Posts Tagged ‘Adirondack invasive species’

Monday, October 23, 2023

Partnership to Keep Invasive Plants off Trails

Dix Boot brush stationKEENE, NY –Staff at the Ausable River Association (AsRA) have been building and installing hiking boot brush stations at trailheads to help keep terrestrial invasive species from spreading.

The new initiative builds upon AsRA‘s ongoing effort of preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species through placement of wader wash stations along the river during fishing season.

Invasive species are plants or animals that are non-native to an area and can cause environmental or economic harm. Introductions of invasive species can disrupt ecosystems, causing the loss of native species. Boot brush stations not only provide information about invasive species, specifically terrestrial invasive species and the threat they pose to native ecosystems, they also provide a simple way for people to help stop the spread.
» Continue Reading.


Monday, October 16, 2023

Wasps released to take out Emerald Ash Borer

a young woman ties string around a treeKEENE VALLEY – The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program has added a new biological control option to its toolbox for managing invasive forest pests.

Biocontrols, as they are often called, are specialized organisms that are introduced for the purpose of preying on a specific invasive species, with the goal of reducing the invasive species’ population over time.
» Continue Reading.


Monday, June 19, 2023

USDA is Surveying for Invasive Insects in New York

spotted lanternfly

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is surveying for three invasive plant pests in New York this year: the box tree moth (Cydalima perspectalis), spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) (pictured above), and the European cherry fruit fly (Rhagoletis cerasi L.)

European Cherry Fruit Fly

European Cherry Fruit Fly

Box Tree Moth

Box Tree Moth

APHIS asks residents and business owners to help limit the spread of invasive plant pests by following local quarantines. Please also allow agricultural survey teams onto your property for survey work and to hang insect traps. The insect traps help agricultural officials track invasive insect movement and are crucial to mounting an effective response against these damaging pests. We need your help to be successful. USDA and State surveyors working in the field will have official credentials identifying them as USDA or State employees. The surveys are underway and will continue through the fall.

For more information about the box tree moth, spotted lanternfly, and European cherry fruit fly, visit the APHIS website. To receive email updates, subscribe to the Plant Protection Act 7721 topic in the APHIS Stakeholder Registry.


Wednesday, March 1, 2023

Invasives update: The good, the bad and the promising

Despite an omnipresent threat of invasive species entering or spreading in the Adirondack Park, around three-quarters of Adirondack waterways remain free of aquatic invasive species.

Conservationists battling the spread of invasive species in the park like to cite that fact as a sign of the park’s still-pristine nature and as a clarion call to continue their work.

The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program, a small team that coordinates efforts to fight invasives in the park, this week released its annual report. The report highlights the growing threat of forest pests like hemlock wooly adelgid on Lake George and the looming threat of round goby and hydrilla, which have yet to break through the park’s borders.

APIPP reported five new waterbodies found to contain invasive species within its area: Lake Roxanne and Tracy Brook in Clinton County, the St. Regis River and a connected wetland in Franklin County, and Park Lake in Hamilton County.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, October 10, 2022

Invasive Species at Our Door: Adirondack Invasive Species Summit set for Oct. 19

BLUE MOUNTAIN LAKE—A summit to address two invasive species that are a threat to the Adirondacks will include a discussion on new research that shows a link between hydrilla and the death of eagles in the Southeastern United States. The Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program will host a free symposium, “Invasive Species at our Door: Adirondack Invasive Species Summit,” from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 19 at Adirondack Experience, the Museum on Blue Mountain Lake. The event will cover two species that could dramatically impact Adirondack forests and freshwater ecosystems: hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), a forest pest, and hydrilla, an aquatic invasive plant.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, August 14, 2022

Remember to Use Local Firewood When Camping

Firewood

Many people like to take firewood from their homes before traveling to a campsite. Invasive pests like the emerald ash borer or Asian long-horned beetle often hitch a ride to new areas in untreated wood. As a result, transport of untreated wood across the state has caused outbreaks of these damaging pests.

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, July 12, 2022

Free virtual webinar “Backyard Invasives” set for July 20

ADIRONDACKS – Anyone can help prevent the spread of invasive species, even without leaving their yard. That’s the gist of the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program’s free webinar “Backyard
Invasives—Identification and Management of Terrestrial Invasive Species,” which will run from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, July 20.

“A lot of invasive species tend to grow on forest edges and roadsides, and some get planted intentionally, making people’s yards an ideal habitat,” said APPIP Terrestrial Invasive Species Coordinator Becca Bernacki.

Invasive species are plants, insects, fish and other animals that are not native to a region and cause ecological, economic or human health harm. They can reproduce quickly, outcompete native vegetation and are often spread by human activity.

Yards not only provide a welcoming habitat for invasives, they’re also heavily traveled upon, which increases the opportunity for plants and seeds to be unintentionally relocated. Mowing and landscaping are two ways unwanted plants can be spread. And while it isn’t easy to control the spread of invasive species, understanding how to identify and manage them are things anyone can do.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, February 13, 2022

Join the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Winter Mapping Challenge


hwa invasive mappingDid you know that winter is the best time to check for hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA)? We need your help monitoring this invasive species, particularly along the “leading edge” of the distribution that runs across the state.

Now through March 12, NY iMapInvasives and the NYS Hemlock Initiative are hosting NY’s first statewide Winter Mapping Challenge. Join the challenge to help monitor this invasive species and compete to win a prize!

To participate: Get outside, find some hemlock trees, check for white “fuzz balls” on the undersides of twigs, and report your findings to NY iMapInvasives – earning the coveted champion title could be that easy! The top reporter of presence and not-detected records for HWA from February 12 through March 12 will win the challenge.

