lands and waterways.

Follow the Muddy Trail Advisory: Hikers are advised to avoid hiking on high elevation trails above 2,500 feet until further notice. Despite recent warm weather, high elevation trails are still covered in slowly melting ice and snow. These steep trails feature thin soils that become a mix of ice and mud as winter conditions melt and frost leaves the ground. Sliding boots destroy trail tread, damage surrounding vegetation, and erode thin soils, increasing the likelihood of washouts; rotten snow and monorails are a safety hazard even with proper equipment; and high elevation and alpine vegetation are extremely fragile during this time.

» Continue Reading.


Saturday, May 7, 2022

Spring cleaning in the Adirondacks: Yard work and clearing blowdowns and debris from trails

Well, it froze every morning this week, and even spit some snow, but nothing stuck here. They had spring skiing at both Whiteface and Gore Mountains this weekend which must have been a late season for both. I worked around the yard, saw a few blackflies in the air, and they bombed me a few times. Better get out those hummer feeders soon, as last year they came here on May 4. That’s not an early date, but more than a week earlier than the year before. They almost always get here before Mother’s Day, and I’ve had to thaw out the feeders more than once to keep them going. Even with these cold temperatures some of the little wildflowers have popped out such as trout lily, coltsfoot, and spring beauty.

» Continue Reading.


Friday, April 15, 2022

NYS DEC issues annual muddy trail advisory for Adirondacks

Mud Season Muddy Trail Adirondacks (Adirondack Mountain CLub Photo)

Hikers advised to temporarily avoid high elevation trails and prepare for variable conditions on low elevation trails.

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today urged hikers to postpone hikes on Adirondack trails above 2,500 feet until high elevation trails have dried and hardened. DEC advises hikers on how to reduce negative impacts on all trails and help protect the natural resources throughout the Adirondacks during this time.

High elevation trails: Despite recent warm weather, high elevation trails above 2,500 feet are still covered in slowly melting ice and snow. These steep trails feature thin soils that become a mix of ice and mud as winter conditions melt and frost leaves the ground. The remaining compacted ice and snow on trails is rotten, slippery, and will not reliably support weight. “Monorails,” narrow strips of ice and compacted snow at the center of trails, are difficult to hike and the adjacent rotten snow is particularly prone to postholing.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, April 14, 2022

Hiking with Grandma Beth: Old Forge resident shares coverage of Nelson Falls springtime hike

As an extension of our recent post about an Old Forge grandmother, Beth Pashley, avid hiker and talented photographer, The Adirondack Almanack will be featuring snippets of Pashley’s hiking adventures on a year-round basis including her visually-striking and artistic nature photographs. Pashley was inspired to embrace the great outdoors with her grandchildren starting at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, dubbing the family bonding time as “The Grandma Chronicles.”

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, March 27, 2022

Old Forge grandmother, Beth Pashley, chronicles her picturesque Adirondack hiking adventures

Spring has sprung in the Adirondacks, and although the coming of springtime signals a time of renewal and helps many to come out of the “winter blues,” early Spring also means gray skies, soggy yards, and mud, lots of it.

What better time to showcase the serene beauty of the Adirondack region, while highlighting the artistic talents of one Adirondack grandmother who found rejuvenation, peace and serenity in the mountains, igniting a newfound adoration for hiking that she hopes will span across many generations in her family.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, March 26, 2020

Adirondack conditions (3/26): Stay close to home

This weekly report of outdoor recreation conditions in the Adirondacks sent out from the NYS DEC.

Contribute Your Knowledge: Add a comment below, or send your observations, corrections, updates, and suggestions to editor@adirondackalmanack.com

Emergency Situations: If you get lost or injured; keep calm and stay put. If you have cell service, call 911 or the DEC Forest Ranger Emergency Dispatch, 518-891-0235.

» Continue Reading.



Wait! Before you go:

Catch up on all your Adirondack
news, delivered weekly to your inbox