Visit iMap’s website to learn more about the challenge and connect with HWA mapping efforts in your area.

Photo submitted to iMapInvasives by Observer #22202

» Continue Reading.


Monday, February 7, 2022

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program unveils annual report, announces upcoming workshops

APIPP annual reportThe Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP) unveiled its 2021 Annual Report showcasing major advances in reducing the threats invasive species pose to the Adirondack region. Last year, more than 30 organizations and 100 volunteers shared their ideas, time, and resources to advance the mission of APIPP. Through an interdisciplinary and highly collaborative approach, APIPP examines invasive species impacts, evaluates resources, and takes action to protect natural resources in the Adirondacks.

“For well over two decades, the APIPP team has worked tirelessly to protect the Adirondacks from the negative impacts of invasive species. Last year we brought new partnerships and scientific innovation to bear in the fight against terrestrial and aquatic invasive species. We are grateful to our expansive network of partners and to our community volunteers for working alongside us to safeguard our unique Adirondack lands and waters,” said Tammara Van Ryn, APIPP Program Manager.

» Continue Reading.


Monday, October 11, 2021

Report Invasive Jumping Worms

wormsAttention, fall gardeners! While earthworms are usually a welcome sight in your garden, not all earthworms are alike. Jumping worms, sometimes known as “crazy worms,” are an invasive species native to Asia that are being found increasingly in many parts of New York State.

Jumping worms primarily stay in the top layer of soil, leaching nutrients and turning topsoil into a texture similar to coffee grounds. This makes it difficult for many plants to grow, including garden plants, trees, and lawns. You can tell the difference between a jumping worm and a less destructive European earthworm by examining the worm’s collar (clitellum). Jumping worms have a collar that is milky-white, relatively close to the head and flush with their bodies.

Here’s how you can help prevent the spread of jumping worms:

» Continue Reading.


Tuesday, June 29, 2021

On the Hunt for Invasive Species


Adult Asian longhorned beetle in a poolNew #OnesToWatch Map Helps Protect our Lands and Waters

Making sure the lands and waters you love to hunt and fish stay healthy is one of the best ways we can support wildlife. Invasive species are plants and animals that not only harm our forests and waterways, they can harm New York’s fish and wildlife. Hunters, anglers, and wildlife watchers like you can be a first line of defense, and there’s an easy way for you to know what to look for: DEC’s #OnesToWatch interactive map!

The #OnesToWatch map makes sure you know what invasive species we are looking for in your area, how you can identify them, and makes it easier for you to quickly report them to us. Click on your region of the map to see the species DEC is tracking in your neck of the woods. Then follow the link for each species to find more detailed information, including info on how to easily report sightings. Your reports can help protect the places you know and love for generations to come!

For more information on DEC’s #OnesToWatch campaign and the successes we’ve had as a result of people like you getting involved, visit our find and report page.

Photo: Adult Asian longhorned beetle in a pool/DEC photo


Tuesday, May 18, 2021

Bugs on the brain

Bugs that eat Hemlock woolly adelgidI’ve had bugs on the brain the last couple of weeks.

That’s because the New York State Hemlock Initiative invited me out to the Huyck Preserve in Rensselaerville to see the release of a predator fly that eats the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid — a forest pest that has afflicted the Lake George area of the Adirondacks. I went. About a week later, the Adirondack Park Invasive Plan Program held its annual partner meeting and guess what was a major highlight? Hemlock woolly adelgid. Check out adirondackexplorer.org for our coverage.

Of course, it was snowing when I went out to see these predator bugs released, so we missed the excitement of unscrewing a jar lid and sending them off. I confess that upon seeing these HWA predators in a jar, I was a bit underwhelmed by their size. They look more like fruit flies, hardly what one thinks when you hear the word “predator.” In my imagination, I whipped them up to look more like the size of house flies. I thought they’d be swarming in jars, thick and dense, so when they were let out, “release the flies!” would be a good thing to yell.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, February 25, 2021

Prevent the spread of invasives: upcoming webinars

Hemlock woolly adelgidUpcoming Learning Opportunities

Each of the following presentations will take place online.

Take Action Against Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Part 2) (Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program) – Wednesday, March 3 from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. – Participants will learn how to adopt a trailhead, carry out self-guided HWA field surveys, and collect environmental data using iMapInvasives, a free, easy-to-use, mobile mapping tool. Register in advance onlinePart 1 of this webinar will occur on 2/25 from 3-4:30 pm.

» Continue Reading.


Thursday, October 8, 2020

DEC forms partnership to bolster invasives efforts


Hemlock with HWA egg masses_Connecticut Agricultural Experiment StationAgreement Targets Invasive Species Research, Control, and Mitigation

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced new partnerships with the New York Invasive Species Research Institute (NYISRI) and Cornell University to develop and support projects and research to help limit the spread of invasive species.

» Continue Reading.


Sunday, October 4, 2020

Boat stewards report successful season and other invasives updates

The boating season may have unofficially ended Labor Day weekend, but New York State’s Watercraft Inspection Steward program continues at select locations. To date, this year’s boat stewards have inspected more than 330,000 boats, talked with hundreds of thousands of water recreationists, and intercepted more than 18,000 aquatic plant and animal hitchhikers (including one very important finding of the infamous invasive plant hydrilla!).

When you’re enjoying the water this fall, please continue to support our stewards’ good work and protect NY’s waters by remembering to clean, drain, and dry your watercraft.

» Continue Reading.



Wait! Before you go:

Catch up on all your Adirondack
news, delivered weekly to your inbox